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1.
Biosens Bioelectron ; 212: 114379, 2022 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1850709

ABSTRACT

The development of rapid and ultra-sensitive detection technology of SARS-CoV-2 RNA for shortening the diagnostic window and achieving early detection of virus infections is a huge challenge to the efficient prevention and control of COVID-19. Herein, a novel ultra-sensitive surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) sensor powered by non-enzymatic signal amplification is proposed for rapid and reliable assay of SARS-CoV-2 RNA based on SERS-active silver nanorods (AgNRs) sensing chips and a specially designed smart unlocking-mediated target recycling signal amplification strategy. The SERS sensing was carried out by a one-pot hybridization of the lock probes (LPs), hairpin DNAs and SERS tags with SARS-CoV-2 RNA samples on an arrayed SERS sensing chip to achieve the recognition of SARS-CoV-2 RNA, the execution of nuclease-free unlocking-mediated target recycling signal amplification, and the combination of SERS tags to generate SERS signal. The SERS sensor for SARS-CoV-2 RNA can be achieved within 50 min with an ultra-high sensitivity low to 51.38 copies/mL, and has good selectivity in discriminating SARS-CoV-2 RNA against other respiratory viruses in representative clinical samples, which is well adapted for rapid, ultra-sensitive, multi-channel and point-of-care testing of viral nucleic acids, and is expected to achieve detection of SARS-CoV-2 infection in earlier detection windows for efficient COVID-19 prevention and control.


Subject(s)
Biosensing Techniques , COVID-19 , Biosensing Techniques/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques/methods , Point-of-Care Systems , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
2.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-323658

ABSTRACT

Background: The coronavirus pneumonia is still spreading around the world. Much progress has been made in vaccine development, and vaccination will become an inevitable trend in the fight against this pandemic. However, the public acceptance of COVID-19 vaccination still remains uncertain. Methods: By calculating the sample size of random sampling, anonymous questionnaire was used in Wen Juan Xing survey platform. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were performed to identify the key sociodemographic, cognitive, and attitude associations with samples of healthcare workers and nonhealth care workers. Findings: A total of 2580 respondents have completed the questionnaire, including 1,329 healthcare workers and 1,251 nonhealthcare workers. This study showed that 76.98% of healthcare workers accepted the COVID-19 vaccine, 18.28% workers were hesitant, and 4.74% workers were resistant. Among the nonhealthcare workers, 56.19% workers received the COVID-19 vaccine, 37.57% workers were hesitant, and 6.24% workers were resistant. Among the healthcare workers, compared with vaccine recipients, vaccine-hesitant individuals were more likely to be female (AOR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.12–2.07);vaccine-resistant individuals were more likely to live in the suburbs (AOR = 2.81, 95% CI: 1.44–3.99) with an income of 10,000 RMB or greater (AOR = 2.00, 95% CI: 1.03–3.90). Among the nonhealthcare workers, vaccine-hesitant individuals were more likely to be female (AOR = 1.66, 95% CI: 1.31–2.11);vaccine-resistant individuals were also more likely to be female (AOR =1.87, 95% CI: 1.16–3.02) and older than 65 years (AOR = 4.96, 95% CI: 1.40–7.62). There are great differences between healthcare workers and nonhealthcare workers in their cognition and attitude towards vaccines. Interpretation: Our study shows that healthcare workers are more willing to be vaccinated than nonhealthcare workers. Current vaccine safety issues continue to be a major factor affecting public acceptance, and to expand vaccine coverage in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, appropriate vaccination strategies and immunization programs are essential, especially for nonhealthcare workers.Funding: Medical and Technology Project of Zhejiang ProvinceDeclaration of Interest: None to declare. Ethical Approval: This study is a nation-wide cross-sectional study in China;the ethics committee ofAffiliated Hospital of Hangzhou Normal University approved all the procedures performed.

3.
Risk Manag Healthc Policy ; 14: 5027-5038, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581543

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To compare food safety knowledge, attitudes, and self-reported practices among medical staff in China before, during, and after the COVID-19 pandemic. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The questionnaire was anonymous. All respondents were Chinese medical personnel. A Chi-square contingency table was used to compare the knowledge and attitudes of Chinese medical staff before, during and after COVID-19. R statistical software (v4.0.0) was used for analysis. RESULTS: A total of 1431 valid responses (57.3% from female respondents) were included in our analysis. Medical professionals were geographically distributed as follows: eastern China, 55.5%; central China, 19.7%; western China, 24.1%; Hong Kong, Macau, or Taiwan, 0.05%. Medical professionals reported that they paid greater attention to food safety after the COVID-19 pandemic compared with before the epidemic. Self-reported knowledge of and attitudes toward food safety among medical staff were significantly different before, during, and after the COVID-19 pandemic (both P<0.001). CONCLUSION: After the COVID-19 pandemic, medical professionals paid increasing attention to food safety, which is a clinically important change. Because medical professionals can influence public understanding of food safety, their increased attention to this subject may enable them to promote food safety knowledge more actively in their work. This may in turn promote a better understanding of food safety and protect the health of the general public.

4.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(12)2021 Nov 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542824

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has led to numerous tragic deaths all over the world. Great efforts have been made by worldwide nations for COVID-19 targeted vaccine development since the disease outbreak. In January 2021, the Chinese government started to provide free vaccination among nationwide communities, which was optional for citizens. As no evidence has been provided so far regarding COVID-19 vaccination acceptance since the initiation of nationwide vaccination, this study aims to investigate COVID-19 vaccination acceptance among Chinese citizens as well as its associated factors as an attempt to bridge such gap embedded in the current literature. An anonymous cross-sectional study was conducted online in March and April 2021 among adults, with the survey questionnaire designed based on the framework of the health belief model (HBM). Information on socio-demographics, risk perception, past pandemic-related experience, awareness of vaccination as well as acceptance of COVID-19 vaccination were collected. Chi-squared test and multi-level regression were performed to distinguish the acceptance between different groups as well as to identify the significant predictors. A total of 3940 participants completed the survey, with 90.6% of the participants reporting strong willingness to get vaccinated. A list of factors were found to be significantly associated with individuals' acceptance of vaccination, including the region of residence, ethnicity, annual income, whether or not they had experienced a major pandemic event in the past, risk perception of the COVID-19 as well as the awareness of receiving vaccination. Safety concerns about the vaccine (27.7%), concerns about receiving vaccination immediately after newly developed vaccines were released into the market (22.4%) as well as concerns about the potential side effects induced by vaccination (22.1%) were identified as the primary reasons of residents' resistance against vaccination. Overall, residents demonstrated strong willingness to receive vaccination against COVID-19 in China. However, the improvement of vaccination-related knowledge among Chinese residents should be highlighted as a critical strategy to facilitate the penetration of nationwide vaccination in order to ultimately achieve the establishment of herd immunity in China.

5.
Risk Manag Healthc Policy ; 14: 4393-4399, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496757

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Relevant studies show that population migration has a great impact on the early spread of infectious diseases. Therefore, it is important to explore whether there is an explicit relationship between population migration and the number of confirmed cases for the control of the COVID-19 epidemic. This paper mainly explores the impact of population migration on early COVID-19 transmission, and establishes a predictive nonlinear mathematical model to predict the number of early cases. METHODS: Data of confirmed cases were sourced from the official website of the Municipal Health Committee, and the proportions of migration from Wuhan to other cities were sourced from the Baidu data platform. The data of confirmed cases and the migration proportions of 14 cities in Hubei Province were collected, the COVID-19 cases study period was determined as 10 days based on the third quartile of the interval of the incubation period, and a non-linear mathematical model was constructed to clarify the relationship between the migration proportion and the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases. Finally, eight typical regions were selected to verify the accuracy of the model. RESULTS: The daily population migration rates and the growth curves of the number of confirmed cases in the 14 cities were basically consistent, and Pearson's correlation coefficient was 0.91. The specific mathematical expression of 14 regions is . In each of the fourteen cities, The nonlinear exponential model structure is as follows:. It was found that the R 2 values of the fitted mathematical model were greater than 0.8 in all studied regions, excluding Suizhou (p < 0.05). The established mathematical model was used to fit eight regions in China, and the correlations between the predicted and actual numbers of confirmed cases were greater than 0.9, excluding that of Hebei Province (0.82). CONCLUSION: The study found that population migration has a positive and significant impact on the spread of COVID-19. Modeling COVID-19 risk may be a useful strategy for directing public health surveillance and interventions. Restricting the migration of the population is of great significance to the joint prevention and control of the pandemic worldwide.

6.
J Am Coll Health ; : 1-8, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1380950

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the end of 2019, the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak rapidly became a pandemic. The psychological state of people during the COVID-19 pandemic has gained interest. Our aim was to study the prevalence of anxiety, depression, and stress in college students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: A systematic search of Medline, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library was conducted up to September 20, 2020. Reviewers independently assessed full-text articles according to predefined criteria. Stata14/SE was used to calculate the prevalence and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of anxiety, depression, and stress among college students from different countries. A random effects model was adopted. The Egger test was used to determine publication bias. Results: A total of 280 references were retrieved, and 28 papers met our inclusion criteria, for a total of 436,799 college students. Thirteen studies involved non-Chinese college students, and 15 studies involved Chinese college students. The prevalence of anxiety, depression, and stress was 29% (95% CI, 19-25%), 37% (95% CI, 32-42%), and 23% (95% CI, 8-39%), respectively. Conclusion: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a negative psychological effect on college students, and the prevalence of anxiety, depression, and stress among Chinese college students is lower than among non-Chinese college students.

7.
Front Public Health ; 9: 709056, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365588

ABSTRACT

Background: The coronavirus pneumonia is still spreading around the world. Much progress has been made in vaccine development, and vaccination will become an inevitable trend in the fight against this pandemic. However, the public acceptance of COVID-19 vaccination still remains uncertain. Methods: An anonymous questionnaire was used in Wen Juan Xing survey platform. All the respondents were divided into healthcare workers and non-healthcare workers. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were performed to identify the key sociodemographic, cognitive, and attitude associations among the samples of healthcare workers and non-healthcare workers. Results: A total of 2,580 respondents completed the questionnaire, including 1,329 healthcare workers and 1,251 non-healthcare workers. This study showed that 76.98% of healthcare workers accepted the COVID-19 vaccine, 18.28% workers were hesitant, and 4.74% workers were resistant. Among the non-healthcare workers, 56.19% workers received the COVID-19 vaccine, 37.57% workers were hesitant, and 6.24% workers were resistant. Among the healthcare workers, compared with vaccine recipients, vaccine-hesitant individuals were more likely to be female (AOR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.12-2.07); vaccine-resistant individuals were more likely to live in the suburbs (AOR = 2.81, 95% CI: 1.44-3.99) with an income of 10,000 RMB or greater (AOR = 2.00, 95% CI: 1.03-3.90). Among the non-healthcare workers, vaccine-hesitant individuals were more likely to be female (AOR = 1.66, 95% CI: 1.31-2.11); vaccine-resistant individuals were also more likely to be female (AOR = 1.87, 95% CI: 1.16-3.02) and older than 65 years (AOR = 4.96, 95% CI: 1.40-7.62). There are great differences between healthcare workers and non-healthcare workers in their cognition and attitude toward vaccines. Conclusions: Our study shows that healthcare workers are more willing to be vaccinated than non-healthcare workers. Current vaccine safety issues continue to be a major factor affecting public acceptance, and to expand vaccine coverage in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, appropriate vaccination strategies and immunization programs are essential, especially for non-healthcare workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination
8.
Risk Manag Healthc Policy ; 14: 2369-2375, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278279

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many people have experienced novel coronavirus pneumonia since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic in Wuhan, China. The Chinese government has encouraged people to wear face masks in public places; however, due to the large population, there may be a series of problems related to this recommendation, including shortages of masks and lack of an optimal disposal method for used masks. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to understand the current status of mask shortages and used masks in China. METHODS: A questionnaire survey was designed to assess the current status of mask shortages and used masks. The differences among groups were analyzed with chi-square tests. RESULTS: The constituent ratio of those who reuse masks was 61%. Obtaining masks from the drugstore was reported to be very difficult due to high demand and short supply, and approximately 1/3 of the respondents purchased expensive masks. Most people know how to properly handle used masks, and only 7% of them casually discard masks. However, 50% of respondents have seen others throw away used masks at will. A further subgroup analysis showed that respondents in Central China tended to use masks repeatedly, as did medical personnel. Females, people living in the central region, and medical personnel may find it more difficult to purchase masks in drugstores. Non-medical personnel may be more likely to buy expensive masks. Females, people living in the western region, and medical personnel may be more likely to know how to properly handle used masks and not to discard used masks at will. Medical personnel may be more likely to observe others discarding used masks at will. CONCLUSION: In response to COVID-19, the public should be encouraged to use face masks and are advised not to reuse or throw away masks at will due to safety concerns.

9.
Ir J Med Sci ; 191(2): 563-567, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1237551

ABSTRACT

AIMS: We aimed to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 epidemic on emergency and cardiovascular disease-related calls in Hangzhou, China. METHODS: We conducted a single-center retrospective study, collecting data on emergency calls to the Hangzhou Emergency Center (HEC) during the COVID-19 epidemic (January 20, 2020, to March 15, 2020). Data were compared with the same period in 2019. RESULTS: Compared to 2019, the number of emergency calls has dropped by 21.63%, ambulance calls by 29.02%, rescue calls by 22.57%, and cardiovascular disease-related emergency calls by 32.86%. The numbers of emergency, ambulance, and rescue calls in 2020 were significantly lower than in 2019. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 epidemic in Hangzhou, the numbers of emergency and cardiovascular disease-related calls have decreased significantly. These results point to a severe social problem that requires the attention of the medical community and the government.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
10.
JMIR Ment Health ; 8(2): e27596, 2021 Feb 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1110193

ABSTRACT

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.2196/23125.].

11.
JMIR Ment Health ; 8(1): e23125, 2021 01 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1040100

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of COVID-19 has dominated headlines worldwide. The number of infections has continued to rise and had reached 30,000 worldwide at the time this paper was written. Because of the high risk of nosocomial transmission, medical health care workers may be experiencing substantial psychological stress. This descriptive study aimed to identify psychosocial effects on hospital staff associated with working in a hospital environment during the COVID-19 outbreak. OBJECTIVE: Our survey participants included 57 frontline clinicians working at Wuhan First Hospital and 157 medical students working at Jiangsu Provincial People's Hospital during the COVID-19 outbreak. The questionnaire we adopted included questions regarding the participants' personal well-being, sociodemographic characteristics, and psychological status. METHODS: 57 frontline clinicians working in Wuhan First Hospital and 157 medical training students working in Jiangsu Provincial Peoples Hospital during this outbreak participated in our survey. The questionnaire we adopted included questions regarding the participants' personal well-being, sociodemographic characteristics and the psychological status. RESULTS: The COVID-19 outbreak had psychological impacts both on formal workers and medical students. The psychological effects included sleep disorders, anxiety, and depression. There was no significant difference between the group of formal workers and medical students (P=.85), and more than 50% (30/54, 56%, vs. 83/157, 52.9%) of the respondents reported pandemic-related mental disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that the high risk of SARS-CoV-2 exposure caused substantial psychological stress among health care workers. This finding emphasizes the need to promote psychological crisis intervention for medical personnel during this epidemic.

12.
JMIR Ment Health ; 8(1): e23125, 2021 01 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-993065

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of COVID-19 has dominated headlines worldwide. The number of infections has continued to rise and had reached 30,000 worldwide at the time this paper was written. Because of the high risk of nosocomial transmission, medical health care workers may be experiencing substantial psychological stress. This descriptive study aimed to identify psychosocial effects on hospital staff associated with working in a hospital environment during the COVID-19 outbreak. OBJECTIVE: Our survey participants included 57 frontline clinicians working at Wuhan First Hospital and 157 medical students working at Jiangsu Provincial People's Hospital during the COVID-19 outbreak. The questionnaire we adopted included questions regarding the participants' personal well-being, sociodemographic characteristics, and psychological status. METHODS: 57 frontline clinicians working in Wuhan First Hospital and 157 medical training students working in Jiangsu Provincial Peoples Hospital during this outbreak participated in our survey. The questionnaire we adopted included questions regarding the participants' personal well-being, sociodemographic characteristics and the psychological status. RESULTS: The COVID-19 outbreak had psychological impacts both on formal workers and medical students. The psychological effects included sleep disorders, anxiety, and depression. There was no significant difference between the group of formal workers and medical students (P=.85), and more than 50% (30/54, 56%, vs. 83/157, 52.9%) of the respondents reported pandemic-related mental disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that the high risk of SARS-CoV-2 exposure caused substantial psychological stress among health care workers. This finding emphasizes the need to promote psychological crisis intervention for medical personnel during this epidemic.

13.
Chinese Journal of Nosocomiology ; 30(19):2900-2903, 2020.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-934882

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore the establishment and application of novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pneumonia prevention and control system in general hospitals, to formulate effective prevention and control strategies, so as to provide experience for general hospitals to establish a scientific epidemic prevention and control system, and become a long-term effect mechanism. METHODS: Based on the principles of management of three links of infectious diseases "infectious source, transmission route and susceptible population", through strengthening personnel training, health monitoring, disinfection and protection, material allocation and health science popularization, optimizing diagnosis and treatment area and channel, establishing emergency plans and supervision mechanism, strengthening the management of key departments and the application of artificial intelligence, combined with the actual situation of the hospital, the general hospital formulated scientific and effective prevention and control strategies, payed attention to detail, and ensured the implementation of prevention and control measures. RESULTS: The hospital diagnosis and treatment activities were carried out in an orderly manner, the prevention and control measures were effective and feasible, the awareness of prevention and control of infectious diseases of doctors and patients was significantly enhanced, and the awareness rate of prevention and control knowledge reached 100.00%. The compliance of hand hygiene of medical personnel was improved, and the standards for wearing and removing of protective equipment and disinfection and sterilization were reasonable. The hospital staff, outpatient emergency and inpatients were not infected with COVID-19. CONCLUSION: The establishment and application of a scientific hospital infection prevention and control system can effectively control the spread and infection of novel coronavirus in general hospitals.

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