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1.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(31): e29931, 2022 Aug 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2008660

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The diagnosis and treatment rate of Parkinson disease (PD) with depression has a low diagnostic rate, and there is no consensus on the choice of treatment mode. This study evaluates the global research trends of scientific outputs related to depression in PD from multiple perspectives, using a bibliometric analysis and visualization tool to scientifically analyze the knowledge from the literature. METHODS: Literature related to depression in PD published from 2012 to 2021 was included and selected from the Web of Science Core Collection database in October 2021. CiteSpace software was used to visualize and analyze co-occurrence analyses for countries, institutions, authors, and keywords. RESULTS: A total of 4533 articles from the Web of Science database were included. The United States made the largest contribution with the majority of publications (1215; 29.40%). Toronto University was the most productive institution. PD, depression, quality of life, dementia, nonmotor symptom, prevalence, anxiety, Alzheimer disease, symptom, and disorder would be significantly correlated with depression in PD. The current hot spots in this field focus on the following: risk factors for depression in PD, assessment scale of depression in PD, and rehabilitation of depression in PD. CONCLUSIONS: This analysis not only reveals the current research trends and hotspots but also provides some instructive suggestions on the development of depression in PD.


Subject(s)
Parkinson Disease , Bibliometrics , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Humans , Parkinson Disease/complications , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Publications , Quality of Life , United States
2.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 7(7): ofaa250, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-654317

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Various types of pulmonary diseases are associated with iron deficiency. However, information on iron status in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is scarce. METHODS: This study included 50 hospitalized patients with confirmed COVID-19. The role of serum iron in predicting severity and mortality of COVID-19 was evaluated. RESULTS: The most common symptoms of COVID-19 patients in this study were cough (82%), fever (64%), and chest distress (42%). Of the 50 patients, 45 (90%) patients had abnormally low serum iron levels (<7.8 µmol/L). The severity of COVID-19 was negatively correlated with serum iron levels before and after treatment and was positively correlated with C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A, D-dimer, lactate dehydrogenase, urea nitrogen, and myoglobin levels. Decreased serum iron level could predict the transition of COVID-19 from mild to severe and critical illness. Seven (53.8%) patients with a lower serum iron level after treatment in the critical group had died. There was a significant difference in posttreatment serum iron levels between COVID-19 survivors and nonsurvivors. CONCLUSIONS: Serum iron deficiency was detected in the patients with COVID-19. The severity and mortality of the disease was closely correlated with serum iron levels. Low serum iron concentration was an independent risk factor for death in COVID-19 patients.

3.
J Infect Dis ; 222(2): 183-188, 2020 06 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-245018

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has recently emerged and caused the rapid spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) worldwide. METHODS: We did a retrospective study and included COVID-19 patients admitted to Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University between 1 February and 29 February 2020. Antibody assay was conducted to detect COVID-19 envelope protein E and nucleocapsid protein N antigen. RESULTS: One hundred twelve patients were recruited with symptoms of fever, cough, fatigue, myalgia, and diarrhea. All patients underwent antibody tests. Fifty-eight (51.79%) were positive for both immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG), 7 (6.25%) were negative for both antibodies, 1 (0.89%) was positive for only IgM, and 46 (41.07%) were positive for only IgG. IgM antibody appeared within a week post-disease onset, lasted for 1 month, and gradually decreased, whereas IgG antibody was produced 10 days after infection and lasted for a longer time. However, no significant difference in levels of IgM and IgG antibodies between positive and negative patients of nucleic acid test after treatment was found. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that serological tests could be a powerful approach for the early diagnosis of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Serologic Tests
4.
Respir Med ; 167: 105951, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-35125

ABSTRACT

Patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) often have clinical characteristics, such as chest tightness and dyspnea. Continuous, unresolved dyspnea often indicates the progression of lung lesions. The mechanism that underlies the chest distress and dyspnea in patients with COVID-19 is still unclear. Chest CT has a higher sensitivity and can play an essential role in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. However, our clinical observations showed that although some patients had significant chest distress and dyspnea, the lesions that were observed in the lungs during computed tomography were milder and not completely consistent with clinical symptoms. We analyzed the clinical characteristics, laboratory test results, and imaging findings of these patients. We found that extensive inflammation of the bilateral and respiratory bronchioles in patients with COVID-19 due to excessive activation of proinflammatory cytokines and chemotactic aggregation of T-lymphocytes at the site of inflammation are possible mechanisms underlying chest distress and dyspnea in patients with COVID-19. Short-time and lose-dose use of corticosteroid may be helpful to treat chest tightness and dyspnea in mild COVID-19 patients. Through this study, we aimed to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Dyspnea/diagnostic imaging , Dyspnea/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Adult , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Radiography, Thoracic/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
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