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1.
Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research ; 67(5):725-740, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20241622

ABSTRACT

This article is based on qualitative and quantitative data collected from teachers and pupils in Danish schools in June 2020, as schools reopened following closures in the spring due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It investigates the transformations in school life that took place in this period in response to strict official guidelines to prevent the spread of infection, transformations both in school learning environments and in teaching activities. Using factor and cluster analyses and logistic regression, it explores the relation between teaching environment and pupils' emotional, social, and academic wellbeing, identifying correlations between key factors in the environment and the three dimensions of wellbeing. The study contributes both to understanding and dealing with the crisis in which education systems in the Nordic countries have found themselves in and adds relevant knowledge on themes of importance for education in the future.

2.
Research in Transportation Economics ; 98, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2300933

ABSTRACT

We have examined how COVID-19 impacted travel behaviour for people with psychosocial disabilities, identified key barriers when using public transport, and examined how a broad understanding of universal design can be used to improve travel for people with psychosocial disabilities. During and after the pandemic, most informants travelled less and/or used their car more than before. Some stopped using public transport due to fear of contamination, while others found it easier to travel during the pandemic due to less crowding. Use of facial masks were perceived by some as an additional problem increasing anxiety, while others found it more problematic with fellow passengers not wearing masks. In general, findings support prior studies in terms of barriers related to crowding, lack of seamlessness, financial issues, problems with staff, lack of access in rural areas, and low knowledge of support systems. Additionally, lack of toilet facilities, negative experiences with other passengers, sensory overload, travel-induced fatigue, and problems related to planning are considered problematic. Station areas may pose a barrier for people with former drug addictions. Hence, universal design should include the social and organisation environments, in addition to physical design, in terms of making the transport system accessible to everyone. © 2023 The Author

3.
Social Sciences and Missions ; 35(3-4):274-307, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2194433

ABSTRACT

This paper explores responses to COVID-19 by the Buddhist organisation Soka Gakkai in Japan. Sōka means ‘value-creation', but what kind of ‘value' was created amidst a global pandemic? So-called ‘new religions' in the context of Japan are typically presumed to embody a ‘flight from the human world' into the exotic and remote. SG's response, however, encouraged people to stay very much within a ‘human-bound world'. How did SG differ compared to other popular responses in Japan that drew on yōkai (or ‘spirits') for comfort in defeating the soon objectified virus ‘monster'? SG may be well-built for responding to disaster in its extensive grassroots networks and its daily newspaper to provide information. Responding with a renewed focus on study, chanting and outreach also highlights, however, how the meaning of ‘hope' and ‘well-being' were generated by internal change while structurally working to realise the SDG s as part of more long-term solutions. © KONINKLIJKE BRILL NV, LEIDEN, 2022.

4.
European journal of public health ; 32(Suppl 3), 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2124738

ABSTRACT

Background LGBTQ+ adolescents living with mental conditions are affected by stigma based on their health status, sexual orientation, and/or gender identity/expression (SOGIE), especially when navigating their learning environments. Our aim is to gain detailed insights into how LGBTQ+ adolescents living with mental conditions vision their learning environments so that they can feel safe and supported enough to freely disclose their SOGIE and health status, and hence thrive. Methods Aware of the participants’ vulnerabilities, a dialogical narrative-based approach was used to gather thick descriptions and deep insight, while applying the “seven C's”: conversation, curiosity, context, complexity, challenge, caution, and care (Frank, 2019). Recruitment was done through LGBTQ+ Denmark and via networks of networks. Two LGBTQ+ young adults living with chronic conditions held the dialogues. Mode of communication was chosen by the participants (either face-to-face, via internet or via telephone). Data analysis was conducted via the “analysis grid” (Roest et al. 2021). Results Nine dialogues lasting from 20 to 50 minutes were held with youth from 14 to 24 years old during spring 2022. According to their narratives, supportive and safe learning environments would: respect for change of names and pronouns, update learning materials, allow for flipped classrooms (hybrid teaching tested under COVID lockdowns), have separate neutral change rooms/bathrooms and create safe private spaces to take medications. They would also permit higher absenteeism rates for those living with chronic conditions or getting hormonal treatments, allow for more breaks/slower version of the pensum, and show proactive healthy curiosity and respect for “invisible diseases”, fluid SOGIEs and neurodiversity/neurodivergent profiles. Conclusions The differing participants’ narratives provide innovative ways to create safe and supportive inclusive learning environment that embrace and enhance diversity.

6.
Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research ; : 1-16, 2022.
Article in English | Taylor & Francis | ID: covidwho-1713308
7.
Global Advances in Health and Medicine ; 10:45, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1234530

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the feasibility of a combined group acupuncture and yoga intervention for chronic pain in an underserved population. Methods: The study was conducted at Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) in New York City. Study participants were referred by their primary care provider and had documented lower back, neck, or osteoarthritis pain for greater than 3 months. Each participant received 10 weeks of intervention: 10 weeks of acupuncture in a group setting;and 8 weeks of yoga therapy directly following acupuncture during weeks 3-10. The primary outcome was pain interference and pain intensity at the 10-week assessment, using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), repeated again at 24 weeks. Results: COVID-19 halted our study in March 2020, with 94 patients enrolled. Participant demographics confirmed significant underserved status, with 62% covered by Medicaid;and 23% reporting yearly income less than $20,000. 47% of participants self-reported Black as race;and 44% Latino/Hispanic as ethnicity. At the time of the preliminary analysis, we had 10-week assessment data on 57 participants and 24-week assessment data on 31 participants. BPI data for pain interference at 10 weeks showed a 36% improvement from baseline, and for pain severity a 45% improvement from baseline. Pain interference improvement at 24-weeks showed a 20% improvement from baseline;while pain severity at 24 weeks over baseline showed a 57% improvement. All BPI measures had statistical significance at less than.01. Conclusion: Our pilot study illustrated proof of concept that we could successfully recruit and treat underserved participants with group acupuncture combined with yoga therapy for chronic pain. Preliminary results also suggest that participants achieved improvements in pain interference and pain severity after treatment. These improvements may be maintained in some measure two months after intervention. Further analysis is pending.

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