Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 5 de 5
Filter
1.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-315970

ABSTRACT

Background: Data on incidence, clinical presentation and outcomes of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia requiring mechanical ventilation (MV) are limited. Methods: . Case series of patients with COVID-19 pneumonia admitted to a single ICU in France. All consecutive patients requiring MV with RT-PCR–confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection between March 12th and April 24 th , 2020 were included. Frequency, clinical characteristics, responsible pathogens and outcomes of VAP were assessed, and compared to an historical cohort of patients with severe influenza-associated pneumonia requiring MV admitted to the same ICU during the preceding three winter seasons. Results: : Among 54 consecutive patients with Covid-19–associated acute respiratory failure requiring MV included (median (IQR) age 48 (42-58) years;74% male;93% requiring venovenous-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation), 46 (85%) developed VAP (median (IQR) MV duration before the first episode, 11 (8-16) days). VAP-causative pathogens were predominantly Enterobacteriaceae (72%), particularly inducible AmpC-cephalosporinase producers (41%), followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (35%). VAP recurred in 46 (85%) patients and 17 (31%) died. Most recurrences were relapses (ie, infection with the same pathogen), with a high percentage occurring on adequate antimicrobial treatment. Despite a high P. aeruginosa -VAP rate in patients with influenza-associated ARDS, the pulmonary infection recurrence rate was significantly lower than in Covid-19 patients. Overall mortality was similar for the two groups. Conclusions: : Patients with severe Covid-19–associated acute respiratory failure requiring MV had a very high late-onset VAP rate. Inducible AmpC-cephalosporinase–producing Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa frequently caused VAP, with multiple recurrences and difficulties eradicating the pathogen from the lung.

2.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med ; 2021 May 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1416749

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Early empirical antimicrobial treatment is frequently prescribed to critically ill patients with COVID-19, based on Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine the prevalence of early bacterial identification in intubated patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia, as compared to influenza pneumonia, and to characterize its microbiology and impact on outcomes. METHODS: Multicenter retrospective European cohort performed in 36 ICUs. All adult patients receiving invasive mechanical ventilation >48h were eligible if they had SARS-CoV-2 or influenza pneumonia at ICU admission. Bacterial identification was defined by a positive bacterial culture, within 48h after intubation, in endotracheal aspirates, bronchoalveolar lavage, blood cultures, or a positive pneumococcal or legionella urinary antigen test. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: 1,050 patients were included (568 in SARS-CoV-2 and 482 in influenza groups). The prevalence of bacterial identification was significantly lower in patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia as compared to patients with influenza pneumonia (9.7 vs 33.6%, unadjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.21 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.15 to 0.30), adjusted OR 0.23 (95% CI 0.16 to 0.33), p<0.0001). Gram-positive cocci were responsible for 58% and 72% of co-infection in patients with SARS-CoV-2 and influenza pneumonia, respectively. Bacterial identification was associated with increased adjusted hazard ratio for 28-day mortality in patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia (1.57 (95% CI 1.01 to 2.44), p=0.043). However, no significant difference was found in heterogeneity of outcomes related to bacterial identification between the two study groups, suggesting that the impact of co-infection on mortality was not different between SARS-CoV-2 and influenza patients. CONCLUSIONS: Bacterial identification within 48h after intubation is significantly less frequent in patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia as compared to patients with influenza pneumonia. This article is open access and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

3.
Thromb Haemost ; 121(8): 1031-1042, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1324458

ABSTRACT

Hemostatic changes induced by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support have been yet poorly documented in coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) patients who have a baseline complex hypercoagulable state. In this prospective monocentric study of patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) rescued by ECMO, we performed longitudinal measurements of coagulation and fibrinolysis markers throughout the course of ECMO support in 20 COVID-19 and 10 non-COVID-19 patients. Blood was sampled before and then 24 hours, 7, and 14 days after ECMO implantation. Clinical outcomes were prospectively assessed until discharge from the intensive care unit or death. The median age of participants was 47 (35-56) years, with a median body mass index of 30 (27-35) kg/m2, and a Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment score of 12 (8-16). Baseline levels of von Willebrand factor, fibrinogen, factor VIII, prothrombin F1 + 2, thrombin-antithrombin, D-dimer, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) were elevated in both COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 ARDS patients, indicating that endothelial activation, endogenous thrombin generation, and fibrinolysis shutdown occur in all ARDS patients before ECMO implantation. From baseline to day 7, thrombin generation (prothrombin F1 + 2, p < 0.01) and fibrin formation markers (fibrin monomers, p < 0.001) significantly increased, further resulting in significant decreases in platelet count (p < 0.0001) and fibrinogen level (p < 0.001). PAI-1 levels significantly decreased from baseline to day 7 (p < 0.0001) in all ARDS patients. These changes were more marked in COVID-19 patients, resulting in 14 nonfatal and 3 fatal bleeding. Additional studies are warranted to determine whether monitoring of thrombin generation and fibrinolysis markers might help to early predict bleeding complications in COVID-19 patients supported by ECMO.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/therapy , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/adverse effects , Fibrinolysis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Adult , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , Female , Hemorrhage/etiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , von Willebrand Factor/analysis
4.
Ann Intensive Care ; 10(1): 158, 2020 Nov 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-940755

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The data on incidence, clinical presentation, and outcomes of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia requiring mechanical ventilation (MV) are limited. We performed this retrospective cohort study to assess frequency, clinical characteristics, responsible pathogens, and outcomes of VAP in patients COVID-19 pneumonia requiring MV between March 12th and April 24th, 2020 (all had RT-PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection). Patients with COVID-19-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requiring ECMO were compared with an historical cohort of 45 patients with severe influenza-associated ARDS requiring ECMO admitted to the same ICU during the preceding three winter seasons. RESULTS: Among 50 consecutive patients with Covid-19-associated ARDS requiring ECMO included [median (IQR) age 48 (42-56) years; 72% male], 43 (86%) developed VAP [median (IQR) MV duration before the first episode, 10 (8-16) days]. VAP-causative pathogens were predominantly Enterobacteriaceae (70%), particularly inducible AmpC-cephalosporinase producers (40%), followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (37%). VAP recurred in 34 (79%) patients and 17 (34%) died. Most recurrences were relapses (i.e., infection with the same pathogen), with a high percentage occurring on adequate antimicrobial treatment. Estimated cumulative incidence of VAP, taking into account death and extubation as competing events, was significantly higher in Covid-19 patients than in influenza patients (p = 0.002). Despite a high P. aeruginosa-VAP rate in patients with influenza-associated ARDS (54%), the pulmonary infection recurrence rate was significantly lower than in Covid-19 patients. Overall mortality was similar for the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with severe Covid-19-associated ARDS requiring ECMO had a very high late-onset VAP rate. Inducible AmpC-cephalosporinase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa frequently caused VAP, with multiple recurrences and difficulties eradicating the pathogen from the lung.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL