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1.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 119(21): e2202012119, 2022 05 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1852638

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS­CoV-2) is a worldwide health concern, and new treatment strategies are needed. Targeting inflammatory innate immunity pathways holds therapeutic promise, but effective molecular targets remain elusive. Here, we show that human caspase-4 (CASP4) and its mouse homolog, caspase-11 (CASP11), are up-regulated in SARS­CoV-2 infections and that CASP4 expression correlates with severity of SARS­CoV-2 infection in humans. SARS­CoV-2­infected Casp11−/− mice were protected from severe weight loss and lung pathology, including blood vessel damage, compared to wild-type (WT) mice and mice lacking the caspase downstream effector gasdermin-D (Gsdmd−/−). Notably, viral titers were similar regardless of CASP11 knockout. Global transcriptomics of SARS­CoV-2­infected WT, Casp11−/−, and Gsdmd−/− lungs identified restrained expression of inflammatory molecules and altered neutrophil gene signatures in Casp11−/− mice. We confirmed that protein levels of inflammatory mediators interleukin (IL)-1ß, IL-6, and CXCL1, as well as neutrophil functions, were reduced in Casp11−/− lungs. Additionally, Casp11−/− lungs accumulated less von Willebrand factor, a marker for endothelial damage, but expressed more Kruppel-Like Factor 2, a transcription factor that maintains vascular integrity. Overall, our results demonstrate that CASP4/11 promotes detrimental SARS­CoV-2­induced inflammation and coagulopathy, largely independently of GSDMD, identifying CASP4/11 as a promising drug target for treatment and prevention of severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Caspases, Initiator/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/pathology , Caspases, Initiator/genetics , Disease Progression , Humans , Lung/pathology , Mice , Mice, Knockout , Severity of Illness Index , /genetics
2.
Anesthesiology ; 137(1): 67-78, 2022 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784403

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 causes hypercoagulability, but the association between coagulopathy and hypoxemia in critically ill patients has not been thoroughly explored. This study hypothesized that severity of coagulopathy would be associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome severity, major thrombotic events, and mortality in patients requiring intensive care unit-level care. METHODS: Viscoelastic testing by rotational thromboelastometry and coagulation factor biomarker analyses were performed in this prospective observational cohort study of critically ill COVID-19 patients from April 2020 to October 2020. Statistical analyses were performed to identify significant coagulopathic biomarkers such as fibrinolysis-inhibiting plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 and their associations with clinical outcomes such as mortality, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation requirement, occurrence of major thrombotic events, and severity of hypoxemia (arterial partial pressure of oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen categorized into mild, moderate, and severe per the Berlin criteria). RESULTS: In total, 53 of 55 (96%) of the cohort required mechanical ventilation and 9 of 55 (16%) required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation-naïve patients demonstrated lysis indices at 30 min indicative of fibrinolytic suppression on rotational thromboelastometry. Survivors demonstrated fewer procoagulate acute phase reactants, such as microparticle-bound tissue factor levels (odds ratio, 0.14 [0.02, 0.99]; P = 0.049). Those who did not experience significant bleeding events had smaller changes in ADAMTS13 levels compared to those who did (odds ratio, 0.05 [0, 0.7]; P = 0.026). Elevations in plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (odds ratio, 1.95 [1.21, 3.14]; P = 0.006), d-dimer (odds ratio, 3.52 [0.99, 12.48]; P = 0.05), and factor VIII (no clot, 1.15 ± 0.28 vs. clot, 1.42 ± 0.31; P = 0.003) were also demonstrated in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation-naïve patients who experienced major thrombotic events. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 levels were significantly elevated during periods of severe compared to mild and moderate acute respiratory distress syndrome (severe, 44.2 ± 14.9 ng/ml vs. mild, 31.8 ± 14.7 ng/ml and moderate, 33.1 ± 15.9 ng/ml; P = 0.029 and 0.039, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Increased inflammatory and procoagulant markers such as plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, microparticle-bound tissue factor, and von Willebrand factor levels are associated with severe hypoxemia and major thrombotic events, implicating fibrinolytic suppression in the microcirculatory system and subsequent micro- and macrovascular thrombosis in severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders , COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Thrombophilia , Thrombosis , Blood Coagulation Disorders/complications , COVID-19/complications , Critical Illness , Fibrinolysis , Humans , Hypoxia/complications , Microcirculation , Oxygen , Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , Thrombophilia/complications , Thromboplastin
3.
Neurosurgery ; 90(6): 725-733, 2022 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1724730

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The mechanisms and outcomes in coronavirus disease (COVID-19)-associated stroke are unique from those of non-COVID-19 stroke. OBJECTIVE: To describe the efficacy and outcomes of acute revascularization of large vessel occlusion (LVO) in the setting of COVID-19 in an international cohort. METHODS: We conducted an international multicenter retrospective study of consecutively admitted patients with COVID-19 with concomitant acute LVO across 50 comprehensive stroke centers. Our control group constituted historical controls of patients presenting with LVO and receiving a mechanical thrombectomy between January 2018 and December 2020. RESULTS: The total cohort was 575 patients with acute LVO; 194 patients had COVID-19 while 381 patients did not. Patients in the COVID-19 group were younger (62.5 vs 71.2; P < .001) and lacked vascular risk factors (49, 25.3% vs 54, 14.2%; P = .001). Modified thrombolysis in cerebral infarction 3 revascularization was less common in the COVID-19 group (74, 39.2% vs 252, 67.2%; P < .001). Poor functional outcome at discharge (defined as modified Ranklin Scale 3-6) was more common in the COVID-19 group (150, 79.8% vs 132, 66.7%; P = .004). COVID-19 was independently associated with a lower likelihood of achieving modified thrombolysis in cerebral infarction 3 (odds ratio [OR]: 0.4, 95% CI: 0.2-0.7; P < .001) and unfavorable outcomes (OR: 2.5, 95% CI: 1.4-4.5; P = .002). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 was an independent predictor of incomplete revascularization and poor outcomes in patients with stroke due to LVO. Patients with COVID-19 with LVO were younger, had fewer cerebrovascular risk factors, and suffered from higher morbidity/mortality rates.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Stroke , Brain Ischemia/etiology , Cerebral Infarction/etiology , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Stroke/etiology , Thrombectomy/adverse effects , Treatment Outcome
6.
J Neurointerv Surg ; 13(3): 202-206, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-970181

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) results from infection by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). It was first reported in Wuhan, China in patients suffering from severe pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome and has now grown into the first pandemic in over 100 years. Patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 develop arterial thrombosis including stroke, myocardial infarction and peripheral arterial thrombosis, all of which result in poor outcomes despite maximal medical, endovascular, and microsurgical treatment compared with non-COVID-19-infected patients. In this review we provide a brief overview of SARS-CoV-2, the infectious agent responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic, and describe the mechanisms responsible for COVID-19-associated coagulopathy. Finally, we discuss the impact of COVID-19 on ischemic stroke, focusing on large vessel occlusion.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Ischemic Stroke/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombolytic Therapy/methods , Thrombosis/epidemiology , Brain Ischemia/therapy , COVID-19/therapy , China/epidemiology , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Thrombolytic Therapy/trends , Thrombosis/therapy
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