Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 12 de 12
Filter
1.
Optical Interactions with Tissue and Cells XXXIII|and Advanced Photonics in Urology 2022 ; 11958, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1832305

ABSTRACT

The demand for biophotonics technologies has rapidly increased over the years and supply of professionals capable of working in multi- and inter-disciplinary topics associated with tissue optics and translating optical technologies to the clinic are still scarce. Despite the number of programs to created to increase the number of high-quality biophotonics professionals, most of these programs are focused on post-graduate audiences and involve in-person activities. Particularly on the education side, online teaching and learning (OTL) have exponentially grown over the years as universities adopted online courses. During the COVID-19 pandemic, social distancing restrictions required courses to be offered fully online. Educators have adopted combinations of resources including online apps, simulations, virtual labs, and massive open online courses (MOOCs) to complement recorded or video-conferenced classes. However, most of these resources were not designed to be integrated into virtual courses, compromising the quality of instruction/education especially in events relying on in-person activities to convey information quicker than online activities. These events include short-term courses and outreach events, where fostering students' engagement and interest with fully online activities can be challenging. The quality of instruction is further compromised when events involve multidisciplinary/interdisciplinary OTL, which includes biophotonics and biomedical optics courses. To overcome the aforementioned challenges, we have developed and tested a variety of activities and resources for a short-term virtual biophotonics workshop (BW) including webinars, at-home experiments, and computer simulations. Our BW targeted undergraduate students and secondary-school teachers with diverse backgrounds and offered activities to meet needs of learners with diverse backgrounds, learning styles and education levels. Resources provided self-paced learning over the duration of the workshop. Our participants' feedback for 2020 and 2021 BWs showed >78.6% of participating respondents considered every activity of the BW important for their learning process. Also, every BW activity received >69.2% "Very good"and ""Good"responses for overall learning, >91.7% for quality of teaching, >90% for quality of subject matter. Similarly, >75% of participants were "Very interested"or "Interested"in every activity. © COPYRIGHT SPIE.

2.
Clinical Cancer Research ; 27(6 SUPPL 1), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1816940

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic had enormous consequences in Brazil and worldwide. Patients with cancer affected by COVID-19 are at a higher risk of developing complications and worse outcomes compared to a non-cancer population, particularly the ones on active systemic treatment. Considering the COVID-19 high transmissibility in asymptomatic and presymptomatic patients, we sought to determine the prevalence of COVID-19 infection in patients with solid cancers receiving systemic therapy in a Brazilian public health hospital. Furthermore, we interrogated if socioeconomic status (SES) was associated with prevalence. Methods: Consecutive asymptomatic patients undergoing treatment for solid tumors at the chemotherapy and infusion center of Hospital de Base were enrolled. Patients were prospectively tested for SARS-CoV2 RNA real-time polymerase chain reaction with nasal and oropharyngeal swabs immediately prior to treatment. A socioeconomic survey was performed prior to testing. Demographic and socioeconomic characteristics were summarized in means, medians, and proportions. Results: From October 6 to 13, 2020, 148 asymptomatic patients were identified. Of those, 41 were excluded (16 had hematological malignancies, 15 declined testing, 10 were not on active systemic treatment) leaving 107 eligible patients. The mean age of the population was 58 years-old (SD± 12.6);55% were female and 90% were self-identified as White. The most common cancer sites were gastrointestinal tract (37%) and breast (25%). Most patients had metastatic disease (62.9%) and were on a anticancer treatment involving chemotherapy (62.9%). Regarding to SES, 70% of our population had either primary school or were illiterate as their highest educational level. In terms of monthly income, 88% had a personal income inferior to U$390 and 92% a household income inferior to U$585. Of 107 patients tested, only one (0.9%) was positive for COVID-19. This is a 48 years-old man living in an urban area, with primary school educational level and a monthly personal income inferior to U$390. Conclusion: Despite a high prevalence of COVID19 in Brazil, our cohort demonstrated a low prevalence of COVID19 (0.9%) amongst asymptomatic patients with cancer. We hypothesize that patients with cancer, independently of their SES, are aware of the increased risk of developing severe disease and are adherent to physical distancing, masking, and hygiene measures. LF and BB are co-senior authors.

3.
Giovanetti, M.; Slavov, S. N.; Fonseca, V.; Wilkinson, E.; Tegally, H.; Patané, J. S. L.; Viala, V. L.; San, J. E.; Rodrigues, E. S.; Vieira Santos, E.; Aburjaile, F.; Xavier, J.; Fritsch, H.; Ribeiro Adelino, T. E.; Pereira, F.; Leal, A.; Campos de Melo Iani, F.; de Carvalho Pereira, G.; Vazquez, C.; Mercedes Estigarribia Sanabria, G.; de Oliveira, E. C.; Demarchi, L.; Croda, J.; Dos Santos Bezerra, R.; Oliveira de Lima, L. P.; Martins, A. J.; Dos Santos Barros, C. R.; Marqueze, E. C.; de Souza Todao Bernardino, J.; Moretti, D. B.; Brassaloti, R. A.; de Lello Rocha Campos Cassano, R.; Drummond Sampaio Corrêa Mariani, P.; Kitajima, J. P.; Santos, B.; Proto-Siqueira, R.; Cantarelli, V. V.; Tosta, S.; Brandão Nardy, V.; Reboredo de Oliveira da Silva, L.; Astete Gómez, M. K.; Lima, J. G.; Ribeiro, A. A.; Guimarães, N. R.; Watanabe, L. T.; Barbosa Da Silva, L.; da Silva Ferreira, R.; MP, F. da Penha, Ortega, M. J.; Gómez de la Fuente, A.; Villalba, S.; Torales, J.; Gamarra, M. L.; Aquino, C.; Martínez Figueredo, G. P.; Fava, W. S.; Motta-Castro, A. R. C.; Venturini, J.; do Vale Leone de Oliveira, S. M.; Cavalheiro Maymone Gonçalves, C.; Debur Rossa, M. D. C.; Becker, G. N.; Presibella, M. M.; Marques, N. Q.; Riediger, I. N.; Raboni, S.; Coelho, G. M.; Cataneo, A. H. D.; Zanluca, C.; Dos Santos, C. N. D.; Assato, P. A.; Allan da Silva da Costa, F.; Poleti, M. D.; Chagas Lesbon, J. C.; Mattos, E. C.; Banho, C. A.; Sacchetto, L.; Moraes, M. M.; Tommasini Grotto, R. M.; Souza-Neto, J. A.; Nogueira, M. L.; Fukumasu, H.; Coutinho, L. L.; Calado, R. T.; Neto, R. M.; Bispo de Filippis, A. M.; Venancio da Cunha, R.; Freitas, C.; Leonel Peterka, C. R.; Rangel Fernandes, C. F.; de Araújo, W. N.; do Carmo Said, R. F.; Almiron, M.; Campelo de Albuquerque, E. Melo C. F.; Lourenço, J.; de Oliveira, T.; Holmes, E. C.; Haddad, R.; Sampaio, S. C.; Elias, M. C.; Kashima, S.; de Alcantara, L. C. J.; Covas, D. T..
PubMed; 2022.
Preprint in English | PubMed | ID: ppcovidwho-332259

ABSTRACT

Brazil has experienced some of the highest numbers of COVID-19 cases and deaths globally and from May 2021 made Latin America a pandemic epicenter. Although SARS-CoV-2 established sustained transmission in Brazil early in the pandemic, important gaps remain in our understanding of virus transmission dynamics at the national scale. Here, we describe the genomic epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2 using near-full genomes sampled from 27 Brazilian states and a bordering country - Paraguay. We show that the early stage of the pandemic in Brazil was characterised by the co-circulation of multiple viral lineages, linked to multiple importations predominantly from Europe, and subsequently characterized by large local transmission clusters. As the epidemic progressed under an absence of effective restriction measures, there was a local emergence and onward international spread of Variants of Concern (VOC) and Variants Under Monitoring (VUM), including Gamma (P.1) and Zeta (P.2). In addition, we provide a preliminary genomic overview of the epidemic in Paraguay, showing evidence of importation from Brazil. These data reinforce the usefulness and need for the implementation of widespread genomic surveillance in South America as a toolkit for pandemic monitoring that provides a means to follow the real-time spread of emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants with possible implications for public health and immunization strategies.

4.
PubMed; 2022.
Preprint in English | PubMed | ID: ppcovidwho-331303

ABSTRACT

The emergence of the new SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant, which is known to accumulate a huge number of mutations when compared to other variants, brought to light the concern about vaccine escape, especially from the neutralization by antibodies induced by vaccination. In this scenario, we evaluated the impact on antibody neutralization induction, against Omicron variant, by a booster dose of BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine after the CoronaVac primary vaccination scheme. The percentage of seroconverted individuals 30 and 60 days after CoronaVac scheme was 17% and 10%, respectively. After booster dose administration, the seroconvertion rate increased to 76.6%. The neutralization mean titer against Omicron in the CoronaVac protocol decreased over time, but after the booster dose, the mean titer increased 43.1 times, indicating a positive impact of this vaccine combination in the serological immune response.

5.
J Hosp Infect ; 123: 23-26, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1683310

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although the risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission within hospitals has been well recognized, there is a paucity of data on its occurrence. Our aim was to report the incidence of hospital-acquired (HA) COVID-19 at Brazilian hospitals. METHODS: We investigated the incidence of HA COVID-19 in Brazilian hospitals using data from a national surveillance system, from August 2020 through September 2021. Definitions of HA COVID-19 were: (1) symptom onset >14 days after hospital admission plus a positive SARS-CoV-2 RNA or antigen test; (2) symptom onset on days 8-14 after admission, plus a positive SARS-CoV-2 RNA or antigen test positive, plus documented high-risk exposure. We performed descriptive analyses and reported HA COVID-19 rates using pooled mean and percentile distribution. RESULTS: A total of 48,634 cases of HA COVID-19 were reported from 1428 hospitals. Incidence ranged from 0.16/1000 patient-days at neonatal intensive care units (ICUs) to 5.8/1000 patient-days at adult ICUs. The highest incidence of HA COVID-19 was during the months March to July 2021, similar to that which was observed for community-acquired COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: This report provides a national view of the burden of HA COVID-19. The highest incidence of HA COVID-19 similar that which was observed for community-acquired COVID-19. We believe that this reflects the difficulty of implementing preventive measures. Further studies evaluating risk factors for the hospital transmission of SARS-Cov-2 should clarify strategies to minimize the risk of HA COVID-19 and may be applicable to other respiratory diseases. Furthermore, the implementation of a national system to evaluate HA COVID-19 has the potential to shine a light on this problem and lead to interventions in each hospital.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals , Humans , Infant, Newborn , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Research and Practice in Thrombosis and Haemostasis ; 5(SUPPL 2), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1509116

ABSTRACT

Background : COVID-19 patients are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), and this complication leads to a worse prognosis. However, to diagnose VTE on COVID-19 patients is a challenge to physicians, as the symptoms of pulmonary embolism can often be mistaken for the overlapped viral pneumonia. Herein, there is still little information on VTE incidence and associated risk factors specifically for this population. Aims : To assess the incidence and associated risk factors for VTE in hospitalized COVID-19 patients in Brazilian hospitals. Methods : Retrospective multicenter cohort in 15 Brazilian hospitals. Consecutive adult patients (≥ 18 years-old) with laboratoryconfirmed COVID-19 between March and September 2020 were included. Study data were collected from medical records using Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) tools. The study was approved by the National Research Ethics Commission waiving off the application of informed consent. Results : Of 4,021 patients included, 234 (5.8%) had VTE. When comparing VTE and non-VTE groups (Tables 1 and 2), there was no statistical difference in terms of sex and age between groups. The median age was 63 years-old (IQR 51-72 years-old) in VTE group. The most common comorbidities for both groups were hypertension and diabetes. Obesity, chronic pulmonary obstructive disease, previous VTE and recent surgery were more frequent in VTE group. D-dimer, C-reactive protein, lactate dehydrogenase levels and lymphocyte count were higher in the VTE group. Admission to intensive care units (37.6% vs 69.7%;P < 0,001) and in-hospital mortality (19.0% vs 28.3%;P < 0,01) were significantly higher in those who had VTE. Conclusions : Overall, 5.8% of COVID-19 hospitalized patients had VTE. Elevated laboratory values were associated with increased risk of this condition. VTE was associated with higher rates of intensive care admission and in-hospital mortality.

7.
Journal of the Neurological Sciences ; 429, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1466714

ABSTRACT

Background and aims: Although neuropsychiatric manifestations have been reported after COVID-19, little is known about fine motor difficulties after mild infection. We evaluate fine motor impairment, fatigue, depression, anxiety and somnolence after COVID-19. Methods: We applied the 9-hole peg and the “box and blocks” tests to fine motor skills;and Hanoi tower test to evaluate executive functions. Individuals answered the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Chalder fatigue questionnaire (CFQ) and Epworth sleepiness Scale (ESS). We used SPSS26 with Mann-Whitney U-test to compare variables between groups and partial correlations to correlate the continuous variables. Results: We evaluated 23 subjects recovered from COVID-19 (after 4 months from diagnosis) (16 women;median of 39 years)) and 35 healthy controls (23 women;median 33 years) balanced for sex (p = 0.8), age (p = 0.3) and education (p = 0.6). COVID group presented excessive sleepiness (ESS, median 10 points (range 0–18)), and fatigue (CFQ, median 18 points (range 0–32)). Fatigue correlated with depression symptoms (r = 0.5;p = 0.018), with anxiety (r = 0.49;p = 0.021), and with sleepiness (r = 0.4;p = 0.06). COVID group was slower on the 9-Hole Peg Test for dominant (p = 0.004) and non-dominant hands (p = 0.002), and performed poorer on Box and blocks test (p = 0.047). They were slower on the Hanoi Tower test with 3 pieces (p = 0.04). Conclusions: We identified persistent neurological symptoms (mainly fatigue and somnolence) motor slowness and difficulties in patients with mild infection and without hospital treatment. Fatigue associated with other neuropsychiatric symptoms. The longitudinal evaluation and neuroimaging correlations in a larger sample may clarify the duration of deficits and the associated cerebral abnormalities.

8.
City ; 25(3-4):235-254, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1393045

ABSTRACT

In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, masks and the act of masking have become emotive subjects for social and political debate. In Brazil, one of the countries most severely affected by the pandemic, the seemingly mundane act of mask-wearing has become part of a deep social, political and economic crisis at the centre of which is the far-right president Jair Bolsonaro. In this paper we explore the politics of (un)masking in Brazil from three vantage points in which the mask serves to dramatise the country’s current moment. Firstly, we trace the connections and disjunctions between the politics of mask-wearing and the genealogies of hygienist policies associated with the modern aspirations of the Brazilian republic. Secondly, we consider how masks are incorporated into the everyday life of the city through popular economies, which reveal the potentialities and limitations of work beyond the modern ideals of waged labour. Finally, we explore the incorporation of masks in urban street-art. We approach graffiti and murals as situated performances of symbolic resistance that contest and reveal the incoherences of Bolsonaro’s anti-science discourse. In tandem, these three perspectives foreground practices of (un)masking that expose long-standing tensions and new contemporary challenges that characterise the politics of a ‘crisis society’. © 2021 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

9.
International Journal of Environmental Research & Public Health [Electronic Resource] ; 18(7):06, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1209042

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 environmental monitoring can track the rate of viral contamination and can be used to establish preventive measures. This study aimed to detect by RT-PCR the presence of SARS-CoV-2 from inert surface samples in public health settings with a literature review about surface contamination and its burden on spread virus. Samples were collected from health settings in Curitiba, Brazil, between July and December 2020. A literature review was conducted using PRISMA. A total of 711 environmental surface samples were collected from outpatient areas, dental units, doctors' offices, COVID-19 evaluation areas, and hospital units, of which 35 (4.9%) were positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA. The frequency of environmental contamination was higher in primary care units than in hospital settings. The virus was detected on doctors' personal items. Remarkably, the previously disinfected dental chair samples tested positive. These findings agree with those of other studies in which SARS-CoV-2 was found on inanimate surfaces. Detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA on surfaces in public health settings, including those not meant to treat COVID-19, indicates widespread environmental contamination. Therefore, the intensification of disinfection measures for external hospital areas may be important for controlling community COVID-19 dissemination.

10.
European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging ; 22(SUPPL 1):i506, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1185667

ABSTRACT

Background: Repeated echocardiographic assessment of cardiac function is integral in management of intensive care units (ICU) patients. Machine learning (ML) can assist by integrating whole-cardiac cycle echo data derived from flow assessment and deformation imaging, and grouping patients on the basis of patterns of cardiac dysfunction and its evolution over time. Cardiac involvement has been suggested to be important in COVID-19 outcome and echo evaluation can inform on cardiac status. We use unsupervised ML to investigate and integrate longitudinal data from the COVID-HO study (NCT04371679) to determine the potential of tracking changes in cardiac function during ICU hospitalization. Methods: In a single-centre, COVID-19 patients (n = 38) were prospectively followed with echocardiography as part of ICU management. The endpoint was defined as death or ICU discharge. LV myocardial deformation, as well as aortic, mitral and pulmonary artery blood-pool Doppler velocity profiles were used as input for ML. Clinical data was used to validate the ML derived phenotypes. Echo data from the initial and final echo examination were used to create an output space where participants were positioned based on cardiac function blinded to outcome status. Regression was used to estimate the echo and clinical characteristics of different regions in the space. Patient trajectories in the output space were investigated for each patient. Results: Endpoint was not reached in 24% (n = 9) at the time of analysis. The cohort was 68% male, aged 65 ± 12 years, and with an ICU mortality 21% (n = 8). The median spent in ICU was 10 (IQR 7-18) days. The ML analysis demonstrated a heterogeneous output space (Fig 1A) we could define a gradual change in the shape of the pulmonary outflow velocity profile, from a normal towards pulmonary hypertension (Fig 1A, x axis). Jointly with differences in diastolic function (mitral inflow fusion and A wave accentuation) defined two regions: with signs of pulmonary hypertension (gray);and with normal pulmonary pressures but LV diastolic dysfunction (yellow). Investigation of patient trajectories (Fig 1B) demonstrated the feasibility of tracking changes during ICU hospitalization, showing a shift of a patient that died in the ICU, from initial diastolic dysfunction towards pulmonary hypertension (red), and a patient shifting from a region with normal diastolic function towards pulmonary hypertension, but with a positive outcome (blue). Echo data concurs with observed dynamics (Fig 1C and 1D). Conclusion: ML can integrate complex, whole-cardiac cycle echo data to group heterogeneous patients based on similarity of cardiac function. Patient trajectories across the output space demonstrate the feasibility of ML for echo data-based follow-up of patients during ICU hos-pitalization. Further echo and clinical data integration can improve characterisation of the output space regions and better define changes in cardiac function during hospitalization.

12.
Revista de Administracao Publica ; 54(4):1010-1021, 2020.
Article in English, Portuguese | Scopus | ID: covidwho-902141

ABSTRACT

Facing the threat of disruption to the productive sector as a result of social distancing measures imposed in Brazil, and considering that micro and small enterprises are those hardest struck, this study aims to formulate a government emergency aid proposal for this segment. It presents a brief analysis of the federal government’s current actions and proposes a measure capable of filling the gaps observed. Finally, the study offers an estimation of costs for the National Treasury if adopting the proposed measure. © 2020, Fundacao Getulio Vargas. All rights reserved.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL