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1.
Cancer Research, Statistics, and Treatment ; 6(1):52-61, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20242251

ABSTRACT

Background: Older patients with cancer are at a higher risk of invasive infections. Vaccination is an effective approach to decrease the mortality and morbidity associated with infections. Objective(s): Our primary objective was to evaluate the proportion of older patients with cancer who had received routine vaccinations against pneumococcal, influenza, and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Our secondary objective was to identify the factors associated with vaccine uptake such as age, sex, education, marital status, comorbidities, and place of residence. Material(s) and Method(s): This cross-sectional observational study was conducted in the geriatric oncology outpatient clinic of the Department of Medical Oncology at the Tata Memorial Hospital, a tertiary care cancer hospital in Mumbai, India, from February 2020 to January 2023. We included all patients aged >=60 years who were evaluated in the geriatric oncology clinic during the study period and for whom the immunization details were available. The uptake of COVID-19 vaccine was calculated from March 2021 onwards, which was when the COVID-19 vaccine became available to patients aged >=60 years in India. Result(s): We enrolled 1762 patients;1342 (76.2%) were male. The mean age was 68.4 (SD, 5.8) years;795 (45%) patients were from the west zone of India. Only 12 (0.68%) patients had received the pneumococcal vaccine, and 13 (0.7%) had received the influenza vaccine. At least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine had been taken by 1302 of 1562 patients (83.3%). On univariate logistic regression, education, marital status, geographic zone of residence, and primary tumor site were correlated with the uptake of COVID-19 vaccine. Factors associated with a greater COVID-19 vaccine uptake included education (up to Std 10 and higher vs. less than Std 10: Odds Ratio [OR], 1.46;95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-1.99;P = 0.018, and illiterate vs. less than Std 10: OR, 0.70;95% CI, 0.50-0.99;P = 0.041), marital status (unmarried vs. married: OR, 0.27;95% CI, 0.08-1.08;P = 0.046, and widow/widower vs. married: OR, 0.67;95% CI, 0.48-0.94;P = 0.017), lung and gastrointestinal vs. head-and-neck primary tumors (lung cancer vs. head-and-neck cancer: OR, 1.60;95% CI, 1.02-2.47;P = 0.038, and gastrointestinal vs.head-and-neck cancer: OR, 2.18;95% CI, 1.37-3.42;P < 0.001), and place of residence (west zone vs. central India: OR, 0.34;95% CI, 0.13-0.75;P = 0.015). Conclusion(s): Fewer than 1 in 100 older Indian patients with cancer receive routine immunization with influenza and pneumococcal vaccines. Hearteningly, the uptake of COVID-19 vaccination in older Indian patients with cancer is over 80%, possibly due to the global recognition of its importance during the pandemic. Similar measures as those used to increase the uptake of COVID-19 vaccines during the pandemic may be beneficial to increase the uptake of routine vaccinations.Copyright © 2023 Cancer Research, Statistics, and Treatment.

2.
Cancer Research, Statistics, and Treatment ; 5(1):122-130, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20240999
3.
Cancer Research, Statistics, and Treatment ; 5(2):212-219, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20240615

ABSTRACT

Background: During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, established best practices in cancer care were modified to diminish the risk of COVID-19 infection among patients and health-care workers. Objective(s): We aimed to study the modifications in cancer-directed therapy during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. Material(s) and Method(s): A cross-sectional study of patients with cancers of the head and neck, thoracic, urologic, and central nervous systems who visited the medical oncology department of the Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, India, between April 22, 2020 and June 01, 2020, was conducted. Data were prospectively collected in an online pro forma and supplemented from the electronic medical records. Result(s): Of a total of 514 patients, 363 (71%) were men. The most common malignancy was lung cancer in 234 patients (46%). Cancer-directed therapy was modified in 83 patients (16%). Deviations consisted of modification of the chemotherapy regimen (48%), temporary discontinuation of chemotherapy in 37%, and interim chemotherapy to delay surgery in 5%. Changes in the chemotherapy regimen included a shift to a less intensive regimen in 45%, changing from intravenous to oral in 40%, and less frequent dosing of immunotherapy in 7%. Considering missed appointments as a deviation from planned cancer therapy, 68% of patients had a deviation in the standard planned cancer care. Conclusion(s): Almost two-thirds of the patients could not reach the hospital during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown in India. Of those who could reach the hospital, one of out every six patients with cancer had a change in their cancer-directed treatment, half of which consisted of a modification in the standard chemotherapy regimens. The effects of these therapy deviations are likely to be long-lasting. (Clinical Trials Registry-India, CTRI/2020/07/026533).Copyright © 2023 Neurology India, Neurological Society of India Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow.

4.
Cancer Research, Statistics, and Treatment ; 4(2):211-218, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20240614

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with cancer are at a higher risk of severe forms of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and mortality. Therefore, widespread COVID-19 vaccination is required to attain herd immunity. Objective(s): We aimed to evaluate the uptake of the COVID-19 vaccine in Indian patients with cancer and to collect information regarding vaccine hesitancy and factors that contributed to vaccine hesitancy. Material(s) and Method(s): This was a questionnaire-based survey conducted between May 7, 2021 and June 10, 2021 in patients aged 45 years and over, with solid tumors. The primary end points of the study were the proportion of Indian patients with cancer aged 45 years and older who had not received the COVID-19 vaccine, and the reasons why these patients had not received the COVID-19 vaccine. Our secondary end points were the proportion of patients with a history of COVID-19 infection, and the proportion of the patients who had vaccine hesitancy. Additionally, we attempted to assess the factors that could impact vaccine hesitancy. Result(s): A total of 435 patients were included in the study. Of these, 348 (80%) patients had not received even a single dose of the COVID-19 vaccine;66 (15.2%) patients had received the first dose, and 21 (4.8%) had received both the doses. Approximately half (47.1%) of the patients reported that they took the COVID-19 vaccine based on the advice from a doctor. The reasons for not taking the COVID-19 vaccine could be considered as vaccine hesitancy in 259 (77%) patients. The two most common reasons were fear in 124 (38%) patients (fear of side-effects and of the impact of the vaccine on the cancer/therapy) and lack of information in 87 (26.7%) patients. On the multivariate analysis, the two factors found to be significantly associated with vaccine hesitancy were a lower educational level (OR, 1.78;95% CI, 1-3.17;P = 0.048) and a lack of prior advice regarding the COVID-19 vaccine (OR, 2.80;95% CI, 1.73-4.53;P < 0.001). Conclusion(s): Vaccine hesitancy is present in over half of our patients, and the most common reasons are a fear of the vaccine impacting the cancer therapy, fear of side-effects, and lack of information. Widespread vaccination can only be attained if systematic programs for education and dissemination of information regarding the safety and efficacy of the COVID-19 vaccine are given as much importance as fortification of the vaccination supply and distribution system.Copyright © 2021 Cancer Research, Statistics, and Treatment Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow.

5.
Cancer Research, Statistics, and Treatment ; 4(3):568-570, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20231733
6.
Annals of Oncology ; 33:S1608-S1608, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2129916
7.
Cancer Research, Statistics, and Treatment ; 4(3):505-515, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1597784

ABSTRACT

Patients with cancer are at a high risk of morbidity and mortality from infections, due to immune alterations resulting from the underlying malignancy as well as from therapy directed towards it. We aim to review the existing literature on the burden of vaccine-preventable disease, current practices and the efficacy and safety of these vaccines in patients with cancer. We performed a PubMed search for studies on the efficacy and safety of vaccines in patients with cancer, published in English, on or after 2011 to July 2021. Searches were also made in Embase, MEDLINE, Cochrane CENTRAL, and Google Scholar. Articles for which the full text was not available, non-human studies, and those that were not in English were excluded. We screened 92 studies, and excluded 49 as they were focused on children, articles about therapeutic cancer vaccines, and vaccination in healthy populations or patients with non-malignant conditions. Finally, 43 studies were included. Most studies have shown commonly administered vaccines to be safe, with some diminution of antibody response and efficacy but with overall benefit, including mortality benefit in some cases. The key point in the vaccination of patients with cancer was found to be appropriate timing, which according to most of the existing literature appears to be before the initiation of chemotherapy or in between cycles. There is however a dearth of good literature, opening up a new area for potential research. © 2021 Cancer Research, Statistics, and Treatment. All rights reserved.

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