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1.
Digital health ; 8, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1970648

ABSTRACT

The current study sought to characterize commentary regarding intimate partner violence during the COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic via the Twitter hashtags #DomesticAbuse and #DomesticViolence. A sample of 481 original, English-language tweets containing the hashtag #DomesticAbuse or #DomesticViolence posted across five consecutive weekdays from March 22 to March 27, 2020—during which many places were enacting lockdown mandates—was examined using thematic content analyses. Overall, Twitter users commented on potential increased rates of IPV, while adding details about abuse tactics that could be employed by perpetrators during the pandemic. Additionally, Twitter users disclosed personal experiences of IPV victimization. Four themes were identified, including (1) type of domestic violence (i.e. whether the violence was COVID-specific or general domestic violence), (2) commentary about IPV (i.e. general reflections, decentralizing and centralizing survivorhood), (3) perpetrator tactic (i.e. abuse tactic used by the perpetrator), and (4) institutions responsible (i.e. institutions responsible for providing services to survivors). Overall, the commentary on Twitter reflected an effort to raise awareness and share informational aid for potential victims/survivors of IPV. Data highlight the potential of social media networks in conveniently facilitating the sharing and spreading of useful resources to other users. Future research should examine whether resources shared via Twitter reach individuals who need them and empower individuals to garner support.

2.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(6): e35804, 2022 06 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1910894

ABSTRACT

Social media integration into research has increased, and 92% of American social media participants state they would share their data with researchers. Yet, the potential of these data to transform health outcomes has not been fully realized, and the way clinical research is performed has been held back. The use of these technologies in research is dependent on the investigators' awareness of their potential and their ability to innovate within regulatory and institutional guidelines. The Brown-Lifespan Center for Digital Health has launched an initiative to address these challenges and provide a helpful framework to expand social media use in clinical research.


Subject(s)
Social Media , Humans , Longevity , United States
3.
JMIR Ment Health ; 8(9): e26029, 2021 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409797

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Between 15% and 70% of adolescents report experiencing cybervictimization. Cybervictimization is associated with multiple negative consequences, including depressed mood. Few validated, easily disseminated interventions exist to prevent cybervictimization and its consequences. With over 97% of adolescents using social media (such as YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, or Snapchat), recruiting and delivering a prevention intervention through social media and apps may improve accessibility of prevention tools for at-risk youth. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of and obtain preliminary outcome data on IMPACT (Intervention Media to Prevent Adolescent Cyber-Conflict Through Technology), a brief, remote app-based intervention to prevent and reduce the effect of cyberbullying. METHODS: From January 30, 2020, to May 3, 2020, a national sample of 80 adolescents with a history of past-year cybervictimization was recruited through Instagram for a randomized control trial of IMPACT, a brief, remote research assistant-led intervention and a fully automated app-based program, versus enhanced web-based resources (control). Feasibility and acceptability were measured by consent, daily use, and validated surveys. Although not powered for efficacy, outcomes (victimization, bystander self-efficacy, and well-being) were measured using validated measures at 8 and 16 weeks and evaluated using a series of longitudinal mixed models. RESULTS: Regarding feasibility, 24.5% (121/494) of eligible participants provided contact information; of these, 69.4% (84/121) completed full enrollment procedures. Of the participants enrolled, 45% (36/80) were randomized into the IMPACT intervention and 55% (44/80) into the enhanced web-based resources groups. All participants randomized to the intervention condition completed the remote intervention session, and 89% (77/80) of the daily prompts were answered. The retention rate was 99% (79/80) at 8 weeks and 96% (77/80) at 16 weeks for all participants. Regarding acceptability, 100% (36/36) of the intervention participants were at least moderately satisfied with IMPACT overall, and 92% (33/36) of the participants were at least moderately satisfied with the app. At both 8 and 16 weeks, well-being was significantly higher (ß=1.17, SE 0.87, P=.02 at 8 weeks and ß=3.24, SE 0.95, P<.001 at 16 weeks) and psychological stress was lower (ß=-.66, SE 0.08, P=.04 at 8 weeks and ß=-.89, SE 0.09, P<.001 at 16 weeks) among IMPACT users than among control group users. Participants in the intervention group attempted significantly more bystander interventions than those in the control group at 8 weeks (ß=.82, SE 0.42; P=.02). CONCLUSIONS: This remote app-based intervention for victims of cyberbullying was feasible and acceptable, increased overall well-being and bystander interventions, and decreased psychological stress. Our findings are especially noteworthy given that the trial took place during the COVID-19 pandemic. The use of Instagram to recruit adolescents can be a successful strategy for identifying and intervening with those at the highest risk of cybervictimization. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04259216; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04259216.

4.
Brown University Child & Adolescent Behavior Letter ; 37(8):1-6, 2021.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1350754
6.
Brown University Child & Adolescent Behavior Letter ; 37(6):1-6, 2021.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1219883

ABSTRACT

Social media platforms provide users with access to constant communication through sharing thoughts, updating relationship statuses, posting comments, sharing pictures and videos, direct messaging, and viewing and reacting to information posted by those in their ever‐growing social networks. Even before the COVID‐19 pandemic, 97% of adolescents and 72% of adults in the United States reported using some form of social media (Anderson & Jiang, 2018), representing a pervasive shift in the ways that individuals experience their social environment. Particularly among those who are not themselves "digital natives" (individuals raised with pervasive technology), there has been much interest and often concern about adolescent experiences online, and how online interactions may uniquely impact self‐critical thoughts, interfere with emotional well‐being, or influence psychological distress. Is it all negative, or can social media provide growth and comfort, too? In an effort to answer these crucial questions, we need to know about the content and patterns of adolescent social media use.

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