Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 8 de 8
Filter
1.
Handbook of Research on Education Institutions, Skills, and Jobs in the Digital Era ; : 145-166, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2201311

ABSTRACT

Through interactive technologies, virtual internships provide students with supervised opportunities to apply their academic knowledge. Virtual internships represent an underserved and emerging space for conceptual and practical enquiry. Drawing from key stakeholder perspectives, this chapter explores the contribution of virtual internships to the employability of hospitality management students. The benefits and challenges of virtual internships are examined. The salience of this research is amplified by the economic and societal impacts emanating from the COVID-19 pandemic. In the face of pandemic-induced lockdowns, universities converted face-to-face learning and teaching online. This pivot was particularly challenging from a work-integrated learning (WIL) perspective. Students completing internships were required to retreat from the office to the online sphere or their internships and experiential learning opportunities ended abruptly;the significance of which induced the chapter focus. © 2023, IGI Global.

2.
Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease ; 52:102540, 2023.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2165905

ABSTRACT

With the emergence of SARS-CoV-2 and now monkeypox, the UK Defence Medical Services have been required to provide rapid advice in the management of patients with airborne high consequence infectious diseases (A-HCID). The Defence Public Health Network (DPHN) cadre, consisting of closely aligned uniformed and civilian public health specialists have worked at pace to provide evidence-based recommendations on the clinical management, public health response and policy for monkeypox, with military medicine and pathology clinicians (primarily infectious disease physicians and medical microbiologists). Military environments can be complicated and nuanced requiring specialist input and advice to non-specialists as well as unit commanders both in the UK and overseas. DPHN and military infection clinicians have close links with the UK National Health Service (NHS) and the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA), allowing for a dynamic two-way relationship that encompasses patient management, public health response, research and development of both UK military and national guidelines. This is further demonstrated with the Royal Air Force (RAF) Air Transport Isolator (ATI) capability, provided by Defence to support the UK Government and UKHSA. Military infectious disease clinicians are also embedded within NHS A-HCID units. In this manuscript we provide examples of the close interdisciplinary working of the DPHN and Defence clinicians in managing military monkeypox patients, co-ordinating the public health response, advising the Command and developing monkeypox policy for Defence through cross-government partnership. We also highlight the co-operation between civilian and military medical authorities in managing the current outbreak.

3.
West Indian Medical Journal ; 70(Supplement 1):45, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2083509

ABSTRACT

Objective: 1. To identify training gaps in junior clerkship rotations during the COVID-19 pandemic. 2. To develop a Clinical Transition Selective Clerkship (CTSC) during Year 4. 3. To seek student feedback on organization and management of the CTSC. Design and Methods: An online cross-sectional survey of medical students was conducted during June-September 2021 to identify training gaps. In response to identified gaps, the 4-week CTSC was developed to provide further opportunities to develop core competencies. Result(s): Just under half of students reported the opportunity to observe (45.7%) and perform (44.5%) core skills >3 times during the medicine junior clerkship. For the surgical clerkship, 48.3% observed and 44.2% performed core skills 1-3 times. For child health, 39.6% observed and 34.8% performed skills 1-3 times. More than half of respondents (55.3%) expressed concern that they missed the usual clinical clerkship training experiences during online rotations. Three-quarters (74.5%) expressed the need to acquire additional clinical experience. The majority of students rated the following aspects of the CTSC as 'Good' or better: clarity of goals and objectives (58.3%);educational value/amount learned (56.2%);professionalism of faculty (66.7%) and other clinical staff (75%);usefulness of feedback (75%);workload challenge/level of material appropriate (70.8%);overall rating/quality of CTS (60.4%). However, the following aspects were rated as 'Poor' or "Fair": organization and coherency (77.1%);commitment of coordinators (64.6%);CTS achieved stated goals (62.5%). Conclusion(s): Our study identified training gaps in junior clerkship rotations during the COVID-19 pandemic. The CTSC provided opportunities to develop clinical competencies disrupted by the pandemic.

5.
2022 Systems and Information Engineering Design Symposium, SIEDS 2022 ; : 134-138, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1961422

ABSTRACT

Student well-being has been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Albemarle County Public Schools (ACPS) has collected a significant and varied amount of K-12 student data throughout COVID-19. Researchers seek to utilize the student data to drive evidence-based policy changes with regard to ACPS student well-being. A structured data system for performing school-related research associated with the well-being of students throughout the pandemic does not exist. We have designed a sustainable, relational data structure for data consolidation and to advance the ongoing research initiatives related to COVID-19 student well-being in collaboration with ACPS. The data structure aims to play an important role in promoting student well-being policies through simplifying data collection, enhancing analysis, and acting as an ongoing tool that can support future phases of research. The design architecture includes a relational database populated with de-identified student data to be hosted in the cloud. Design implementation includes data cleaning, data preprocessing, populating the database, and querying data for validation. Specialized queries are utilized to answer the early questions posed to the data. Validation testing is performed to confirm the database is working as expected. Details of the data pipeline, validation, best data practices, and database design are discussed in the paper. © 2022 IEEE.

6.
Eurosurveillance ; 27(4), 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1717331

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Immunoassays targeting different SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies are employed for seroprevalence studies. The degree of variability between immunoassays targeting anti-nucleocapsid (anti-NP;the majority) vs the potentially neutralising anti-spike antibodies (including anti-receptor-binding domain;anti-RBD), particularly in mild or asymptomatic disease, remains unclear. Aims We aimed to explore variability in anti-NP and anti-RBD antibody detectability following mild symptomatic or asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection and analyse antibody response for correlation with symptomatology. Methods A multicentre prospective cross-sectional study was undertaken (April-July 2020). Paired serum samples were tested for anti-NP and anti-RBD IgG antibodies and reactivity expressed as binding ratios (BR). Multivariate linear regression was performed analysing age, sex, time since onset, symptomatology, anti-NP and anti-RBD antibody BR. Results We included 906 adults. Antibody results (793/906;87.5%;95% confidence interval: 85.2-89.6) and BR strongly correlated (p = 0.75). PCR-confirmed cases were more frequently identified by anti-RBD (129/130) than anti-NP (123/130). Anti-RBD testing identified 83 of 325 (25.5%) cases otherwise reported as negative for anti-NP. Anti-NP presence (+1.75/unit increase;p < 0.001), fever ( 38..C;+1.81;p < 0.001) or anosmia (+1.91;p < 0.001) were significantly associated with increased anti-RBD BR. Age (p = 0.85), sex (p = 0.28) and cough (p = 0.35) were not. When time since symptom onset was considered, we did not observe a significant change in anti-RBD BR (p = 0.95) but did note decreasing anti-NP BR (p < 0.001). Conclusion SARS-CoV-2 anti-RBD IgG showed significant correlation with anti-NP IgG for absolute seroconversion and BR. Higher BR were seen in symptomatic individuals, particularly those with fever. Inter-assay variability (12.5%) was evident and raises considerations for optimising seroprevalence testing strategies/studies.

7.
European Business Review ; 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1105081

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the effects and ways to confront the devastating effects of the COVID-19 crisis and develop a theoretical framework to facilitate understanding of these aspects from the perspective of micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs). In doing so, the fundamental insights of entrepreneurial self-efficacy, bricolage and improvisation are considered. Design/methodology/approach: The study draws on data from 56 business owners-managers operating in eight different nations and representing three geographical regions;the data were gathered through an online questionnaire. Findings: Various differences in responses from participants operating in the featured geographical settings were revealed. For instance, whereas a higher percentage of South American participants acknowledged financial impacts, they and their European counterparts were also more engaged. Originality/value: The study provides various original and valuable elements. First, by gathering data from business owners-managers operating in different countries and geographical regions, it provides an international perspective concerning ways in which business operators confront an extreme event. Second, and related to the previous point, the study focusses on a business group (MSMEs), which is fundamental for many nations’ economies. Moreover, the experiences of MSMEs could be timely and insightful to industry and business stakeholders. Third, the proposed theoretical framework highlights various emerging dimensions associated with adaptation and responsiveness, with both theoretical and practical implications. © 2021, Emerald Publishing Limited.

8.
BMJ Mil Health ; 167(4): 280-286, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1052317

ABSTRACT

For most individuals residing in Northwestern Europe, maintaining replete vitamin D status throughout the year is unlikely without vitamin D supplementation and deficiency remains common. Military studies have investigated the association with vitamin D status, and subsequent supplementation, with the risk of stress fractures particularly during recruit training. The expression of nuclear vitamin D receptors and vitamin D metabolic enzymes in immune cells additionally provides a rationale for the potential role of vitamin D in maintaining immune homeostasis. One particular area of interest has been in the prevention of acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs). The aims of this review were to consider the evidence of vitamin D supplementation in military populations in the prevention of ARTIs, including SARS-CoV-2 infection and consequent COVID-19 illness. The occupational/organisational importance of reducing transmission of SARS-CoV-2, especially where infected young adults may be asymptomatic, presymptomatic or paucisymptomatic, is also discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Military Personnel , Vitamin D/therapeutic use , Vitamins/therapeutic use , Humans , Respiratory Tract Infections/prevention & control , Vitamin D Deficiency/complications , Vitamin D Deficiency/drug therapy
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL