Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 7 de 7
Filter
1.
Fertility and Sterility ; 118(4 Supplement):e34, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2086207

ABSTRACT

Objective: The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has been associated with greater risk of infection and severe complication in solid organ transplant recipients compared to the general population, yet sparse data exists on the effect of COVID-19 on uterus transplant (UTx) recipients. Though immunosuppressed individuals, including organ transplant recipients, experience higher rates of morbidity and mortality following COVID-19 infection, vaccination for COVID-19 has been shown to effectively reduce mortality for these patients. Despite these encouraging results, and statements from professional societies including ASRM recommending vaccination, vaccine hesitancy remains elevated in the infertility population. The goal of this report is to provide details regarding COVID-19 infection and vaccination rates in UTx recipients in the US. Material(s) and Method(s): We performed a retrospective cohort analysis on individuals who have undergone UTx as of March 2021 in the US. Five UTx recipients at two centers (Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas, and Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) were diagnosed with COVID-19 infection as defined by the presence of a positive SARS-CoV-2 on reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing from a nasopharyngeal swab. Data collected included demographic features, transplant history, transplant-related complications, vaccination status and pregnancy history. Result(s): The median time from transplant to diagnosis of COVID-19 was 22.8 months. Despite the availability of the COVID-19 vaccine, only one out of 5 UTx recipients was vaccinated at the time of diagnosis. Two recipients were pregnant at the time of diagnosis, one in the first trimester and one in the second trimester of pregnancy. One recipient experienced COVID reinfection three months following the first infection. All COVID positive UTx recipients experienced no or mild symptoms;one recipient was asymptomatic, 4 had nasal congestion, 2 had headaches, and one patient was febrile. Four recipients received Casirivimab-imdevimab. In 80% of patients, no changes were made to patients' immunosuppression regimens. Conclusion(s): All UTx recipients who were diagnosed with COVID-19 infection as of 3/2021 recovered without complications. As in other infertility patients, vaccine hesitancy remains a significant concern despite the UTx population having a higher risk of severe disease. Data continues to accrue demonstrating the safety of vaccination in pregnancy, and communication of these results to the UTx population is essential to promote maternal and child health. Impact Statement: This data provides reassuring information regarding outcomes for COVID-19 infection in UTx population;however also demonstrate that similar to other pregnant patients or patients with infertility, vaccine hesitancy remains a significant issue. Copyright © 2022

2.
Neurology ; 98(18 SUPPL), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1925420

ABSTRACT

Objective: To describe the occurrence of acute cerebellar ataxia after COVID-19 infection in a 5- year-old boy. Background: Neurologic manifestations can occur in many adult patients with COVID-19 but are less frequently described in the literature than the respiratory or inflammatory effects of the disease. There are even fewer reports of the neurologic manifestations of the disease in children. Design/Methods: A 5-year-old boy with type I diabetes mellitus was exposed to a COVID-19 positive classmate in school. He tested positive for the SARS-CoV-2 virus and developed mild symptoms including rhinorrhea and decreased energy. Eight days later he developed acute ataxia, double vision, tremor and dysmetria. He was admitted to the hospital for further evaluation. Results: He had hyperglycemia at presentation, however labs were not consistent with diabetic ketoacidosis. Nasopharyngeal swab for SARS-CoV-2 was positive by polymerase chain reaction, and SARS-CoV-2 IgG nucleocapsid antibody testing was positive in serum. Cerebrospinal fluid showed white blood cells 8 cells/uL, red blood cells 0 cells/uL, protein 20 mg/dL and glucose 110 mg/dL. Other infectious testing in the CSF was negative including CSF testing for SARS-CoV-2. Brain magnetic resonance imaging with and without contrast was normal. The patient was treated with supportive care and discharged home after 4 days. Symptoms gradually improved and resolved at 2 month follow up. Conclusions: Acute cerebellar ataxia can be seen in children, often following a viral infection. Rare reports have described acute ataxia in adults recovering from COVID-19. Only one case report has previously described acute cerebellar ataxia in a pediatric patient of 13 years (Tomar et al 2021). Providers should be aware of acute cerebellar ataxia as a possible sequela in pediatric patients recovering from COVID-19.

3.
Annals of Behavioral Medicine ; 56(SUPP 1):S98-S98, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1849065
4.
Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity ; : 10, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1665685

ABSTRACT

Public Significance Statement The current study explored the ways that housing and employment instability brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic contributed to heightened psychological distress among a sample of transgender and gender diverse (TGD) individuals collected using an online survey platform. Our findings indicate that TGD individuals experienced heightened levels of psychological distress directly related to employment and housing instability which is a crucial and timely concern given that TGD individuals experienced greater psychological distress, unemployment, and housing instability relative to the general population prior to the pandemic. Receiving a COVID-19 diagnosis or experiencing symptoms associated with COVID-19 also predicted heightened levels of psychological distress. It is recommended that additional TGD-specific protections be implemented and expanded upon in order to meet the current and impending needs of TGD individuals. Transgender and gender diverse (TGD) individuals are faced with various societal factors that contribute to health disparities. As COVID-19 spreads, health disparities that existed prior to the pandemic have become exacerbated. The current study aims to address factors that may be negatively impacting TGD individuals during the COVID-19 pandemic by exploring their experiences related to symptoms of depression, symptoms of anxiety, employment, and housing. TGD participants (N = 342) were recruited from an online participant recruitment platform and answered questions related to their psychological well-being and changes in employment and housing since the start of the pandemic. Adverse changes in employment since the start of the pandemic were reported by almost 1/3 of participants and were associated with higher depression and anxiety. Changes in housing were reported by almost 1/4 of participants and were associated with higher anxiety. Experiencing COVID-19 symptoms or receiving a COVID-19 diagnosis were also associated with higher anxiety. Findings indicate TGD individuals who experienced changes in employment and housing since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic experience greater levels of psychological distress. Findings may inform mental health providers and policymakers on the repercussions the pandemic has had on TGD individuals.

5.
Journal of Immunology ; 206:1, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1548656
6.
Annals of Behavioral Medicine ; 55:S311-S311, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1250719
7.
Annals of Emergency Medicine ; 76(4):S64, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-898406

ABSTRACT

Study Objectives: Alcohol is associated with increased risk of hypertension and diabetes, which are associated with increased morbidity and mortality from COVID-19, as are opioids and methamphetamine. Our institution has a Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) program in 18 emergency departments (EDs), 14 inpatient hospitals, and 5 primary care sites to universally address substance use with patients as part of usual care. As our region has a high prevalence of COVID-19, we had to minimize staff presence in the ED, including health coaches and social workers who normally work with patients with a positive SBIRT screen. The COVID-19 crisis demanded innovation;we implemented a “Telephonic SBIRT” (T-SBIRT) model to continue to address patients’ substance use in the context of physical and mental health while minimizing in-person interactions. Methods: Due to regulations regarding “non-essential” staff, 11 SBIRT Health Coaches were removed from their ED and primary care sites. Health Coaches were assigned to T-SBIRT where a central phone number forwards to the mobile phone of the remote health coach on duty. Shifts cover 8am-12am, 7 days per week. We developed a flyer with the services, hours, and phone number and broadly disseminated to ED chairs, primary care providers, nurse managers, all hospital social workers, the Health Home team, and others via virtual meetings and email. We developed a HIPAA-compliant Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) form for Health Coaches to use to document services, including the questions for AUDIT (alcohol) and DAST-10 (drug) full screens and checkboxes for brief interventions, referrals to treatment, and virtual resources provided (AA/NA, BottleCap for reducing alcohol use, tobacco cessation, etc). We developed a system via REDCap where the Health Coach emailed the caller the resource list from a central email address in real time. Finally, we developed a REDCap form to virtually obtain HIPAA consent to enroll participants in our substance use disorder care navigation program (Project CONNECT). Results: In 13 weeks, we had 422 phone calls, 228 (54%) incoming, 190 (45%) outgoing, and 4 (1%) voicemails. 108 (26%) of calls were with patients, 13 (3%) with family/friends, 224 (53%) with staff members, and 79 (19%) with treatment providers. Calls stemmed from 14 hospitals, 2 primary care practices, and Health Home. We worked with 69 unique staff members and 94 unique patient cases, 75 (81%) male, 20 (19%) female, and 7 (8%) in Spanish. We provided 73 full screens, (91% high-risk), 47 brief interventions, referrals for 84 patients, emailed virtual resources to 40 individuals, and enrolled 16 patients in Project CONNECT. Conclusion: We were able to have a health coach provide T-SBIRT services for patients from sites that do not normally have a health coach, and cover weekends and later hours. Since calls received were for patients with high-risk substance use in need of a referral to substance use disorder treatment, more frontline provider education is needed on the ability of the T-SBIRT Team to address the full spectrum of substance use, not just high-risk substance use. In conclusion, T-SBIRT is a model that we plan to sustain to continually expand reach, and to provide services to address substance use as part of usual care with patients at more locations than we could otherwise physically staff.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL