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2.
PUBMED; 2021.
Preprint in English | PUBMED | ID: ppcovidwho-293057

ABSTRACT

Background: To reduce the coronavirus disease burden in England, along with many other countries, the Government implemented a package of non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) that have also impacted other transmissible infectious diseases such as norovirus. It is unclear what future norovirus disease incidence is likely to look like upon lifting these restrictions. Methods: Here we use a mathematical model of norovirus fitted to community incidence data in England to project forward expected incidence based on contact surveys that have been collected throughout 2020-2021. Results: We report that susceptibility to norovirus infection has likely increased between March 2020 to mid-2021. Depending upon assumptions of future contact patterns incidence of norovirus that is similar to pre-pandemic levels or an increase beyond what has been previously reported is likely to occur once restrictions are lifted. Should adult contact patterns return to 80% of pre-pandemic levels the incidence of norovirus will be similar to previous years. If contact patterns return to pre-pandemic levels there is a potential for the expected annual incidence to be up to 2-fold larger than in a typical year. The age-specific incidence is similar across all ages. Conclusions: Continued national surveillance for endemic diseases such as norovirus will be essential after NPIs are lifted to allow healthcare services to adequately prepare for a potential increase in cases and hospital pressures beyond what is typically experienced.

3.
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine ; 203(9):1, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1407127
4.
Ir Med J ; 114(7):410, 2021.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-1405693

ABSTRACT

Aim To gain an understanding of the impact of COVID-19 on the daily life, healthcare needs, mental wellbeing and outlook of patients with Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD) and their caregivers. Methods ILD patients and caregivers were invited to participate in a quantitative survey. Respondents could self-select to then participate in in-depth structured telephone interviews. Survey data was compared to Department of Health COVID-19 public opinion tracker findings for the comparable time period. Results There were 170 survey respones (111 patients and 59 caregivers) and 14 in-depth interview participants. 32% (n=36) of patients and 42% (n=25) of caregivers expressed extreme worry regarding COVID-19 on a 1-10 scale. 83% (n=92) of patients expressed concern about safe hospital access, 33% (n=37) had received a telephone consultation with their clinician, 43% (n=48) reported test delays, 47% (n=52) were exercising less, 23% (n=26) reported worse sleep and 15% (n=17) reported being financially worse off. Carers reported that sleep was worse for 58% (n=34), 42% (n=25) reported being worse off financially, and 40% (n=24) reported a worse diet. Worry (66%, n=39), stress (51%, n=30), anxiety (49%, n=29) were commonly reported by carers. Discussion ILD patients and caregivers reported higher levels of worry regarding COVID-19 compared to the general public. Alternative pathways for quality ILD patient care and interventions to reduce the burden of care on ILD caregivers are required.

5.
Irish Medical Journal ; 114(5), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1326322

ABSTRACT

We examined the impact of COVID-19 on the daily lives, mental wellbeing, training and support needs of healthcare professionals (HCPs) working in interstitial lung disease (ILD), and implications for ILD patient care. We invited ILD HCPs to participate in a quantitative survey, following which respondents (n=49) self-selected to participate in structured telephone interviews (n=9). Worry (43%, n=21) and frustration (43%, n=21) were the most commonly reported emotions by survey respondents. Interviewees reported significant impacts on their daily lives and mental wellbeing. Few of the interviewees had received self-care (n=1, 11%) or mental healthcare training (n=2, 22%). Wellbeing supports were available, but interviewees reported deprioritising self-care. Interviewees reported concern about the impact of appointment cancellations on ILD patients. Virtual clinics were considered useful, but interviewees reported some limitations. COVID-19 profoundly impacted the daily lives and mental wellbeing of ILD HCPs and affected ILD care delivery, with implications for occupational health, HCP training and ILD patient services.

6.
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine ; 203(9), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1277146

ABSTRACT

Rationale: A total of 60,287 (1,267/100,000) cases of Covid-19 (SARS-CoV-2) were recorded in Ireland by 30 October 2020. An important strategy to free up in-hospital capacity was development of a remote monitoring platform to support at-home care or early discharge of lower-risk patients with mild/moderate Covid-19 symptoms. Methods: The monitoring platform consisted of a patient-facing app + pulse oximeter (Bluetoothconnected Nonin 3230) enabling patients to record symptoms (e.g. breathlessness, diarrhea;severity rated on a 10-point scale), temperature & oxygen saturation (SpO2). Patients were prompted to record measurement 4 times/day. Patient-recorded data was viewed in real time by their healthcare centre via a dedicated web-based monitoring portal. Criteria for remote monitoring included: Covid-19 symptoms, positive for SARS-CoV-2, young age, absence of serious concomitant conditions, need for continued observation post-discharge. Treatment centres emailed app installation instructions and supplied a pulse oximeter to their patients. Treatment centres & patients received alerts if pulse oximetry values crossed pre-defined thresholds. Results: Between 13 March and 31 October 2020, 1,045 patients at 8 primary & 15 secondary care centres had used the remote monitoring platform [median duration: 13 days (interquartile range 10-23 days)]. 11 patients were admitted to hospital and 12 previously hospitalized patients were readmitted. 933 patients (89%) gave consent to use of their pseudonymised data for research. Symptoms and physiological markers of severity of infection varied considerably. 871 patients recorded breathlessness data with 53 rating severity as 6/10 and 23 as 8/10. 300 patients recorded diarrhea data with 24 rating severity as 6/10 and 6 as 8/10 (see Figure). SpO2 data were available for 907 patients. 733 patients reported SpO2 94-96%, 334 reported SpO2 92-93%and 265 patients reported SpO2 ≤91% at least once during the monitoring period. Conclusions: Remote monitoring of Covid-19 in appropriate patients can free up in-hospital capacity. The majority of these patients were willing to provide pseudonymised data to support research on Covid-19. .

7.
Irish Journal of Medical Science ; 190(SUPPL 1):S5-S5, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1063751
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