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1.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 31(2): 106217, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1540804

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has been associated with an increased incidence of ischemic stroke. The use echocardiography to characterize the risk of ischemic stroke in patients hospitalized with COVID-19 has not been explored. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study of 368 patients hospitalized between 3/1/2020 and 5/31/2020 who had laboratory-confirmed infection with SARS-CoV-2 and underwent transthoracic echocardiography during hospitalization. Patients were categorized according to the presence of ischemic stroke on cerebrovascular imaging following echocardiography. Ischemic stroke was identified in 49 patients (13.3%). We characterized the risk of ischemic stroke using a novel composite risk score of clinical and echocardiographic variables: age <55, systolic blood pressure >140 mmHg, anticoagulation prior to admission, left atrial dilation and left ventricular thrombus. RESULTS: Patients with ischemic stroke had no difference in biomarkers of inflammation and hypercoagulability compared to those without ischemic stroke. Patients with ischemic stroke had significantly more left atrial dilation and left ventricular thrombus (48.3% vs 27.9%, p = 0.04; 4.2% vs 0.7%, p = 0.03). The unadjusted odds ratio of the composite novel COVID-19 Ischemic Stroke Risk Score for the likelihood of ischemic stroke was 4.1 (95% confidence interval 1.4-16.1). The AUC for the risk score was 0.70. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 Ischemic Stroke Risk Score utilizes clinical and echocardiographic parameters to robustly estimate the risk of ischemic stroke in patients hospitalized with COVID-19 and supports the use of echocardiography to characterize the risk of ischemic stroke in patients hospitalized with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Brain/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/complications , Echocardiography/methods , Ischemic Stroke/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Stroke/prevention & control , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Female , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Thrombosis
2.
J Am Coll Cardiol ; 76(18): 2043-2055, 2020 11 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-887081

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Myocardial injury is frequent among patients hospitalized with coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) and is associated with a poor prognosis. However, the mechanisms of myocardial injury remain unclear and prior studies have not reported cardiovascular imaging data. OBJECTIVES: This study sought to characterize the echocardiographic abnormalities associated with myocardial injury and their prognostic impact in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: We conducted an international, multicenter cohort study including 7 hospitals in New York City and Milan of hospitalized patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 who had undergone transthoracic echocardiographic (TTE) and electrocardiographic evaluation during their index hospitalization. Myocardial injury was defined as any elevation in cardiac troponin at the time of clinical presentation or during the hospitalization. RESULTS: A total of 305 patients were included. Mean age was 63 years and 205 patients (67.2%) were male. Overall, myocardial injury was observed in 190 patients (62.3%). Compared with patients without myocardial injury, those with myocardial injury had more electrocardiographic abnormalities, higher inflammatory biomarkers and an increased prevalence of major echocardiographic abnormalities that included left ventricular wall motion abnormalities, global left ventricular dysfunction, left ventricular diastolic dysfunction grade II or III, right ventricular dysfunction and pericardial effusions. Rates of in-hospital mortality were 5.2%, 18.6%, and 31.7% in patients without myocardial injury, with myocardial injury without TTE abnormalities, and with myocardial injury and TTE abnormalities. Following multivariable adjustment, myocardial injury with TTE abnormalities was associated with higher risk of death but not myocardial injury without TTE abnormalities. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with COVID-19 who underwent TTE, cardiac structural abnormalities were present in nearly two-thirds of patients with myocardial injury. Myocardial injury was associated with increased in-hospital mortality particularly if echocardiographic abnormalities were present.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Heart/diagnostic imaging , Myocardium/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction/virology , Aged , Betacoronavirus , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 , Coronary Angiography , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Echocardiography , Electrocardiography , Female , Heart/physiopathology , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
3.
J Am Coll Cardiol ; 76(5): 628-629, 2020 08 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-667383
4.
BMJ Case Rep ; 13(9)2020 Sep 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-751541

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has challenged all medical professionals to optimise non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIV) as a means of limiting intubation. We present a case of a middle-aged man with a voluminous beard for religious reasons who developed progressive hypoxic respiratory failure secondary to COVID-19 infection which became refractory to NIV. After gaining permission to trim the patient's facial hair by engaging with the patient, his family and religious leaders, his mask fit objectively improved, his hypoxaemia markedly improved and an unnecessary intubation was avoided. Trimming of facial hair should be considered in all patients on NIV who might have any limitations with mask fit and seal that would hamper ventilation, including patients who have facial hair for religious reasons.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Care/methods , Noninvasive Ventilation/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Aged , Brain Diseases/etiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Hair , Humans , Intubation, Intratracheal , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Religion and Medicine , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Tracheostomy
5.
Pacing Clin Electrophysiol ; 43(10): 1139-1148, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-729341

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Recent studies have described several cardiovascular manifestations of COVID-19 including myocardial ischemia, myocarditis, thromboembolism, and malignant arrhythmias. However, to our knowledge, syncope in COVID-19 patients has not been systematically evaluated. We sought to characterize syncope and/or presyncope in COVID-19. METHODS: This is a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 with either syncope or presyncope. This "study" group (n = 37) was compared with an age and gender-matched cohort of patients without syncope ("control") (n = 40). Syncope was attributed to various categories. We compared telemetry data, treatments received, and clinical outcomes between the two groups. RESULTS: Among 1000 COVID-19 patients admitted to the Mount Sinai Hospital, the incidence of syncope/presyncope was 3.7%. The median age of the entire cohort was 69 years (range 26-89+ years) and 55% were men. Major comorbidities included hypertension, diabetes, and coronary artery disease. Syncopal episodes were categorized as (a) unspecified in 59.4% patients, (b) neurocardiogenic in 15.6% patients, (c) hypotensive in 12.5% patients, and (d) cardiopulmonary in 3.1% patients with fall versus syncope and seizure versus syncope in 2 of 32 (6.3%) and 1 of 33 (3.1%) patients, respectively. Compared with the "control" group, there were no significant differences in both admission and peak blood levels of d-dimer, troponin-I, and CRP in the "study" group. Additionally, there were no differences in arrhythmias or death between both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Syncope/presyncope in patients hospitalized with COVID-19 is uncommon and is infrequently associated with a cardiac etiology or associated with adverse outcomes compared to those who do not present with these symptoms.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Syncope/virology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Syncope/epidemiology , Telemetry
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