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5.
Int J Cardiol Heart Vasc ; 40: 100950, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1729806

ABSTRACT

Background: Infection with the SARS-CoV-2 virus can lead to myocardial injury, evidenced by increases in specific biomarkers and imaging. Objective: To quantify the association between biomarkers of myocardial injury, coagulation, and severe COVID-19 and death in hospitalized patients. Methods: Studies were identified through a systematic search of indexed articles in PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane, Web of Science, and Scopus, published between December 2019 to August 2021. Effect estimates from individual studies for association between markers of myocardial injury (Troponin), myocardial stretch (N-terminal-pro hormone BNP, NT-proBNP), and coagulopathy (D-Dimer) and death or severe/critical COVID-19 were pooled using inverse variance weighted random-effects model. Odds Ratios (OR), Hazard Ratios (HR), and 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) were pooled separately and reported by outcomes of critical/severe COVID-19 and death. A meta-analysis of proportions was also performed to summarize the pooled prevalence of co-morbidities in patients hospitalized with COVID-19. Results: We included 62 articles, with a total of 41,013 patients. The pooled proportion of patients with history of hypertension was 39% (95% CI: 34-44%); diabetes, 21% (95% CI: 18%-24%); coronary artery disease, 13% (95% CI: 10-16%); chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 7% (95% CI: 5-8%); and history of cancer, 5% (95% CI: 4-7%). Elevated troponin was associated with higher pooled odds of critical/severe COVID-19 and death [Odds Ratio (OR: 1.76, 95% CI: 1.42-2.16)]; and also separately for death (OR: 1.72, 95% CI: 1.32-2.25), and critical/severe COVID-1919 (OR: 1.93, 95% CI: 1.45-2.40). Elevations in NT-proBNP were also associated with higher severe COVID-19 and death (OR: 3.00, 95% CI: 1.58-5.70). Increases in D-dimer levels was also significantly associated with critical/severe COVID-19 and death (pooled OR: 1.38, 95% CI: 1.07-1.79). Conclusions: This meta-analysis synthesizes existing evidence showing that myocardial injury, and coagulopathy are complications of COVID-19. The durability of these complications and their contributions to long-term cardiac implications of the disease is still being investigated. Patients who have recovered from COVID-19 may benefit from minimally invasive assessment for markers of myocardial injury, stretch and coagulopathy for early risk stratification purposes.

6.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-295640

ABSTRACT

Background: Infection with SARS-CoV-2 virus can lead to myocardial injury, with cardiac biomarker elevations. <br><br>Objective: To quantify association between biomarkers of myocardial injury, coagulation, and severe COVID-19 and death in hospitalized patients. <br><br>Methods: Studies were identified from electronic databases, published between December 2019 to August 2021. Effect estimates for association between markers of myocardial injury (Troponin), myocardial stretch (N-terminal-pro hormone BNP, NT-proBNP), and coagulopathy (D-Dimer) and death or severe/critical COVID-19 were pooled using random-effects models. Odds Ratios (OR), Hazard Ratios (HR), were pooled separately and reported by outcomes of critical/severe COVID-19 and death. A meta-analysis of proportions summarized pooled prevalence of co-morbidities. <br><br>Results: We included 62 articles, with a total of 41,013 patients. The pooled proportion of patients with history of hypertension was 39% (95% CI: 34-44%);diabetes, 21% (95% CI: 18%-24%);coronary artery disease, 13% (95% CI: 10-16%);chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 7% (95% CI: 5-8%), and history of cancer, 5% (95% CI: 4-7%). Elevated troponin was associated with higher pooled odds of critical/severe COVID-19 and death [Odds Ratio (OR: 1.76, 95% CI: 1.42-2.16)];and also separately for death (OR: 1.72, 95% CI: 1.32-2.25), and critical/severe COVID-1919 (OR: 1.93, 95% CI: 1.45-2.40). Elevations in NT-proBNP were also associated with higher severe COVID-19 and death (OR: 3.00, 95% CI: 1.58-5.70). <br><br>Conclusions : This meta-analysis synthesizes evidence showing that myocardial injury, and coagulopathy are complications of COVID-19. Patients who have recovered from COVID-19 may benefit from minimally invasive assessment for markers of myocardial injury, stretch and coagulopathy for early risk stratification.<br><br>Funding: There was no funding for the study.<br><br>Declaration of Interests: The authors report no relationships that could be construed as a conflict of interest.

7.
J Clin Transl Sci ; 5(1): e152, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1324373

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had substantial global morbidity and mortality. Clinical research related to prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of COVID-19 is a top priority. Effective and efficient recruitment is challenging even without added constraints of a global pandemic. Recruitment registries offer a potential solution to slow or difficult recruitment. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this paper is to describe the design and implementation of a digital research recruitment registry to optimize awareness and participant enrollment for COVID-19-related research in Baltimore and to report preliminary results. METHODS: Planning began in March 2020, and the registry launched in July 2020. The primary recruitment mechanisms include electronic medical record data, postcards distributed at testing sites, and digital advertising campaigns. Following consent in a Research Electronic Data Capture survey, participants answer questions related to COVID-19 exposure, testing, and willingness to participate in research. Branching logic presents participants with studies they might be eligible for. RESULTS: As of March 24, 2021, 9010 participants have enrolled, and 64.2% are female, 80.6% are White, 9.4% are Black or African American, and 6% are Hispanic or Latino. Phone outreach has had the highest response rate (13.1%), followed by email (11.9%), text (11.4%), and patient portal message (9.4%). Eleven study teams have utilized the registry, and 4596 matches have been made between study teams and interested volunteers. CONCLUSION: Effective and efficient recruitment strategies are more important now than ever due to the time-limited nature of COVID-19 research. Pilot efforts have been successful in connecting interested participants with recruiting study teams.

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