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2.
JAAD international ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1615244
4.
JAAD Int ; 5: 85-95, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454275

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Occupational dermatoses caused by personal protective equipment (PPE) in the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic are emerging occupational health challenges that must be promptly and effectively addressed to ease burden on our health care workers. OBJECTIVE: A systematic review was conducted to determine common PPE-related dermatoses, affected body sites, and implicated occupational contactants. We further proposed solutions to mitigate this problem. METHODS: Online databases were searched for articles on PPE-related dermatoses in health care workers during the COVID-19 pandemic written in English and published from January 1, 2020, to January 30, 2021. RESULTS: Sixteen studies, including a total of 3958 participants, were included. The most common dermatoses were xerosis, pressure-related erythema, and contact dermatitis, mainly affecting the face and hands. The most widely implicated contactants were increased frequency of hand hygiene, gloves, N95 masks, and goggles. Proposed solutions were categorized as individual self-care, protection of the workforce, and long-term preventive measures. CONCLUSION: Through measures such as regular basic skin care education, early access to specialty clinics via telemedicine, and designing of better-fit PPE, the challenges posed by PPE-related occupational dermatoses can be significantly reduced.

5.
Dermatol Clin ; 39(4): 639-651, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1437429

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) brought the world to its knees. As each nation grappled with launching an effective response while simultaneously minimizing repercussions on health care systems, economies, and societies, the medical and scientific landscape shifted forever. In particular, COVID-19 has challenged and transformed the field of dermatology and the way we practice. In this article, dermatologists from 11 countries share insights gained from local experience. These global perspectives will help provide a better framework for delivering quality dermatologic care and understanding how the field has evolved during this medical crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Decision-Making/methods , Dermatology/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Skin Diseases/therapy , Academic Medical Centers , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Interdisciplinary Communication
6.
JAAD Int ; 5: 54-64, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1336631

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Teledermatology (TD) has emerged as a critical way of delivering care remotely in the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: We conducted a systematic review to assess how TD has been implemented worldwide. METHODS: We searched PubMed, Scopus, Embase, Web of Science, and Google Scholar for articles on the use of TD for patient care, written in English and published from December 1, 2019, to October 15, 2020. RESULTS: Twenty-seven studies were included, involving 16,981 patients. There was significant uptake of TD during the pandemic. Synchronous TD appeared to be more commonly implemented than asynchronous TD. Common ambulatory dermatoses such as acne or eczema were reported to be more amenable to TD assessment and management. TD also appeared to be useful for the diagnosis of cutaneous involvement of COVID-19 infection and follow-up of stable oncodermatology cases. LIMITATIONS: A pooled analysis of all relevant outcomes was not always possible due to the heterogeneity in the methodologies of included studies. CONCLUSION: TD is a useful and convenient tool for the management of common ambulatory dermatoses in the COVID-19 pandemic.

7.
JAAD Int ; 2: 119-133, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-978331

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Because of the increasing emergence of skin manifestations of COVID-19 worldwide, we investigated the published reports of these lesions. METHODS: We conducted a literature search for original and review articles published from November 11, 2019 to September 30, 2020. RESULTS: We identified 5 skin lesions common in patients with COVID-19: pseudo-chilblains, rashes containing macules and papules, and urticarial, vesicular, and vaso-occlusive lesions. These lesions manifested at various times in relation to the COVID-19 symptoms, which may indicate whether the lesions are virus-induced or are delayed immunological responses to the infection. Skin lesions were more prevalent among Europeans and United States residents than among Asians, as was pseudo-chilblain, and the morphology of the skin lesions varied among continents. Pseudo-chilblains were the most common COVID-19 skin manifestation in Europe and the United States, but there was only 1 reported case from Asian populations. Additionally, patients with vaso-occlusive lesions were more likely than those with pseudo-chilblains to be admitted to the intensive care unit and to die. CONCLUSION: Different cutaneous manifestations in patients with COVID-19 could reflect a wide spectrum of viral interactions with the skin, though reporting bias may play a role as well.

8.
Ann Acad Med Singap ; 49(9): 674-676, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-973006

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continues to spread globally at a staggering speed. At present, there is no effective treatment or vaccine for COVID-19. Hand disinfection is a cost-effective way to prevent its transmission. According to the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines, we should wash our hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, alcohol-based hand rubs (ABHRs) with at least 60% alcohol are the alternative. With diligent hand disinfection reinforced during COVID-19, there is an increased prevalence of contact dermatitis. This commentary highlights the fact that contact dermatitis is a readily treatable condition and should not cause any deviation of proper hand hygiene. In irritant contact dermatitis (ICD), the management strategies are selection of less irritating hand hygiene products, frequent use of moisturisers to rebuild the skin barrier, and education on proper hand hygiene practices. In allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), the identification and avoidance of the contact allergen is the key to treatment. However, ACD is less common and only accounts for 20% of the cases. The identified allergens in hand cleansers are predominantly preservative excipients and ACD attributable to ABHR are very uncommon. Alcohol-free hand rubs are widely available on the market but it is not a recommended alternative to ABHRs by the CDC.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Dermatitis, Allergic Contact/therapy , Dermatitis, Irritant/therapy , Emollients/therapeutic use , Hand Dermatoses/therapy , Hand Disinfection/methods , Hygroscopic Agents/therapeutic use , 1-Propanol/adverse effects , 2-Propanol/adverse effects , Anti-Infective Agents, Local/adverse effects , Dermatitis, Allergic Contact/etiology , Dermatitis, Irritant/etiology , Dermatitis, Occupational/etiology , Dermatitis, Occupational/therapy , Detergents/adverse effects , Ethanol/adverse effects , Hand Dermatoses/etiology , Hand Hygiene , Hand Sanitizers/adverse effects , Health Personnel , Humans
9.
Annals Academy of Medicine Singapore ; 49(9):674-676, 2020.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-916725

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continues to spread globally at a staggering speed. At present, there is no effective treatment or vaccine for COVID-19. Hand disinfection is a cost-effective way to prevent its transmission. According to the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines, we should wash our hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, alcohol-based hand rubs (ABHRs) with at least 60% alcohol are the alternative. With diligent hand disinfection reinforced during COVID-19, there is an increased prevalence of contact dermatitis. This commentary highlights the fact that contact dermatitis is a readily treatable condition and should not cause any deviation of proper hand hygiene. In irritant contact dermatitis (ICD), the management strategies are selection of less irritating hand hygiene products, frequent use of moisturisers to rebuild the skin barrier, and education on proper hand hygiene practices. In allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), the identification and avoidance of the contact allergen is the key to treatment. However, ACD is less common and only accounts for 20% of the cases. The identified allergens in hand cleansers are predominantly preservative excipients and ACD attributable to ABHR are very uncommon. Alcohol-free hand rubs are widely available on the market but it is not a recommended alternative to ABHRs by the CDC.

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