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1.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-332245

ABSTRACT

Objective We examined the association between presenteeism and risk of job resignations and unemployment among Japanese workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods A prospective study of 27,036 Internet monitors was conducted, starting in December 2020, with 18,560 (68.7%) participating in the follow-up by December 2021. The Work Functioning Impairment Scale (WFun) was used to measure the degree of work function impairment. Results The group with the highest WFun scores had higher odds ratios (ORs) for both retirement and unemployment for health reasons than the group with the lowest WFun scores. ORs were 2.97 (95%CI: 2.46-3.59, p<0. 001) and 1.80 (95%CI: 1.64-1.98, p<0.001), respectively. Conclusions Workers with work functioning impairment were at increased risk of resignation or unemployment. Management strategies for workers with work functioning impairment are needed to reduce their disadvantages in employment.

2.
J Occup Environ Med ; 64(3): e109-e113, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1730746

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the association between attending work while experiencing fever or cold symptoms and workers' socioeconomic background and company characteristics during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey was performed. Of a total of 33,302 participants, 3676 workers who experienced fever or cold symptoms after April 2020 were included. The odds ratios (ORs) of attending work while sick associated with workers' socioeconomic background and company characteristics were evaluated using a multilevel logistic model. RESULTS: The OR of attending work while sick associated with a lack of policy prohibiting workers from working when ill was 2.75 (95% CI: 2.28 to 3.20, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: This study suggests that clear company policies on work and illness can be effective for preventing employees from attending work while sick.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Class
3.
EuropePMC;
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-327657

ABSTRACT

Background: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, non-married people are at high risk of loneliness. With social interactions restricted, it is important for non-married people to acquire a new romantic partner for their mental health and quality of life. We hypothesized that infection control efforts in the workplace influence people's social interactions, including romantic activities. Methods: We conducted an internet-based prospective cohort study from December 2020 (baseline) to December 2021, using self-administered questionnaires. Briefly, 27,036 workers completed the questionnaires at baseline, and when followed up after one year, 18,560 (68.7%) participated. A total of 6,486 non-married individuals with no romantic relationship at baseline were included in the analysis. At baseline they were asked about the implementation of infection control measures in the workplace, and at follow-up they were asked about activities they performed with a view to romantic relationships during the period from baseline to follow-up. Results: Compared to workers in workplaces with no infection control measures, the OR associated with romance-related activities for those in workplaces with seven or more infection control measures was 1.90 (95% CI: 1.45-2.48, p<0.001), and the OR associated with having a new romantic partner was 1.79 (95% CI: 1.20-2.66, p=0.004). Conclusions: Under the COVID-19 pandemic, the implementation of infection control measures in the workplace and the expressed satisfaction with those measures promoted romantic relationships among non-married, single individuals.

4.
J Occup Health ; 64(1): e12313, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1626927

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study examined the relationship between interruption to routine medical care during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic and sickness presenteeism among workers in Japan. METHODS: A cross-sectional study using data obtained from an internet monitor questionnaire was conducted. Interruption to medical care was defined based on the response "I have not been able to go to the hospital or receive treatment as scheduled." The fraction of sickness presenteeism days in the past 30 days was employed as the primary outcome. A fractional logit model was used for analysis to treat bounded data. RESULTS: Of the 27 036 participants, 17 526 (65%) were workers who did not require routine medical care, 8451 (31%) were using medical care as scheduled, and 1059 (4%) experienced interrupted medical care. The adjusted odds ratio (aOR) of sickness presenteeism was significantly higher among workers who experienced interrupted medical care (3.44; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.04-3.89) than those who did not require routine medical care. In terms of symptoms, the highest aOR was observed among workers with mental health symptoms (aOR: 5.59, 95% CI: 5.04-6.20). CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests the importance of continuing necessary treatment during a pandemic to prevent presenteeism.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Presenteeism , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
BMJ Open ; 11(12): e050068, 2021 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583113

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused medical care delays and avoidance around the globe. However, little is known about the relationship between disrupted care and productivity loss attributed to presenteeism during the COVID-19 pandemic. We aimed to investigate whether disrupted care during the COVID-19 state of emergency was associated with health status and productivity loss. METHODS: We used data from a nationwide, cross-sectional, Internet-based, self-administered survey. We performed multiple logistic regression analysis on data from 14 545 participants to investigate the associations among variables related to disrupted care, health status and the Work Functioning Impairment Scale, with a cut-off of 21 points. RESULTS: Participants who experienced exacerbation of underlying disease (adjusted OR (aOR) 2.84; 95% CI 2.28 to 3.53) or any type of disrupted care were more likely to show low productivity at work. Experiencing disruptions in routine and non-routine clinical settings (aOR 4.64; 95% CI 3.64 to 5.92 and aOR 6.29; 95% CI 4.74 to 8.34, respectively), and running out of drugs (aOR 6.13; 95% CI 4.60 to 8.18) were strongly associated with exacerbation of underlying disease. CONCLUSIONS: Workers who experienced disrupted care were much more likely to show productivity loss. Exacerbation of underlying disease is one possible pathway through which disrupted care could affect productivity loss attributed to presenteeism. Our study provides evidence of the importance of early diagnosis and continuous treatment of non-COVID-19 patients to enable them to remain healthy and continue to work during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Presenteeism , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Occup Environ Med ; 64(3): e109-e113, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566094

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the association between attending work while experiencing fever or cold symptoms and workers' socioeconomic background and company characteristics during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey was performed. Of a total of 33,302 participants, 3676 workers who experienced fever or cold symptoms after April 2020 were included. The odds ratios (ORs) of attending work while sick associated with workers' socioeconomic background and company characteristics were evaluated using a multilevel logistic model. RESULTS: The OR of attending work while sick associated with a lack of policy prohibiting workers from working when ill was 2.75 (95% CI: 2.28 to 3.20, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: This study suggests that clear company policies on work and illness can be effective for preventing employees from attending work while sick.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Class
7.
2021.
Preprint in English | Other preprints | ID: ppcovidwho-295643

ABSTRACT

Objective This study examined the relationship between interruption to routine medical care during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic and sickness presenteeism in Japan. Methods An internet monitor questionnaire was conducted. Data from 27,036 people were analyzed. Interruption to medical care was defined based on the response “I have not been able to go to the hospital or receive treatment as scheduled.” The number of sickness presenteeism days in the past 30 days was employed as the primary outcome. A zero-inflated negative binomial model was used for analysis. Results The incidence rate ratio was significantly higher among workers who experienced interrupted medical care (2.26;95% confidence interval: 2.03–2.52) than those who did not require routine medical care. Conclusions This study suggests the importance of continuing necessary treatment during a pandemic to prevent presenteeism.

8.
J Occup Environ Med ; 63(9): e565-e570, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486445

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between the physical work environment and work function while working from home (WFH). METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted. Data from 5760 workers who worked from home at least 1 day a month were analyzed. The physical work environment while WFH was used as an exposure factor. The presence of work functioning impairment was measured using Work Functioning impairment Scale (WFun). Mixed-effects logistic regression was used with the prefecture of residence as a random effect. RESULTS: Work functioning impairment was significantly associated with a "No" response to recommended environments. The highest odds ratio (OR) of work functioning impairment was associated with a "No" response to "There is enough light to do my work" (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.02, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.73 to 2.35, P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Improving work environments may prevent negative health effects and improve productivity while WFH.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Ind Health ; 2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468299

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to evaluate the association between work-related changes caused by COVID-19 and psychological distress among Japanese workers. The study was conducted from August 25 to September 30, 2020. The participants were 15,454 employees who were registered as panelists with an online survey company. The Kessler psychological distress scale with a 13-point cutoff was used to measure psychological distress. Multiple logistic regression was performed. Of the respondents, 8.9% were evaluated as having severe psychological distress. Among five examined work-related changes, being laid off and changing jobs (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 5.43; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.18-7.05), experiencing temporary workplace closure (aOR = 1.94; 95% CI: 1.67-2.25), being forced to visit the workplace for paperwork (aOR = 1.84; 95% CI: 1.58-2.15), and starting telework from home (aOR = 1.18; 95% CI: 1.01-1.37) were associated with increased psychological distress; no significant association was found for participation in work-related online meetings. The impact on psychological distress was greater among men, especially for being laid off and changing jobs because of COVID-19. It is important to assess and reduce negative mental health effects among workers experiencing work-related changes caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, taking gender differences into account.

10.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 17(11): 3975-3981, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1294650

ABSTRACT

Many factors are related to vaccination intentions. However, gender differences in the determinants of intention to get the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine have not been fully investigated. This study examined gender differences in the determinants of willingness to get the COVID-19 vaccine among the working-age population in Japan. We conducted a cross-sectional study of Japanese citizens aged 20-65 years using an online self-administered questionnaire in December 2020. Logistic regression analysis was performed. Among 27,036 participants (13,814 men and 13,222 women), the percentage who were willing to get the COVID-19 vaccine was lower among women than among men (33.0% vs. 41.8%). Age and education level showed a gender gap regarding the association with willingness to get the COVID-19 vaccine: men who were older or had a higher level of education were more willing to get the vaccine, whereas women aged 30-49 years and those with a higher level of education showed a relatively low willingness to get the vaccine. For both men and women, marriage, higher annual household income, underlying disease, current smoking, vaccination for influenza during the current season, and fear of COVID-19 transmission were linked to a higher likelihood of being willing to get the COVID-19 vaccine. These findings give important insight into identifying target groups in need of intervention regarding COVID-19 vaccination, especially among women. Providing education about COVID-19 and influenza vaccination in the workplace may be an effective strategy to increase COVID-19 vaccine uptake.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Japan , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Vaccination
11.
J Occup Environ Med ; 63(9): e565-e570, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1254908

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between the physical work environment and work function while working from home (WFH). METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted. Data from 5760 workers who worked from home at least 1 day a month were analyzed. The physical work environment while WFH was used as an exposure factor. The presence of work functioning impairment was measured using Work Functioning impairment Scale (WFun). Mixed-effects logistic regression was used with the prefecture of residence as a random effect. RESULTS: Work functioning impairment was significantly associated with a "No" response to recommended environments. The highest odds ratio (OR) of work functioning impairment was associated with a "No" response to "There is enough light to do my work" (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.02, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.73 to 2.35, P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Improving work environments may prevent negative health effects and improve productivity while WFH.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
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