Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 11 de 11
Filter
1.
Reprod Health ; 18(1): 166, 2021 Aug 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770551

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nigeria, like many other countries, has been severely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. While efforts have been devoted to curtailing the disease, a major concern has been its potential effects on the delivery and utilization of reproductive health care services in the country. The objective of the study was to investigate the extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic and related lockdowns had affected the provision of essential reproductive, maternal, child, and adolescent health (RMCAH) services in primary health care facilities across the Nigerian States. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of 307 primary health centres (PHCs) in 30 Local Government Areas in 10 States, representing the six geopolitical regions of the country. A semi-structured interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to obtain data on issues relating to access and provision of RMCAH services before, during and after COVID-19 lockdowns from the head nurses/midwives in the facilities. The questionnaire was entered into Open Data Kit mounted on smartphones. Data were analysed using frequency and percentage, summary statistics, and Kruskal-Wallis test. RESULTS: Between 76 and 97% of the PHCS offered RMCAH services before the lockdown. Except in antenatal, delivery and adolescent care, there was a decline of between 2 and 6% in all the services during the lockdown and up to 10% decline after the lockdown with variation across and within States. During the lockdown. Full-service delivery was reported by 75.2% whereas 24.8% delivered partial services. There was a significant reduction in clients' utilization of the services during the lockdown, and the difference between States before the pandemic, during, and after the lockdown. Reported difficulties during the lockdown included stock-out of drugs (25.7%), stock-out of contraceptives (25.1%), harassment by the law enforcement agents (76.9%), and transportation difficulties (55.8%). Only 2% of the PHCs reported the availability of gowns, 18% had gloves, 90.1% had hand sanitizers, and a temperature checker was available in 94.1%. Slightly above 10% identified clients with symptoms of COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: The large proportion of PHCs who provided RMCAH services despite the lockdown demonstrates resilience. Considering the several difficulties reported, and the limited provision of primary protective equipment more effort by the government and non-governmental agencies is recommended to strengthen delivery of sexual and reproductive health in primary health centres in Nigeria during the pandemic.


The onset of COVID-19 has raised concerns that it may compromise women's access to sexual and reproductive health and rights. Although data are still emerging, some reports indicate reduced access to sexual and reproductive health services, largely due to disruptions in the demand and supply of contraceptive commodities, the diversion of staff and resources to other clinical services, and clinic closures. While these concerns have similarly been broached for Nigeria, there has been no systematic documentation of the extent of the disruptions of reproductive health services caused by COVID-19 and its effects on the provision and utilization of related services in the country This study was a cross-sectional facility-based survey conducted in 10 states, 30 Local Government Areas and 302 primary health centres in Nigeria. The objective of the study was to explore through key informant interviews with service providers in the health centres, the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on demand and supply of sexual and reproductive health services. Field assistants administered a semi-structured interview guide to the heads of the health centres that elicited information on availability and use of the health centres before, during and after the lock-downs associated with the pandemic. The results indicate that a large proportion of the health centres opened for the provision of essential sexual and reproductive health services during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown. However, fewer clients used the services due to difficulties in travel because of the lockdowns, stock-outs in the health centres, and the fear that they may contract the virus if they leave their houses to the health centres. Although the health centres reported some cases of COVID-19, there was limited provision for personal protective equipment to motivate the health workers to optimize services for clients. From this study, we conclude that efforts should be made to identify innovations for addressing these challenges to enable the continued provision of sexual and reproductive health services by health centres despite the COVID-19 pandemic in Nigeria's health centres.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Reproductive Health Services , Adolescent , Ambulatory Care Facilities , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Facilities , Humans , Nigeria/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
3.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-318284

ABSTRACT

Background: Nigeria has experienced COVID-19 pandemic as in nearly 200 countries around the world. The objective of this study was to investigate the knowledge, risk perceptions, and preventive practices among rural women in Edo State, Nigeria to identify the social circumstances under which women respond to COVID-19 in the community. Method: The study design was cross-sectional and consisted of face-to-face interviews with 1,411 women in 20 rural communities in Edo state, south-south Nigeria using a structured questionnaire. Questions consisted of socio-demographic characteristics, the knowledge of COVID-19, its symptoms and prevention method, and the women’s compliance with the prevention guidelines recommended by the Nigerian Centre for Disease Control. Some of the questions and formats were adapted from the survey tool and guidance for monitoring knowledge, risk perceptions and preventive behavior by the WHO Regional Office for Europe. The data were analyzed with univariate, bivariate and multivariable statistical techniques. Results: The results showed relatively high knowledge of COVID-19 but low perceptions of risk, and inadequate self-reported compliance with the recommendations for prevention, use of face mask, and handwashing. The most prominent determinants of lack of knowledge of COVID-19, the symptoms, and preventive measures;perception of COVID-19 as no health threat;and poor preventive behavior include less exposure to the media, being in a polygynous and consensual marriage, illiterate, age, and not having a mobile phone. Conclusions: We conclude that although rural women in Nigeria have relatively high knowledge, low-risk perception and adoption of preventive measures for COVID-19 are grossly inadequate. These deficits are attributable to illiteracy, poor access to information, and the pervading poverty in rural communities. Appropriate policies and programs that address these challenges will prevent COVID-19 pandemic and its consequences in rural Nigeria.

4.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-304808

ABSTRACT

Background: Nigeria, like many other countries, has been severely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. While efforts have been devoted to curtailing the disease, a major concern has been its potential effects on the delivery and utilization of reproductive health care services in the country. The objective of the study was to investigate the extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic and related lockdowns had affected the provision of essential reproductive health, maternal and child health, and adolescent health services in primary health care facilities across the Nigerian States.MethodsThis was a cross-sectional study of 307 primary health facilities in 30 Local Government Areas in 10 States, representing the six geopolitical regions of the country. A semi-structured interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to obtain data on issues relating to access and service provision before, during and after COVID-19 lockdowns from the head nurses/midwives in the facilities. The questionnaire was entered into Open Data Kit mounted on smartphones. Data were analysed using non-parametric statistics.ResultsThe results show that a large proportion of the primary health facilities in the selected states opened for the provision of essential sexual and reproductive health and rights services during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown. However, there was a significant reduction in clients’ utilization of services due to challenges experienced in service implementation such as stock-outs, and low demand for services by clients. Although the health facilities reported identifying cases of COVID-19, there was limited provision for primary protective equipment and other special offers that would motivate the health workers to optimize services for clients. ConclusionsWe conclude that efforts made to address these challenges by governments, non-governmental agencies, the private sector, and donor agencies working in low resource settings would reduce the health and social burden posed by COVID-19 in Nigeria.

5.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-309966

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 mortality rate has not been formally assessed in Nigeria. We therefore aimed to address this gap and identify associated mortality risk factors during the first and second waves in Nigeria.Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the national surveillance database between February 27, 2020, and April 3, 2021. The outcome was deaths amongst persons with a laboratory diagnosis of COVID-19. Incidence rates of COVID-19 death per 100,000 person-days were estimated. Adjusted negative binomial regression was used to identify factors associated with COVID-19 death, and presented as adjusted Incidence Rate Ratios (aIRR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: The first wave included 65,790 COVID-19 patients, of whom 994 (1∙51%) died;the second wave included 91,089 patients, of whom 513 (0∙56%) died. The incidence rate of deaths related to COVID-19 was higher in the first wave [54∙25 (95% CI: 50∙98-57∙73)] than in the second wave [19∙19 (17∙60-20∙93)]. Factors independently associated with increased risk of death in both waves were: age ≥45 years, male gender [first wave aIRR 1∙65 (1∙35-2∙02) and second wave 1∙52 (1∙11-2∙06)], being symptomatic [aIRR 3∙17 (2∙59-3∙89) and 3∙04 (2∙20-4∙21)], and being hospitalised [aIRR 4∙19 (3∙26-5∙39) and 7∙84 (4∙90-12∙54)].Interpretation: The incidence rate of COVID-19 death in Nigeria was higher in the first wave, suggesting improved public health response and care during the second wave. Regional mortality differences suggest that policy makers focus on regional equity in access to testing and quality of care to mitigate the impact of another COVID-19 wave in Nigeria.Funding: None to declare. Declaration of Interest: None to declare. Ethical Approval: Ethical approval for the study was given by the Nigeria National Health Research Ethics Committee (NHREC/01/01/2007-22/06/2020).

7.
African Journal of Reproductive Health ; 25(4):11-16, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1503083

ABSTRACT

Multi-dimensional interventions that incorporate psychological, sociological, public health, and human rights approaches are needed to target behavior change in male intimate partners. [...]if the world must witness a substantial decline in gender-based violence, the lens must be turned to what happens in the private sphere of intimate heterosexual unions where a large proportion of violence against women takes place. Shamu S, Abrahams N, Temmerman M, Musekiwa A and Zarowsky C. A systematic review of African studies on intimate partner violence against pregnant women: prevalence and risk factors. Brathwaite R, Addo J, Smeeth L, Lock K. A systematic review of tobacco smoking prevalence and description of tobacco control strategies in Sub-Saharan African countries;2007 to 2014.

9.
Afr J Reprod Health ; 24(s1): 41-45, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-903312

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in December 2019 and its spread to 216 countries within the first eight months has created a huge strain on health systems across the world. Health care workers (HCWs) at the fore-front of combating the pandemic are largely at risk of infection with the number of infected HCWs increasing daily in many countries. Prior to the outbreak of COVID-19, focus of laws and policies have largely been on the responsibilities of HCWs with little or no attention paid to their rights and protection. The increased rate of infection among health workers and the inadequate conditions under which HCWs have carried out their life- saving responsibilities during the pandemic has created the need to change the narrative by focusing on policy formulation and implementation to ensure that HCWs rights are protected. We endorse the widespread use of the WHO recommendations on Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) Outbreak: Rights, Roles and Responsibilities of Health workers, including key considerations for occupational safety and health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/standards , Human Rights , Social Responsibility , Health Personnel/ethics , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Nigeria , Pandemics , Professional Role , SARS-CoV-2 , World Health Organization
10.
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL