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1.
The American Journal of the Medical Sciences ; 365:S269-S270, 2023.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2211716
2.
Physical Review Physics Education Research ; 18(2), 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2123144

ABSTRACT

Laboratory courses are an important part of the undergraduate physics curriculum. During physics labs, students can engage in authentic, hands-on experimental practices, which can prepare them for graduate school, research laboratories, and jobs in industry. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic in Spring 2020, colleges and universities across the world rapidly transitioned to teaching labs remotely. In this work, we report results from a survey of physics lab instructors on how they adapted their courses in the transition to emergency remote teaching. We identified three common themes in the instructors' responses: (i) using a variety of simulation tools, (ii) changing learning goals of the courses to be more concept focused, and (iii) reducing group work due to equity and technological concerns. We discuss the common challenges and successes reported by instructors, which leads to themes and lessons that can impact future remote and in -person instruction.

3.
European Urology ; 79:S259, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1747436

ABSTRACT

Introduction & Objectives: Representatives from 9 global cancer coalitions/alliances, including international networks of kidney and bladder cancer patient organisations, totaling over 750 cancer patient groups and the interests of over 14 million patients have come together during the pandemic to review and evaluate the patient-perspective impact. Cancer services have faced challenges as a result of COVID-19, including suspension of screening and diagnostic services;delays in diagnosis leading to higher mortality rates;cancellation/deferral of life-saving treatments;changes in treatment regimens and suspension of vital research. For organisations that provide support to cancer patients, declining income, the need to reduce staff and move to virtual working practices has put extra strain on them, while demand for support due to the pandemic has increased. Materials & Methods: 5 coalitions surveyed their member organisations. A number of coalitions consulted their members by individual surveys or consultations. Results: A survey of 157 organisations from 56 countries found that 57% experienced an average increase of 44% in patient calls and emails. 45% reported that their future viability may be under threat because of the impact of COVID-19 on income. Examples of good practice were reported where healthcare systems have acted to protect patients and cancer services. These include the introduction of COVID-free centres, separation of cancer patients from those who may have COVID-19, and the introduction of virtual and telemedicine services. Organisations have also introduced new ways of working including virtual psychological support services and app-based support groups. These best practices should form part of a global plan of action for future health crisis. Conclusions: Collaboration between patient advocacy organisations, governments and health services is needed to ensure the ground lost to the COVID-19 pandemic is regained. Action is required to restore cancer services safely and effectively without delay. Additional resources for organisations that support cancer patients are required to ensure that they continue to provide vital services. Finally, a global plan of action for cancer is required to meet the challenges of any future health crisis.

4.
5.
Journal of Investigative Medicine ; 70(2):651-652, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1709232

ABSTRACT

Purpose of Study As COVID-19 cases rose in spring of 2020, schools faced the unprecedented challenge of providing safe and effective education during a global pandemic. With most institutions transitioning to remote instruction, teachers, students, and parents had to cope with changes that came with online distance learning (ODL). Children with learning or behavioral disabilities, such as ADHD, may have faced setbacks. The aim of the study was to examine parents' observations of their children with ADHD transitioning from in-person classroom instruction to ODL in regards to their academic performance and ADHD symptoms during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods Used The study utilized a cross-sectional design and recruited patients from a pediatric clinic in Houston, TX. Participants included parents of school-age children with an ADHD diagnosis. Parents were emailed a novel survey that utilized questions from the Vanderbilt Assessment Scale via Qualtrics in February 2021, and again in May 2021. Responses were anonymously collected until August 2021. Children using ODL during some or all of fall 2020 were included in the study. Parents reported semester grades for fall 2019 and fall 2020, and Vanderbilt Survey responses from the same time frame. Grades were measured on a 0-100 sliding scale, and behavioral responses were weighted (1-symptom decreased, 2-symptom did not change, 3-symptom increased). The study was IRB-approved. Summary of Results Eighty-one parents of children in grades 1-12 with ADHD were identified and contacted to take part in the survey via email. Sixty of these parents received followup phone calls. Twenty-four started surveys. Twenty-one parent-child dyads met the study criteria, completed surveys, and were enrolled in the study. Semester averages in math, science, language arts/reading, and social studies appeared to all decrease from fall 2019 to fall 2020 (-3.5,-5.3,-2.8,-1.6), with the most prominent decrease in science (p=0.08). Overall, ADHD symptoms varied from fall 2019 to fall 2020. Parents reported increases in the following: lack of follow through with directions and failure to finish activities(62%), forgetfulness in daily activities(57%), and lack of attention to detail and making careless mistakes(57%). Most parents reported no change in relationships. Two-thirds of parents reported that their child did not benefit at all from ODL;however, 10% of parents said their child benefitted from less distraction, and 10% said their child preferred computer-based learning. Parents reported the following challenges with ODL: staying focused/organized and boredom(43%), lack of 1-on-1 instruction and ability to ask questions(33%), and social isolation( 14%). Conclusions During the COVID-19 pandemic, pediatric patients with ADHD seemed to perform worse academically in a virtual school setting compared to an in-person classroom. In this same population and time frame, ADHD behavioral symptoms appeared to either increase, especially those that were task-oriented, or remain unchanged.

6.
Breast ; 59:S38-S39, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1597378

ABSTRACT

Background: The Global Cancer Coalitions Network (GCCN), established in May 2020, collectively represents over 750 cancer patient organisations representing over 14 million patients around the world. Cancer services have faced challenges as a result of COVID-19, including suspension of screening and diagnostic services;delays in diagnosis leading to higher mortality rates;cancellation/deferral of life-saving treatments;changes in treatment regimens and suspension of vital research. Substantial increases in the number of avoidable cancer deaths are to be expected as a result of diagnostic delays due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: 6 global cancer coalitions surveyed their member organisations in December 2020. Results: Among 104 organisations from 46 countries representing advanced breast, bladder, colorectal, lymphoma, ovarian, and pancreatic cancer patient groups: • Demand for services has increased • 2/3 organisations experienced a fall in income from December 2020, averaging -48% • Over 1 in 10 organisations have closed temporarily, and some permanently • Only 1 in 10 organisations believe their 2021 income will return to levels seen before the pandemic • Almost half report that their ability to operate is under threat • Half do not have access to any national funding schemes to ensure operation during the pandemic • Staff shrunk -20%;volunteer numbers -70% • 20% organisations report normalised cancer services in December 2020;more respondents report services are “worse than ever” • Patient distress, isolation and financial hardship have increased markedly Conclusions: For organisations providing support to cancer patients, declining income, the need to reduce staff and move to virtual working practices has added strain while demand for support due to the pandemic has increased. Emergency support, including funding, must be made available to these organisations to ensure that the needs of cancer patients worldwide continue to be met.

7.
medrxiv; 2022.
Preprint in English | medRxiv | ID: ppzbmed-10.1101.2022.01.06.21268555

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to pose a threat to the general population. The ongoing vaccination programs provide protection to individuals and facilitate the opening of society and a return to normality. However, emergent and existing SARS-CoV-2 variants capable of evading the immune system endanger the efficacy of the vaccination strategy. To preserve the efficacy of SARS-CoV-2 vaccination globally, aggressive and effective surveillance for known and emerging SARS-CoV-2 Variants of Concern (VOC) is required. Rapid and specific molecular diagnostics can provide speed and coverage advantages compared to genomic sequencing alone, benefitting the public health response and facilitating VOC containment. In this work, we expand the recently developed SARS-CoV-2 CRISPR-Cas detection technology (SHERLOCK) to allow rapid and sensitive discrimination of VOCs, that can be used at point of care and/or implemented in the pipelines of small or large testing facilities, and even determine proportion of VOCs in pooled population-level wastewater samples. This technology aims to complement the ongoing sequencing efforts to allow facile and, crucially, rapid identification of individuals infected with VOCs to help break infection chains. Here, we show the optimisation of our VarLOCK assays (Variant-specific SHERLOCK) for multiple specific mutations in the S gene of SARS-CoV-2 and validation with samples from the Cardiff University Testing Service. We also show the applicability of VarLOCK to national wastewater surveillance of SARS-CoV-2 variants. In addition, we show the rapid adaptability of the technique for new and emerging VOCs such as Omicron.


Subject(s)
COVID-19
8.
Planta Medica ; 87(15):1297-1297, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1585690
10.
Australian Journal of Administrative Law ; 28(3):149-165, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1507460

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Australian Federal, State and Territory governments have outsourced the delivery of key public services, including hotel quarantine programs, to the private sector. Accountability should not be lost where private companies are contracted to perform public functions, especially when their actions directly impact Australia's response to the pandemic. This article focuses on the outsourcing of services in Victoria's hotel quarantine program over March to June 2020 and the reports from the COVID-19 Hotel Quarantine Inquiry. I use the Victorian program as a case study to highlight the existing accountability gap between the treatment of public and private actors under public law. This case study indicates public law accountability mechanisms are more likely to be available where decisions are made by a public agency. I also evaluate the benefits of extending private law accountability mechanisms to public authorities to remedy the accountability gap.

12.
Annals of Oncology ; 32:S1147, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1432894

ABSTRACT

Background: The Global Cancer Coalitions Network (GCCN), established in May 2020, collectively represents over 750 cancer patient organisations representing over 14 million patients around the world. Cancer services have faced challenges as a result of COVID-19, including suspension of screening and diagnostic services;delays in diagnosis leading to higher mortality rates;cancellation/deferral of life-saving treatments;changes in treatment regimens and suspension of vital research. Substantial increases in the number of avoidable cancer deaths are to be expected as a result of diagnostic delays due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: 6 global cancer coalitions surveyed their member organisations in December 2020. Results: Among 104 organisations from 46 countries representing advanced breast, bladder, colorectal, lymphoma, ovarian, and pancreatic cancer patient groups: · Demand for services has increased · 2/3 organisations experienced a fall in income from December 2020, averaging -48% · Over 1 in 10 organisations have closed temporarily, and some permanently · Only 1 in 10 organisations believe their 2021 income will return to levels seen before the pandemic · Almost half report that their ability to operate is under threat · Half do not have access to any national funding schemes to ensure operation during the pandemic · Staff shrunk -20%;volunteer numbers -70% · <20% organisations report normalised cancer services in December 2020;more respondents report services are “worse than ever” · Patient distress, isolation and financial hardship have increased markedly. Conclusions: For organisations providing support to cancer patients, declining income, the need to reduce staff and move to virtual working practices has added strain while demand for support due to the pandemic has increased. Emergency support, including funding, must be made available to these organisations to ensure that the needs of cancer patients worldwide continue to be met. Legal entity responsible for the study: The authors. Funding: Has not received any funding. Disclosure: All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

13.
European Urology ; 79:S259-S259, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1357858
14.
Journal of Clinical Oncology ; 39(15 SUPPL), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1339378

ABSTRACT

Background: Representatives from 8 global cancer coalitions/alliances, representing 650 cancer patient groups and the interests of over 14 million patients have come together during the pandemic to review and evaluate the patient-perspective impact. Cancer services have faced challenges as a result of COVID-19, including suspension of screening and diagnostic services;delays in diagnosis leading to higher mortality rates;cancellation/deferral of life-saving treatments;changes in treatment regimens and suspension of vital research. For organisations that provide support to cancer patients, declining income, the need to reduce staff and move to virtual working practices has put extra strain while demand for support due to the pandemic has increased. Methods: 5 coalitions surveyed their member organisations. A number of coalitions consulted their members by individual surveys or consultations. Results: A survey of 157 organisations representing advanced breast, bladder, lymphoma, ovarian and pancreatic cancer patient groups from 56 countries found that 57% experienced an average increase of 44% in patient calls and emails. 45% reported that their future viability may be under threat because of the impact of COVID-19 on income. Examples of good practice were reported where healthcare systems have acted to protect patients and cancer services. These include the introduction of COVID-free centres, separation of cancer patients from those who may have COVID-19, and the introduction of virtual and telemedicine services. Organisations have also introduced new ways of working including virtual psychological support services and appbased support groups. These best practices should form part of a global plan of action for future health crisis. Conclusions: Collaboration between patient advocacy organisations, governments and health services is needed to ensure the ground lost to the COVID-19 pandemic is regained. Action is required to restore cancer services safely and effectively without delay. Additional resources for organisations that support cancer patients are required to ensure that they continue to provide vital services. Finally, a global plan of action for cancer is required to meet the challenges of any future health crisis.

16.
Philosophy Today ; 64(4):901-905, 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1090208

ABSTRACT

Belying the rhetoric of “We're all in this together,” and “COVID as the great equalizer,” the pandemic has brought into focus the “pre-existing conditions” of inequality-poverty, racism, lack of health care, lack of child care, women's double burden, and the vulnerability of the elderly, among others. The coronavirus reveals gaping inequities in the length and quality of life caused by social and economic “pre-existing conditions.” It is the great unequalizer, the promise and ruse of “We're all in this together.” The new normal for some, is the old normal for many others. © Philosophy Today

17.
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology ; 31:804, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-984641

ABSTRACT

Background: Effective dialysis care during the C19 pandemic has required implemetation of new policies and procedures to ensure adequate care, to avoid contagion in dialysis centers and to minimize unnecesary expossure to medical personnel. Methods: Emory dialysis program provides dialysis care for ~ 750 patients in 4 hemodialysis centers and 3 home dialysis locations in the metro Atlanta area. The first cases of C19 in Georgia were reported on March 2, 2020 and plans to contain the spreading of the disease were implemented in our dialysis units, including mask use, triaging of patients and personnel based on symptoms, telemedicine rounds, cohorting of C19+ patients in a single shift in a designated unit, and physical isolation of nursing home residents while receiving hemodialysis. This report describe the clinical outcomes related to these interventions. Results: Until May 30/2020, 106 patients had been tested (14%). 22 patients were positive for C19 (2.9%) of which 20 were on HD and 2 on PD. Five C19+ patients died (mortality 23%). Patients that tested positive were older (65±13 vs 60±13y/o), mainly African-Americans (90%) with a higher BMI (29 vs 26), more likely to be diabetics (51% vs 44%) and to reside in a Nursing Home (20 vs 10%), with higher prevalence of cardiovascular disease (45 vs 30%). Dialysis-related parameters (albumin, hemoglobin, phophorus, PTH, Kt/V and blood pressure) were similar between those that tested positive vs negative. 4% (31 patients) of our entire dialysis population resides in Nursing Homes. 12 of them have been tested and 8 were C19+ (26%). The dialysis patients that expired were older (69 vs 57y), all were African-Americans and had higher BMI (30 vs 26) and time on dialysis (12.3 vs 5.6 y) than those that survived. We did not observe an increase frequency of hospitalizations or deaths compared to previous months (Figure 1). Conclusions: In our dialysis population the incidence of C19 infection was 2.9% with 14% of patients tested. Mortality was 24%. Deceased patients were older, had a higher BMI and were on dialysis for longer time compared to those that survived. We did not observe an increase rate of hospitalizations or deaths during initial 3 months of the pandemic.

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