Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 17 de 17
Filter
2.
Acad Pediatr ; 2022 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2031066

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: As the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic evolves and vaccines become available to children, pediatricians must navigate vaccination discussions in the setting of rapidly changing vaccine recommendations and approvals. We developed and evaluated an educational curriculum for pediatricians to improve their knowledge about COVID-19 vaccines and confidence in communicating with patients and families about COVID-19 vaccines. METHODS: Five institutions collaborated to develop an online educational curriculum. Utilizing the collaboration's multidisciplinary expertise, we developed a 3-module curriculum focused on the SARS-CoV-2 virus and vaccine basics, logistics and administration of COVID-19 vaccine, and COVID-19 vaccine communication principles. Surveys administered to clinician participants before and after completion of the curriculum assessed knowledge and confidence; a follow-up survey 1 month after the post-survey assessed persistence of initial findings. RESULTS: A total of 152 pediatric providers participated; 72 completed both pre- and post-surveys. The median knowledge score improved from the pre-survey to the post-survey (79%-93%, P < .001). There was an increase in providers' confidence after completing the curriculum, which persisted in the follow-up survey. In the post-survey, 98% of participants had had the opportunity to discuss the COVID-19 vaccine with patients, and most clinicians reported that the modules decreased apprehension some or significantly. CONCLUSIONS: This project demonstrates rapid and feasible deployment of a curriculum providing up-to-date information to front-line clinicians responsible for having complex conversations about COVID-19 vaccine decision-making. Clinicians who completed this curriculum had sustained increased confidence and decreased levels of apprehension when discussing the COVID-19 vaccine.

5.
Acad Pediatr ; 22(8): 1407-1413, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1914088

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To understand the influence of a novel infectious disease epidemic on parent general attitudes about childhood vaccines. METHODS: We conducted a natural experiment utilizing cross-sectional survey data from parents of infants in Washington and Colorado participating in a larger trial that began on September 27, 2019. At enrollment, parents completed the short version of the Parental Attitudes about Childhood Vaccines (PACV-SF), a validated survey scored from 0 to 4, with higher scores representing more negative attitudes. The exposure variable was onset of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in the United States, with the before-period defined as September 27, 2019 to February 28, 2020 and the after-period defined as April 1, 2020-December 10, 2020, with the after-period further separated into proximate (April 1, 2020-July 31, 2020) and distant periods (August 1, 2020-December 10, 2020). The outcome variable was parent negative attitudes about childhood vaccines, defined as a score of ≥2 on the PACV-SF. We estimated the probability of the outcome after (vs before) the exposure using log-binomial regression with generalized estimating equations adjusted for demographic confounding variables. RESULTS: Among 4562 parents, the risk of negative attitudes was lower immediately after (vs before) SARS-CoV-2 onset (adjusted risk ratio [aRR] = 0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.36, 0.94; P = .027), but by August-December 2020, the average rate of negative attitudes was 35% higher than during April-July 2020 (aRR: 1.35; 95% CI: 1.13, 1.61; P = .0009). CONCLUSIONS: A reduced risk of negative general vaccine attitudes observed immediately after SARS-CoV-2 onset was quickly attenuated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Infant , Child , Humans , United States/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/prevention & control , Parents
7.
Pediatr Transplant ; 26(7): e14243, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1685411

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The American Society of Transplantation in conjunction with the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation released a joint statement on August 13, 2021 in which they strongly recommend that solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients and their eligible household members and close contacts be vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2 with an approved COVID-19 vaccine. Some SOT programs have gone further and will refuse to list or transplant candidates unless the candidate and their household are vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: Two general pediatrician-ethicists use current best evidence and moral theory to argue why it is unethical to mandate COVID-19 vaccination for pediatric SOT candidates, their primary support person, and their households. RESULTS: Pediatric vaccine mandates are most justifiable when they prevent the harm of a serious vaccine preventable disease (VPD) in children in settings where transmission is highly likely and there are no alternatives that are effective in preventing transmission that intrude less on individual freedom. An additional justification for a vaccine mandate in the SOT context is stewardship of a scarce resource if there is significant risk of graft loss from the VPD to an unvaccinated SOT candidate or recipient. Current evidence does not support fulfillment of these criteria in pediatric solid organ transplantation. CONCLUSIONS: Making SOT listing contingent on COVID-19 vaccination is problematic. Though there is some risk of harm to a pediatric SOT candidate in remaining unvaccinated, the risk of harm of not being listed and transplanted is greater and overriding.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Organ Transplantation , Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Child , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Transplant Recipients
8.
Lancet ; 398(10317): 2186-2192, 2021 12 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1521624

ABSTRACT

Since the first case of COVID-19 was identified in the USA in January, 2020, over 46 million people in the country have tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Several COVID-19 vaccines have received emergency use authorisations from the US Food and Drug Administration, with the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine receiving full approval on Aug 23, 2021. When paired with masking, physical distancing, and ventilation, COVID-19 vaccines are the best intervention to sustainably control the pandemic. However, surveys have consistently found that a sizeable minority of US residents do not plan to get a COVID-19 vaccine. The most severe consequence of an inadequate uptake of COVID-19 vaccines has been sustained community transmission (including of the delta [B.1.617.2] variant, a surge of which began in July, 2021). Exacerbating the direct impact of the virus, a low uptake of COVID-19 vaccines will prolong the social and economic repercussions of the pandemic on families and communities, especially low-income and minority ethnic groups, into 2022, or even longer. The scale and challenges of the COVID-19 vaccination campaign are unprecedented. Therefore, through a series of recommendations, we present a coordinated, evidence-based education, communication, and behavioural intervention strategy that is likely to improve the success of COVID-19 vaccine programmes across the USA.


Subject(s)
Behavior Therapy , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/transmission , Communication , Immunization Programs , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Politics , United States , Vaccination Refusal/psychology
10.
Acad Pediatr ; 21(4S): S24-S29, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1212327

ABSTRACT

Although vaccines are considered one of the most effective medical interventions to prevent vaccine preventable disease and associated morbidity and mortality, a number of recent outbreaks are threatening the gains made by vaccines. Vaccine hesitancy is a key driver of vaccine refusal and has been associated with vaccine preventable outbreaks. While parents seek information from many sources to inform their vaccine decision-making process, they continue to view their child's pediatric provider as a trusted source of vaccine information. The communication that occurs between a provider and parent with regards to vaccination is critical in reducing concerns and nudging parents toward vaccine acceptance. However, vaccine-hesitant parents raise issues in this encounter that many providers feel ill-equipped to answer, due to lack of training on evidence-based communication strategies. We focus on promising approaches related to patient-provider communication within the context of vaccination. We found empirical evidence that the use of a presumptive format to recommend vaccines, motivational interviewing, and tailoring information to increase message salience are approaches that can positively affect vaccine acceptance. As providers continue to serve as important influencers in the vaccine decision-making process, it is evident that there is a need to continue to identify evidence-based, and practically implementable approaches to mitigate parental vaccine hesitancy. Providers play a key role in improving coverage rates, and therefore it is paramount to seek ways to improve how providers communicate about vaccines.


Subject(s)
Vaccines , Child , Communication , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Parents , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Vaccination , Vaccination Refusal
13.
15.
Health Aff (Millwood) ; 40(3): 419-425, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1063232

ABSTRACT

The US response to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been plagued with politics driving public health and messaging. As a result, COVID-19 vaccine rollout is occurring in an environment ill equipped to achieve broad acceptance of the vaccine. Addressing public concerns unlocks the potential for high vaccine coverage; this is best achieved when science and values, not politics, inform public health. A multifaceted and thorough engagement and communication plan that is responsive to the concerns and values of different groups must be swiftly yet carefully implemented in a coordinated manner by federal, state, and local governments. Effective communication will require rapid and rigorous science to promptly differentiate between adverse events following immunization that are causally related versus simply coincidental. Health care providers, in particular, will need support to process the otherwise potentially overwhelming amount of relevant information and effectively integrate it into discussions with their patients to support their decision making. An equitable COVID-19 immunization program could substantively reduce the disproportionate risks associated with this pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Communication , Immunization Programs , Politics , Public Health , Federal Government , Humans , Science
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL