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1.
J Interpers Violence ; 37(23-24): NP22135-NP22150, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625804

ABSTRACT

Many countries worldwide have implemented dedicated measures, such as shelter at home, to contain the spread of the COVID-19 virus. However, those mitigation measures may have major implications for individuals living with someone abusive or controlling. Domestic violence (DV) may be one of the unintended consequences of public health measures due to increased various stressors and reduced access to support and services. There has been a lack of empirical research on DV victimization among gender and sexual minorities, a population vulnerable to interpersonal violence and its associated adverse health outcomes. This study investigates the prevalence of DV victimization among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Jiangsu Province, China, during the COVID-19 lockdown and its correlates with COVID-19-related psychosocial and health stressors. A total of 413 MSM were recruited via snowball sampling, venue-based, and internet-based sampling from four cities in Jiangsu Province. After providing informed consent, all participants completed study questionnaires, followed by HIV testing. Over a quarter of the participants (27.4%) reported DV victimization during the COVID-19 lockdown, including experience of verbal, physical, or sexual abuse. After adjusting sociodemographic factors, DV victimization was associated with various adverse experiences during the COVID-19 lockdown, including increased stress or anxiety level, increased alcohol use, and housing instability. Study findings underscore the prevalence of DV victimization among MSM during the COVID-19 pandemic in China. The results can inform public health efforts to raise awareness and address DV victimization among MSM in the low- and middle-income country context during the COVID-19 pandemic. Adequate health and social services and economic resources are also critical to address the needs of MSM experiencing DV victimization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Crime Victims , Domestic Violence , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Male , Humans , Homosexuality, Male , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control , Crime Victims/psychology , China/epidemiology
3.
BMJ Glob Health ; 6(9)2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406653

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Testing for COVID-19 and linkage to services is fundamental to successful containment and control of transmission. Yet, knowledge on COVID-19 testing among transgender and non-binary communities remains limited. METHODS: Between October 2020 and November 2020, we examined the prevalence and associations of COVID-19 testing in an online sample of transgender and non-binary people (n=536). Multivariable hierarchical logistic regression analyses examined associations between COVID-19 testing and participants' sociodemographic, mental health, substance use, gender affirmation, economic changes and healthcare experiences. RESULTS: Prevalence of COVID-19 testing in this sample was 35.5% (n=190/536). In the final model, transgender and non-binary participants from upper socioeconomic income background and Europe, who reported having active alcohol use disorder, limited access to gender-affirming surgery, had more than 20% reduction in income, and experienced mistreatment in a health facility due to gender identity had significantly increased odds of COVID-19 testing (all p<0.05); those who reported recent tobacco use had significantly lower odds of COVID-19 testing (p=0.007). CONCLUSIONS: These findings highlight structural disparities in COVID-19 testing and reinforce the importance of increasing testing strategies for transgender and non-binary populations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Transgender Persons , COVID-19 Testing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Gender Identity , Humans , Male , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Couns Psychol ; 69(2): 157-171, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1310779

ABSTRACT

This randomized controlled trial evaluated the effect of a mindfulness-based mobile health (mHealth) intervention, tailored to the pandemic context, among young adult students (N = 114) with elevated anxiety and/or depressive symptoms during quarantine in China, compared to a time- and attention-matched social support-based mHealth control. At baseline, postintervention (1 month), and 2-month follow-up, participants completed self-reports of primary outcomes (anxiety and depression), secondary outcomes (mindfulness and social support), and emotional suppression as a culturally relevant mechanism of change. Feasibility and acceptability were also evaluated. Using intent-to-treat (ITT) analysis, linear mixed effects models showed that compared to social support mHealth, mindfulness mHealth had a superior effect on anxiety (p = .024, between-group d = 0.72). Both conditions improved on depression (baseline-to-FU ds > 1.10, between-group difference not significant, d = 0.36 favoring mindfulness). There was an interaction of Emotional suppression reduction × Condition in the improvement of anxiety and depression. Further, mindfulness mHealth was demonstrated to be more feasible and acceptable in program engagement, evaluation, skills improvement, and perceived benefit. Retention was high in both conditions (>80%). The difference in self-reported adverse effect was nonsignificant (3.9% in mindfulness and 8.7% in social support). Results of this pilot trial suggest that both mindfulness and social support, delivered via mHealth, show promise in reducing distress among young adults in quarantine, with mindfulness being particularly effective in addressing anxiety. Successful implementation and dissemination of this mHealth intervention approach have the potential for addressing the psychological consequences of the pandemic. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Telemedicine , Depression/psychology , Depression/therapy , Humans , Mindfulness/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Quarantine , Students/psychology , Telemedicine/methods , Universities , Young Adult
6.
Gend Work Organ ; 28(4): 1426-1446, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1189684

ABSTRACT

In the United States, nursing is the largest healthcare profession, with over 3.2 million registered nurses (RNs) nationwide and comprised of mostly women. Foreign-trained RNs make up 15 percent of the RN workforce. For over half a century, the U.S. healthcare industry has recruited these RNs in response to nurse shortages in hospitals and nursing homes. Philippines-trained RNs make up 1 out of 20 RNs in this country and continue to be the largest group of foreign-trained nurses today. Recently, the news media has publicized the many deaths of Filipino RNs as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States. Given the imperial historical ties between these two countries in the context of the nursing profession and the enduring labor inequities that persist, this nationally representative study is one of the few to our knowledge to not only quantitatively examine the current work differences in characteristics and experiences of Philippines-trained RNs and U.S.-trained white RNs practicing in the United States today, but to also do so from an intersectionality lens. The overall aim of this paper is to illuminate how these differences may serve as potential factors contributing to the disproportionate number of Filipino nurses' COVID-19 related vulnerability and deaths in the workplace.

7.
Prev Med Rep ; 22: 101350, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1129140

ABSTRACT

With the demand for rapid COVID-19 vaccine development and evaluation, this paper aimed to describe the prevalence and correlates of willingness to participate in COVID-19 vaccine trials among university students in China. A cross-sectional survey with 1912 Chinese university students was conducted during March and April 2020. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify variables associated with willingness to participate. The majority of participants (64.01%) indicated willingness to participate in COVID-19 vaccine trials. Hesitancy over signing informed consent documents, concerns over time necessary for participating in a medical study, and perceived COVID-19 societal stigma were identified as deterrents, whereas lower socioeconomic status, female gender, perception of likely COVID-19 infection during the pandemic, and COVID-19 prosocial behaviors were facilitative factors. Further, public health mistrust and hesitancy over signing informed consent documents had a significant interactive effect on vaccine trial willingness. High standards of ethical and scientific practice are needed in COVID-19 vaccine research, including providing potential participants full and accurate information and ensuring participation free of coercion, socioeconomic inequality, and stigma. Attending to the needs of marginalized groups and addressing psychosocial factors including stigma and public health mistrust may also be important to COVID-19 vaccine development and future uptake.

8.
Global Health ; 17(1): 15, 2021 01 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067248

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has made unprecedented impact on the psychological health of university students, a population vulnerable to distress and mental health disorders. This study investigated psychiatric symptoms (anxiety, depression, and traumatic stress) during state-enforced quarantine among university students in China (N = 1912) through a cross-sectional survey during March and April 2020. RESULTS: Psychiatric symptoms were alarmingly prevalent: 67.05% reported traumatic stress, 46.55% had depressive symptoms, and 34.73% reported anxiety symptoms. Further, 19.56% endorsed suicidal ideation. We explored risk and protective factors of psychological health, including demographic variables, two known protective factors for mental health (mindfulness, perceived social support), four COVID-specific factors (COVID-19 related efficacy, perceived COVID-19 threat, perceived COVID-19 societal stigma, COVID-19 prosocial behavior) and screen media usage. Across symptom domains, mindfulness was associated with lower symptom severity, while COVID-19 related financial stress, perceived COVID-19 societal stigma, and perceived COVID-19 threat were associated with higher symptom severity. COVID-19 threat and COVID-19 stigma showed main and interactive effects in predicting all mental health outcomes, with their combination associated with highest symptom severity. Screen media device usage was positively associated with depression. Female gender and COVID-19 prosocial behavior were associated with higher anxiety, while COVID-19 self-efficacy associated with lower anxiety symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest high need for psychological health promotion among university students during the COVID-19 pandemic and inform an ecological perspective on the detrimental role of stigma during an emerging infectious disease outbreak. Interventions targeting multi-level factors, such as promoting mindfulness and social support at individual and interpersonal levels while reducing public stigma about COVID-19, may be particularly promising. Attending to the needs of disadvantaged groups including those financially impacted by COVID-19 is needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics , Quarantine/psychology , Students/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Protective Factors , Risk Factors , Stress Disorders, Traumatic/epidemiology , Students/statistics & numerical data , Universities , Young Adult
9.
Psychol Trauma ; 12(S1): S25-S27, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-552195

ABSTRACT

This commentary article provides observations on the psychosocial consequences of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) among people in China and articulates a population health perspective to understand and address identified issues. We highlight key psychosocial effects of COVID-19, such as anxiety, insomnia, and trauma response, in the context of salient factors that shape Chinese people's psychological experiences, including the availability of Internet and technology, large-scale quarantine, economic impact, and the rise of xenophobia globally. Further, from a population health perspective, we make recommendations in COVID-19-related research and interventions that aim to promote the psychosocial health of Chinese people. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Anxiety , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Psychological Trauma , Quarantine , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Xenophobia , Adult , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19 , China , Coronavirus Infections/economics , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Promotion , Humans , Pandemics/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Psychological Trauma/etiology , Psychological Trauma/psychology , Psychological Trauma/therapy , Quarantine/economics , Quarantine/psychology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/therapy , Xenophobia/psychology
12.
AIDS Behav ; 24(10): 2748-2750, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-143968
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