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1.
Pain ; 2021 Dec 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574296

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: This study investigated the prevalence of long-term musculoskeletal post-COVID pain and their risk factors in a large cohort of COVID-19 survivors. A multicenter cohort study including patients hospitalised because of COVID-19 in 5 hospitals of Madrid (Spain) during the first wave of the pandemic was conducted. Hospitalisation and clinical data were collected from medical records. Patients were scheduled for a telephone interview after hospital discharge for collecting data about the musculoskeletal post-COVID pain. Anxiety/depressive levels and sleep quality were likewise assessed. From 2000 patients recruited, a total of 1969 individuals (46.4% women, age: 61 years, SD: 16 years) were assessed on average at 8.4 (SD: 1.5) months after discharge. At the time of the study, 887 (45% women) reported musculoskeletal post-COVID pain. According to the presence of previous pain symptoms, the prevalence of "de novo" (new-onset) musculoskeletal post-COVID pain was 74.9%, whereas 25.1% experienced an increase in previous symptoms (exacerbated COVID-related pain). Female sex (odds ratio [OR]: 1.349, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.059-1.720), history of musculoskeletal pain (OR 1.553, 95% CI 1.271-1.898), presence of myalgia (OR 1.546, 95% CI 1.155-2.070) and headache (1.866, 95% CI 1.349-2.580) as COVID-19-associated onset symptoms, and days at hospital (OR 1.013, 95% CI 1.004-1.022) were risk factors associated with musculoskeletal post-COVID pain. In conclusion, musculoskeletal post-COVID pain is present in 45.1% of COVID-19 survivors at 8 months after hospital discharge with most patients developing de novo post-COVID pain. Female sex, history of musculoskeletal pain, presence of myalgia and headache as COVID-19 symptoms at the acute phase, and days at hospital were risk factors associated with musculoskeletal post-COVID pain.

2.
Respiration ; 101(2): 132-141, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435123

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Multicentre studies focussing on specific long-term post-COVID-19 symptoms are scarce. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the levels of fatigue and dyspnoea, repercussions on daily life activities, and risk factors associated with fatigue or dyspnoea in COVID-19 survivors at long term after hospital discharge. METHODS: Age, gender, height, weight, symptoms at hospitalization, pre-existing medical comorbidity, intensive care unit admission, and the presence of cardio-respiratory symptoms developed after severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection were collected from patients who recovered from COVID-19 at 4 hospitals in Madrid (Spain) from March 1 to May 31, 2020 (first COVID-19 wave). The Functional Impairment Checklist was used for evaluating fatigue/dyspnoea levels and functional limitations. RESULTS: A total of 1,142 patients (48% women, age: 61, standard deviation [SD]: 17 years) were assessed 7.0 months (SD 0.6) after hospitalization. Fatigue was present in 61% patients, dyspnoea with activity in 55%, and dyspnoea at rest in 23.5%. Only 355 (31.1%) patients did not exhibit fatigue and/or dyspnoea 7 months after hospitalization. Forty-five per cent reported functional limitations with daily living activities. Risk factors associated with fatigue and dyspnoea included female gender, number of pre-existing comorbidities, and number of symptoms at hospitalization. The number of days at hospital was a risk factor just for dyspnoea. CONCLUSIONS: Fatigue and/or dyspnoea were present in 70% of hospitalized COVID-19 survivors 7 months after discharge. In addition, 45% patients exhibited limitations on daily living activities. Being female, higher number of pre-existing medical comorbidities and number of symptoms at hospitalization were risk factors associated to fatigue/dyspnoea in COVID-19 survivors 7 months after hospitalization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Dyspnea/virology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/virology , Activities of Daily Living , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/psychology , Cohort Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dyspnea/diagnosis , Fatigue/diagnosis , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Spain , Symptom Assessment , Time Factors
5.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(8): 105806, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1171234

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has strained the healthcare systems across the world but its impact on acute stroke care is just being elucidated. We hypothesized a major global impact of COVID-19 not only on stroke volumes but also on various aspects of thrombectomy systems. AIMS: We conducted a convenience electronic survey with a 21-item questionnaire aimed to identify the changes in stroke admission volumes and thrombectomy treatment practices seen during a specified time period of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The survey was designed using Qualtrics software and sent to stroke and neuro-interventional physicians around the world who are part of the Global Executive Committee (GEC) of Mission Thrombectomy 2020, a global coalition under the aegis of Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology, between April 5th and May 15th, 2020. RESULTS: There were 113 responses to the survey across 25 countries with a response rate of 31% among the GEC members. Globally there was a median 33% decrease in stroke admissions and a 25% decrease in mechanical thrombectomy (MT) procedures during the COVID-19 pandemic period until May 15th, 2020 compared to pre-pandemic months. The intubation policy for MT procedures during the pandemic was highly variable across participating centers: 44% preferred intubating all patients, including 25% of centers that changed their policy to preferred-intubation (PI) from preferred non-intubation (PNI). On the other hand, 56% centers preferred not intubating patients undergoing MT, which included 27% centers that changed their policy from PI to PNI. There was no significant difference in rate of COVID-19 infection between PI versus PNI centers (p=0.60) or if intubation policy was changed in either direction (p=1.00). Low-volume (<10 stroke/month) compared with high-volume stroke centers (>20 strokes/month) were less likely to have neurointerventional suite specific written personal protective equipment protocols (74% vs 88%) and if present, these centers were more likely to report them to be inadequate (58% vs 92%). CONCLUSION: Our data provides a comprehensive snapshot of the impact on acute stroke care observed worldwide during the pandemic. Overall, respondents reported decreased stroke admissions as well as decreased cases of MT with no clear preponderance in intubation policy during MT. DATA ACCESS STATEMENT: The corresponding author will consider requests for sharing survey data. The study was exempt from institutional review board approval as it did not involve patient level data.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Global Health/trends , Healthcare Disparities/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Stroke/therapy , Thrombectomy/trends , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Care Surveys , Hospitals, High-Volume/trends , Hospitals, Low-Volume/trends , Humans , Infection Control/trends , Intubation, Intratracheal/trends , Patient Admission/trends , Stroke/diagnosis , Time Factors
6.
The World Bank Research Observer ; 2021.
Article in English | Oxford Academic | ID: covidwho-1093601

ABSTRACT

Relying on a novel dataset covering more than 120,000 firms in 60 countries, this paper contributes to the debate about policies to support businesses through the COVID-19 pandemic. While governments around the world have implemented a wide range of policy support measures, evidence on the reach of these policies, the alignment of measures with firm needs, and their targeting and effectiveness remains scarce. This paper provides the most comprehensive assessment to date of these issues, focusing primarily on developing economies. It shows that policy reach has been limited, especially for more vulnerable firms and countries, and identifies mismatches between policies provided and policies most sought. It also provides some indicative evidence regarding mistargeting of policies and their effectiveness in addressing liquidity constraints and preventing layoffs. This assessment provides some early guidance to policymakers on tailoring their COVID-19 business support packages and points to new directions in data and research efforts needed to guide policy responses to the current pandemic and future crises.

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