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1.
Ijeri-International Journal of Educational Research and Innovation ; - (17):14-26, 2022.
Article in Spanish | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1918378

ABSTRACT

The crisis caused by COVID-19 has had a great impact on society in general and educational systems in particular. In this context, numerous studies carried out before and during the pandemic show the importance of technologies as the main guarantor tools of distance teaching and learning processes. However, there are still numerous gaps to overcome for these processes to be 100% effective. Therefore, this study tries to present an informed and critical judgment of the main variables that have affected the success or failure of virtual educational practices. In this sense, a review of the latest research and educational reports is carried out before and during the pandemic. As a result, the results are presented in three large blocks: initial questions to take into account, digital gaps and contributions for the future. It concludes by making a summary of the main facilitating factors of e-learning (politics, teachers, students, family ...) and deliberates on the training need of all the groups involved.

2.
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation ; 37(SUPPL 3):i212-i213, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1915693

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication among patients hospitalized with COVID-19. The incidence of AKI is estimated to be around 5%-80%, according to the series, but data on renal function evolution is limited. Our main objective was to describe the incidence of AKI in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection;secondarily, we analysed the severity of AKI and medium-term renal function evolution in these patients. METHOD: A retrospective observational study that included patients hospitalized a single hospital, diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 infection, who developed AKI (March- May 2020). We register clinical and demographic characteristics, creatinine upon admission and prior to discharge, as well as creatinine and CKD-EPI glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) after at least 3 months after discharge. CKD was defined according to KDIGO stages based on the eGFR (G3-G5). The KDIGO classification was used to define and classify AKI. Recovery of kidney function was defined as difference in at discharge or post-hospitalization creatinine < 0.3 mg/dL with respect basal creatinine. The clinical follow-up ranged from admission to death or end of study. RESULTS: Of 258 patients hospitalized with SARS-CoV-2 infection, AKI occurred in 73 (28.3%). 63% (n = 46) were men;the mean of age was 69 years (57-76). DRA severity: 35 (48%) KDIGO-1, 15 (21%) KDIGO-2 and 23 (31%) KDIGO-3. The mean stay was associated with the severity of AKI: 7 days (3-11) for KDIGO-1, 11 days for KDIGO-2 (5-22) and 12 days (8-35) for KDIGO-3 (P = .02). The stage of CKD established differences in the severity of AKI: 66.6% (n = 6) of the patients with CKD G4-G5 presented AKI-KDIGO 3 versus only 25.0% (n = 4) in the CKD-G3 patients (P = .02). Admission to the ICU was more frequent in KDIGO 2-3 versus KDIGO-1 [39% (n = 15) versus 9% (n = 3);P < .01]. Of the 48 patients discharged, 30 (62.5%) had recovered their baseline renal function upon discharge. Only 2 are still on RRT after 8 months (2.7% of all patients). Of the 25 patients died (34% of patients with AKI) with a median time of 3 days from DRA diagnosis (1-8). Renal function of 35 patients was monitored, which correspond to 19 (54%) KDIGO- 1, 8 (23%) KDIGO-2, 8 (23%) KDIGO-3 stages. In these patients, analytical control starting 3 months after hospitalization revealed FG 66 (SD 30;56-76) mL/min/1.73 m2. We have not found differences in renal function between pre- and posthospitalization in related test. A total of 77% (n = 37) of discharged patients recovered their baseline renal function in the post-hospitalization control. CONCLUSION: The incidence of AKI in the context of COVID-19 in our series was 28.3%, with an associated mortality of 34.2%. Most of the patients presented with AKI KDIGO 1 (47.9%). The severity of AKI is associated with a longer hospital stay, admission to the ICU and the requirement for RRT. The advanced stages of CKD preadmission showed more severity of AKI. The maintenance in TRS in our series has been 2.7%. Patients who were discharged for recovery/improvement of COVID-19 had normalized kidney function during subsequent follow-up, regardless of the severity of the AKI developed on admission for COVID-19. (Figure Presented).

3.
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation ; 37(SUPPL 3):i209, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1915691

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The incidence of acute renal failure (ARF) is frequent and has an implication in the morbidity and mortality of SARS-CoV-2 infection. METHOD: A retrospective descriptive study of patients admitted for SARS-CoV-2 infection during the first (G1) and second (G2) waves who presented with ARF. They correspond to the period from March to May 2020 (G1) and from August to December 2020 (G2). We compare populations, outcomes and treatments. RESULTS: A total of 73 patients in the first wave (G1), with a cumulative incidence (CI) of 28.3% (G1), compared with 58 patients in the second wave (G2), with a CI of 8% (G2). The mean age was higher in G2 [65.8 ± 15 years (G1);75.3 ± 14 (G2);P <.05], with no difference regarding sex [63% (G1);54% (G2)]. In G2, there was a higher proportion of patients with cardiovascular disease [23% (G1);57% (G2)], hypertension [56% (G1);83% (G2)]. The baseline glomerular filtration rate (GFR) being similar for both groups (CKD EPI: 69 mL/min/1.732 (G1);P = .27). In the first wave, the mean days from admission to ARF was 3.1 days ± 4.2, and 42% of the patients were diagnosed at admission (31 patients). In the second, it was 2.9 days ± 5.7, of which 60% at admission (35 patients). The most prevalent cause was prerenal in both. Higher proportion in G1 of KDIGO stage 3 (G1: 30% versus G2: 17%) and renal replacement therapy (RRT) (G1: 9 versusG2: 2 patients). Only 3 patients remained in RRT in G1 and 1 patient in G2. In G1, 64% recovered their GFR [mean time (MT): 7.5 ± 8 days], and the percentage of deaths was 34%. In G2, 72% recovered GFR (MT: 16 ± 25 days), and 19% of patients died. CONCLUSION: Despite a lower age and comorbidity of the first wave patients, the severity and lethality was higher. There were no differences in the proportion of patients who recovered their baseline renal function, although the recovery time was longer in the second wave. (Table Presented).

4.
Topics in Antiviral Medicine ; 30(1 SUPPL):101-102, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1880960

ABSTRACT

Background: Understanding the determinants of long-term immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 and the concurrent impact of vaccination and emerging variants of concern will guide optimal strategies to achieve global protection against the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: A prospective cohort of 332 COVID 19 patients was followed beyond one year. Plasma neutralizing activity was evaluated using HIV-based reporter pseudoviruses expressing different SARS-CoV-2 spikes and was longitudinally analyzed using mixed-effects models. Results: Long-term neutralizing activity was stable beyond one year after infection in mild/asymptomatic and hospitalized participants. However, longitudinal models suggest that hospitalized individuals generate both short-and long-lived memory B cells, while responses of non-hospitalized were dominated by long-lived B cells. In both groups, vaccination boosted responses to natural infection. In unvaccinated participants, viral variants, mainly beta, reduced the efficacy of long-term (>300 days from infection) neutralization. Importantly, despite showing higher neutralization titers, hospitalized patients showed lower cross-neutralization of beta variant compared to non-hospitalized. Multivariate analysis identified severity of primary infection as the factor that independently determines both the magnitude and the inferior cross-neutralization activity of long-term neutralizing responses. Conclusion: Neutralizing response induced by SARS-CoV-2 is heterogeneous in magnitude but stable beyond one year after infection. Vaccination boosts these long-lasting natural neutralizing responses and should help counteract the resistance to neutralization of variants of concern such as the beta variant. Severity of primary infection determines higher magnitude but poorer quality of long-term neutralizing responses.

5.
Revista Medica Herediana ; 33(1):47-50, 2022.
Article in Spanish | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1822665

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 predominantly affects the respiratory tract, but extrapulmonary involvement including the nervous system has been reported. We report two patients who presented SARS-CoV-2 associated Guillain-Barre syndrome.

6.
Economic Information Bulletin - USDA Economic Research Service|2021. (230):18 pp. ; 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1716962

ABSTRACT

The 2021 edition of Rural America at a Glance focuses on aspects affecting the resiliency and recovery of rural communities in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, including population and employment change, intensity of infection and vaccination rates, and internet availability and adoption.

7.
Sociologia e Antropologia ; 11(Special Issue):181-186, 2021.
Article in English, Portuguese | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1502164

ABSTRACT

The article has the intention to think about the notion of social order in the covid-19 pandemic context. The argument is that dissemination of the virus encloses a dimension of counter-modernity, so far central elements of classical modernity (XIX century) are adjourn, mainly those referred to isolation and mobility. © 2021. All Rights Reserved.

8.
Health Services Research ; 56:19-20, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1426786
9.
Jama Pediatrics ; 175(8):871-871, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1357914
10.
Proceedings of the Xxii 2020 Ieee International Autumn Meeting on Power, Electronics and Computing ; 2020.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1271420

ABSTRACT

The Covid19 pandemic has had a great impact worldwide, it has become a major problem due to the demand for care in hospitals and clinics despite the low level of mortality. This is because the disease has spread rapidly as the spread between people is accelerated. So in this document we propose using a classification-oriented machine learning method, we do a classic data science process so that we can perform noise cleaning and data processing to do descriptive statistical analysis in such a way that the most important variables or factors are identified through unsupervised learning. And with this it is appreciated that the most important variables for the risk of infection and mortality that Covid-19 disease can have are diseases that affect the immune system, such as diabetes, heart disease, hypertension and also kidney disease. They can cause serious kidney problems. And the evaluation of our method will be carried out through quality measures. Finally, this work opens the door to other investigations with the aim of conducting centralized investigations on each variable related to Covid-19, in order to find relevant information that can promote an improvement in the current situation.

11.
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology ; 31:266, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-984312

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients on HD or PD are likely to be at increased risk of COVID-19 and its complications because they have multiple comorbid conditions. There is a lack of evidence about the optimal management and even clinical manifestations because clinical presentation is highly variable. The delayed diagnosis is because it's not recognized by the treating centers and the confusion with patients with fluid overload or uremic syndrome can be fatal in this population. Methods: Retrospective, observational, single-center study in Mexico. We analyzed the clinical manifestations and outcomes of all maintenance HD patients hospitalized with COVID-19 from April 9th to May 31st, 2020 as confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction Results: 20 patients followed in our hospital with median age of 45.2±13.8 years, 50% were men. All the patients have HTA (100%), DM (50%), the most common symptoms at admission were asthenia (75%), dyspnea (65%), cough (55%) followed by myalgias (50%) and fever (45%). Poor oxygen saturation (<95%) breathing room air was observed in 18 patients (90%) with mean oxygen saturation of 77± 9%. Lung abnormalities on initial chest X-ray were observed in all patients. Peripheral ground-glassopacities, the typical radiologic pattern, were bilateral in 13 patients and unilateral in 7. Laboratory studies with lymphopenia in 85% of patients with a mean of 0.7+0.38. There were no differences baseline leukocyte or lymphocyte from patients who survived vs from those who died. The mortality rate (40%) was much higher than that observed in the general population (8%). Mortality was higher in women. Conclusions: The impact of this virus on patients with CKD is poorly understood. The evaluation of the nephrologist must be very detailed, most of the patients had mild dyspnea, however on physical examination, desaturation and radiological images were suggestive of infection by SARS-CoV2. The current situation provides a unique opportunity to gather vital information to process and learn from the experience worldwide. These results will allow us to treat them in a timely manner and reduce lethality in dialysis patients.

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