Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 2 de 2
Filter
1.
Crit Care Explor ; 3(4): e0377, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211428

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the differences in clinical course, ventilator mechanics, and outcomes of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 secondary to acute respiratory distress syndrome infection compared with a historical cohort of acute respiratory distress syndrome. DESIGN: Comparative case-control study. SETTING: Multicenter, comprehensive tertiary healthcare facility in Detroit, MI. PATIENTS/SUBJECTS: Adult patients hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019 secondary to acute respiratory distress syndrome infection were compared with patients hospitalized with acute respiratory distress syndrome prior to the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic (control). INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: We included 384 patients in the analysis. Inpatient mortality was significantly higher in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 secondary to acute respiratory distress syndrome infection compared with controls (64% vs 49%; p = 0.007). Despite both groups demonstrating similar ventilatory function and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score on day 1 of intubation, with similar lung compliance throughout the study period, patients with coronavirus disease 2019 secondary to acute respiratory distress syndrome infection demonstrated progressive hypoxia compared with controls across the study period. Similarly, higher positive end-expiratory pressure levels and increased use of paralytics were observed in the patients with coronavirus disease 2019 secondary to acute respiratory distress syndrome infection group. On univariate analysis of the entire cohort, significant risk factors for inpatient mortality included coronavirus disease 2019 infection (p = 0.007), older age (p < 0.001), high Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score (p = 0.003), vasopressor use (p = 0.039), paralytic use (p < 0.001), higher positive end-expiratory pressure levels on day 3 (p = 0.027) and day 7 (p < 0.001), in addition to acute respiratory distress syndrome severity on both days 3 (p = 0.008) and 7 (p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis identified coronavirus disease 2019 infection (odds ratio, 1.939; p = 0.021), older age (odds ratio, 1.042; p < 0.001), paralytic use (odds ratio, 3.366; p < 0.001), and higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score (odds ratio, 1.152; p = 0.027) as significant predictors of mortality across the entire cohort. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with coronavirus disease 2019 secondary to acute respiratory distress syndrome infection demonstrated higher mortality compared with control patients hospitalized with acute respiratory distress syndrome prior to the pandemic, with progressive hypoxia throughout the study period, despite similar lung mechanics and initial Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score. Coronavirus disease 2019 infection, older age, paralytic use, and higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores were independent risk factors for 28-day mortality across the entire cohort.

2.
Chest ; 158(3): 1268-1281, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-728475

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has swept the globe and is causing significant morbidity and mortality. Given that the virus is transmitted via droplets, open airway procedures such as bronchoscopy pose a significant risk to health-care workers (HCWs). The goal of this guideline was to examine the current evidence on the role of bronchoscopy during the COVID-19 pandemic and the optimal protection of patients and HCWs. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A group of approved panelists developed key clinical questions by using the Population, Intervention, Comparator, and Outcome (PICO) format that addressed specific topics on bronchoscopy related to COVID-19 infection and transmission. MEDLINE (via PubMed) was systematically searched for relevant literature and references were screened for inclusion. Validated evaluation tools were used to assess the quality of studies and to grade the level of evidence to support each recommendation. When evidence did not exist, suggestions were developed based on consensus using the modified Delphi process. RESULTS: The systematic review and critical analysis of the literature based on six PICO questions resulted in six statements: one evidence-based graded recommendation and 5 ungraded consensus-based statements. INTERPRETATION: The evidence on the role of bronchoscopy during the COVID-19 pandemic is sparse. To maximize protection of patients and HCWs, bronchoscopy should be used sparingly in the evaluation and management of patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 infections. In an area where community transmission of COVID-19 infection is present, bronchoscopy should be deferred for nonurgent indications, and if necessary to perform, HCWs should wear personal protective equipment while performing the procedure even on asymptomatic patients.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Bronchoscopy/standards , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL