Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 9 de 9
Filter
1.
JTCVS open ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1870883

ABSTRACT

Objectives The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic negatively impacted cardiothoracic (CT) surgery, with changes in clinical, academic, and personal responsibilities. We hypothesized that the pandemic may disproportionately impact female academic CT surgeons, accentuating preexisting sex disparities. This study assessed sex differences in authorship of 2 major CT surgery journals during the early part of the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods All accepted submissions to The Annals of Thoracic Surgery and The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery between April and August of 2019 and the same period in 2020 were reviewed. Article type and author characteristics were obtained from the journals. Author sex was predicted using a validated multinational database (Genderize.io) and verified with authors' institutional and public professional profiles. Results In total, 1106 submissions were accepted during the 2019 period, whereas 900 articles (18.6% decrease) were accepted during the same period in 2020. Original research articles comprised 33.3% of the 2019 articles but only 4.9% of the 2020 articles. Female authors contributed to 39.3% (23.1% original research and 16.2% nonoriginal articles) and 29.4% (3.3% original research and 26.1% nonoriginal articles) of articles during the 2019 and 2020 periods, respectively. This represents a marked change in the type of articles that female authors contributed to. Conclusions Early on during the COVID-19 pandemic, the type of articles accepted, and authorship demographic changed. There was a decrease in contribution of female-authored CT surgery articles submitted to both journals, especially for original research. Future research will elucidate the long-term impact of the pandemic on sex disparities in academic productivity. Video Graphical Sex differences in authorship of the 2 highest-impact CT surgery journals. Early in the COVID-19 pandemic (April to August of 2020), there was a change in the type of articles accepted and the authorship demographic, relative to the same period in 2019. Original research articles accepted to CT surgery journals declined whereas nonoriginal articles increased. Female authors contributed more to nonoriginal articles and less to original articles during the pandemic.

2.
JTCVS Open ; 2022 May 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1852248

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic negatively impacted cardiothoracic (CT) surgery, with changes in clinical, academic, and personal responsibilities. We hypothesized that the pandemic may disproportionately impact female academic CT surgeons, accentuating preexisting sex disparities. This study assessed sex differences in authorship of 2 major CT surgery journals during the early part of the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: All accepted submissions to The Annals of Thoracic Surgery and The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery between April and August of 2019 and the same period in 2020 were reviewed. Article type and author characteristics were obtained from the journals. Author sex was predicted using a validated multinational database (Genderize.io) and verified with authors' institutional and public professional profiles. Results: In total, 1106 submissions were accepted during the 2019 period, whereas 900 articles (18.6% decrease) were accepted during the same period in 2020. Original research articles comprised 33.3% of the 2019 articles but only 4.9% of the 2020 articles. Female authors contributed to 39.3% (23.1% original research and 16.2% nonoriginal articles) and 29.4% (3.3% original research and 26.1% nonoriginal articles) of articles during the 2019 and 2020 periods, respectively. This represents a marked change in the type of articles that female authors contributed to. Conclusions: Early on during the COVID-19 pandemic, the type of articles accepted, and authorship demographic changed. There was a decrease in contribution of female-authored CT surgery articles submitted to both journals, especially for original research. Future research will elucidate the long-term impact of the pandemic on sex disparities in academic productivity.

3.
Can J Cardiol ; 37(10): 1547-1554, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439940

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic has dramatically altered the delivery of healthcare services, resulting in significant referral pattern changes, delayed presentations, and procedural delays. Our objective was to determine the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on all-cause mortality in patients awaiting commonly performed cardiac procedures. METHODS: Clinical and administrative data sets were linked to identify all adults referred for: (1) percutaneous coronary intervention; (2) coronary artery bypass grafting; (3) valve surgery; and (4) transcatheter aortic valve implantation, from January 2014 to September 2020 in Ontario, Canada. Piece-wise regression models were used to determine the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on referrals and procedural volume. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the effect of the pandemic on waitlist mortality for the 4 procedures. RESULTS: We included 584,341 patients who were first-time referrals for 1 of the 4 procedures, of whom 37,718 (6.4%) were referred during the pandemic. The pandemic period was associated with a significant decline in the number of referrals and procedures completed compared with the prepandemic period. Referral during the pandemic period was a significant predictor for increased all-cause mortality for the percutaneous coronary intervention (hazard ratio, 1.83; 95% confidence interval, 1.47-2.27) and coronary artery bypass grafting (hazard ratio, 1.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.28-3.01), but not for surgical valve or transcatheter aortic valve implantation referrals. Procedural wait times were shorter during the pandemic period compared with the prepandemic period. CONCLUSIONS: There was a significant decrease in referrals and procedures completed for cardiac procedures during the pandemic period. Referral during the pandemic was associated with increased all-cause mortality while awaiting coronary revascularization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Coronary Artery Bypass/statistics & numerical data , Delayed Diagnosis , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/statistics & numerical data , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement/statistics & numerical data , Waiting Lists/mortality , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/psychology , Cardiovascular Diseases/surgery , Delayed Diagnosis/psychology , Delayed Diagnosis/statistics & numerical data , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Ontario/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Time-to-Treatment/organization & administration
5.
J Card Surg ; 36(9): 3040-3051, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266339

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had an unprecedented impact on health care and cardiac surgery. We report cardiac surgeons' concerns, perceptions, and responses during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A detailed survey was sent to recruit participating adult cardiac surgery centers in North America. Data regarding cardiac surgeons' perceptions and changes in practice were analyzed. RESULTS: Our study comprises 67 institutions with diverse geographic distribution across North America. Nurses were most likely to be redeployed (88%), followed by advanced care practitioners (69%), trainees (28%), and surgeons (25%). Examining surgeon concerns in regard to COVID-19, they were most worried with exposing their family to COVID-19 (81%), followed by contracting COVID-19 (68%), running out of personal protective equipment (PPE) (28%), and hospital resources (28%). In terms of PPE conservation strategies among users of N95 respirators, nearly half were recycling via decontamination with ultraviolet light (49%), followed by sterilization with heat (13%) and at home or with other modalities (13%). Reuse of N95 respirators for 1 day (22%), 1 week (21%) or 1 month (6%) was reported. There were differences in adoption of methods to conserve N95 respirators based on institutional pandemic phase and COVID-19 burden, with higher COVID-19 burden institutions more likely to resort to PPE conservation strategies. CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrates the impact of COVID-19 on North American cardiac surgeons. Our study should stimulate further discussions to identify optimal solutions to improve workforce preparedness for subsequent surges, as well as facilitate the navigation of future healthcare crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Surgeons , Adult , Decontamination , Humans , Pandemics , Perception , SARS-CoV-2
6.
CJC Open ; 3(5): 627-630, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1039311

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has exposed a work-life (im)balance that has been present but not openly discussed in medicine, surgery, and science for decades. The pandemic has exposed inequities in existing institutional structure and policies concerning clinical workload, research productivity, and/or teaching excellence inadvertently privileging those who do not have significant caregiving responsibilities or those who have the resources to pay for their management. METHODS: We sought to identify the challenges facing multidisciplinary faculty and trainees with dependents, and highlight a number of possible strategies to address challenges in work-life (im)balance. RESULTS: To date, there are no Canadian-based data to quantify the physical and mental effect of COVID-19 on health care workers, multidisciplinary faculty, and trainees. As the pandemic evolves, formal strategies should be discussed with an intersectional lens to promote equity in the workforce, including (but not limited to): (1) the inclusion of broad representation (including equal representation of women and other marginalized persons) in institutional-based pandemic response and recovery planning and decision-making; (2) an evaluation (eg, institutional-led survey) of the effect of the pandemic on work-life balance; (3) the establishment of formal dialogue (eg, workshops, training, and media campaigns) to normalize coexistence of work and caregiving responsibilities and to remove stigma of gender roles; (4) a reevaluation of workload and promotion reviews; and (5) the development of formal mentorship programs to support faculty and trainees. CONCLUSIONS: We believe that a multistrategy approach needs to be considered by stakeholders (including policy-makers, institutions, and individuals) to create sustainable working conditions during and beyond this pandemic.


CONTEXTE: La pandémie de COVID-19 a mis en lumière le déséquilibre entre travail et vie personnelle qui règne depuis des décennies dans les milieux de la médecine, de la chirurgie et des sciences, mais dont on ne parlait pas ouvertement. La pandémie a en effet mis au jour des iniquités dans la structure et les politiques des établissements en matière de charge de travail clinique, de productivité de la recherche et d'excellence en enseignement, qui favorisent par inadvertance les personnes qui n'ont pas de responsabilités familiales importantes ou qui ont les ressources nécessaires pour leur prise en charge. MÉTHODOLOGIE: Nous avons tenté de cerner les difficultés auxquelles font face les enseignants multidisciplinaires et les stagiaires ayant des personnes à charge, et nous proposons un certain nombre de stratégies possibles pour faciliter la conciliation travail-vie personnelle. RÉSULTATS: À ce jour, il n'existe pas de données canadiennes permettant de quantifier les répercussions physiques et mentales de la pandémie de COVID-19 sur les travailleurs de la santé, les enseignants multidisciplinaires et les stagiaires. Au fil de l'évolution de la pandémie, il conviendrait de formuler des stratégies officielles à la lumière des commentaires d'intervenants des différents secteurs concernés, afin de promouvoir l'équilibre au sein des effectifs; ces stratégies pourraient notamment inclure ce qui suit (sans toutefois s'y limiter) : 1) l'inclusion d'une vaste représentation (y compris une représentation égale des femmes et des autres personnes marginalisées) pour la réponse à la pandémie dans les établissements, la planification du rétablissement et la prise de décisions; 2) une évaluation (p. ex. au moyen d'un sondage mené sous la direction des établissements) des répercussions de la pandémie sur la conciliation travail-vie personnelle; 3) l'établissement d'un dialogue formel (p. ex. ateliers, activités de formation et campagnes dans les médias) afin de normaliser la coexistence des responsabilités professionnelles et familiales et d'éliminer la stigmatisation associée aux rôles des sexes; 4) une réévaluation de la charge de travail et des promotions; et 5) la mise sur pied de programmes formels de mentorat pour soutenir les enseignants et les stagiaires. CONCLUSIONS: Nous croyons que les intervenants (décideurs, établissements et personnes) devraient envisager une approche multistratégie afin d'instaurer des conditions de travail viables pendant la pandémie et par la suite.

8.
Can J Cardiol ; 36(7): 1139-1143, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-172998

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has had a profound global effect. Its rapid transmissibility has forced whole countries to adopt strict measures to contain its spread. As part of necessary pandemic planning, most Canadian cardiac surgical programs have prioritized and delayed elective procedures in an effort to reduce the burden on the health care system and to mobilize resources in the event of a pandemic surge. While the number of COVID-19 cases continue to increase worldwide, new cases have begun to decline in many jurisdictions. This "flattening of the curve" has inevitably prompted discussions around reopening of the economy, relaxing some public health restrictions, and resuming nonurgent health care delivery. This document provides a template for cardiac surgical programs to begin to ramp-up the delivery of cardiac surgery in a deliberate and graded fashion as the COVID-19 pandemic burden begins to ease that is guided by 3 principles. First, all recommendations from public health authorities regarding COVID-19 containment must continue to be followed to minimize disease spread, ensure patient safety, and protect health care personnel. Second, patients awaiting elective cardiac surgery need to be proactively managed, reprioritizing those with high-risk anatomy or whose clinical status is deteriorating. Finally, case volumes should be steadily increased in a mutually agreed upon fashion and must balance the clinical needs of patients awaiting surgery against the overall requirements of the health care system.


Subject(s)
Cardiac Surgical Procedures/standards , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , COVID-19 , Canada , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cost of Illness , Female , Humans , Male , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Risk Assessment , Safety Management/organization & administration , Societies, Medical/organization & administration , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data
9.
Can J Cardiol ; 36(6): 952-955, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-77143

ABSTRACT

On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared that COVID-19 was a pandemic.1 At that time, only 118,000 cases had been reported globally, 90% of which had occurred in 4 countries.1 Since then, the world landscape has changed dramatically. As of March 31, 2020, there are now nearly 800,000 cases, with truly global involvement.2 Countries that were previously unaffected are currently experiencing mounting rates of the novel coronavirus infection with associated increases in COVID-19-related deaths. At present, Canada has more than 8000 cases of COVID-19, with considerable variation in rates of infection among provinces and territories.3 Amid concerns over growing resource constraints, cardiac surgeons from across Canada have been forced to make drastic changes to their clinical practices. From prioritizing and delaying elective cases to altering therapeutic strategies in high-risk patients, cardiac surgeons, along with their heart teams, are having to reconsider how best to manage their patients. It is with this in mind that the Canadian Society of Cardiac Surgeons (CSCS) and its Board of Directors have come together to formulate a series of guiding statements. With strong representation from across the country and the support of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society, the authors have attempted to provide guidance to their colleagues on the subjects of leadership roles that cardiac surgeons may assume during this pandemic: patient assessment and triage, risk reduction, and real-time sharing of expertise and experiences.


Subject(s)
Cardiac Surgical Procedures/methods , Cardiovascular Diseases , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Canada , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/surgery , Comorbidity , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Selection , Risk Management/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , Triage/methods , Triage/organization & administration
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL