Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 5 de 5
Filter
1.
BMJ Open ; 12(4), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1794501

ABSTRACT

IntroductionThere is an urgent need to reduce the burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), particularly in low-and middle-income countries, where the greatest burden lies. Yet, there is little research concerning the specific issues involved in scaling up NCD interventions targeting low-resource settings. We propose to examine this gap in up to 27 collaborative projects, which were funded by the Global Alliance for Chronic Diseases (GACD) 2019 Scale Up Call, reflecting a total funding investment of approximately US$50 million. These projects represent diverse countries, contexts and adopt varied approaches and study designs to scale-up complex, evidence-based interventions to improve hypertension and diabetes outcomes. A systematic inquiry of these projects will provide necessary scientific insights into the enablers and challenges in the scale up of complex NCD interventions.Methods and analysisWe will apply systems thinking (a holistic approach to analyse the inter-relationship between constituent parts of scaleup interventions and the context in which the interventions are implemented) and adopt a longitudinal mixed-methods study design to explore the planning and early implementation phases of scale up projects. Data will be gathered at three time periods, namely, at planning (TP), initiation of implementation (T0) and 1-year postinitiation (T1). We will extract project-related data from secondary documents at TP and conduct multistakeholder qualitative interviews to gather data at T0 and T1. We will undertake descriptive statistical analysis of TP data and analyse T0 and T1 data using inductive thematic coding. The data extraction tool and interview guides were developed based on a literature review of scale-up frameworks.Ethics and disseminationThe current protocol was approved by the Monash University Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC number 23482). Informed consent will be obtained from all participants. The study findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and more broadly through the GACD network.

2.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 31(4): 106385, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1747726

ABSTRACT

The inaugural African Stroke Organization Conference (ASOC) aimed to create a forum to discuss the latest stroke science, highlight opportunities to address the high burden of stroke in Africa, develop a viable pipeline of emerging African stroke researchers, honor leading scientists and policy makers, and provide networking avenues to bolster future collaboration. Using a virtual platform, ASOC was held from Nov 3-4, 2021, and was attended by 236 participants. ASOC 2021 sessions included: (1) Osuntokun Award Lecture delivered by Prof. Richard Walker of Newcastle University; (2) Distinguished Policy Maker Lecture delivered by Dr. Raj Tajudeen of the African Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; (3) Invited presentations by prominent global stroke academicians on acute stroke, vascular malformations, vascular brain injury, Covid-19, nursing/allied care, rehabilitation/recovery, health services, imaging, pediatric stroke, precision medicine, and unusual causes of stroke; (4) six oral scientific abstract presentations; and (5) fifteen moderated oral poster presentations. Other sessions were (i) Vascular Brain Trust where early career African scholars presented manuscripts and grant proposals under development for feedback from seasoned researchers (ii) Moving on Up during which presentations were given to early career scholars about pathways for success in funding and advancement. A capstone event was the Frontiers of Research in Africa session which showcased the work and capabilities of 20 scientists and sites in Africa. All the ASOC sessions were lively and post-conference feedback from attendees showed high levels of satisfaction for the conference platforms and content. The ASOC marks a new dawn in the era of an escalating stroke burden in Africa, and it is anticipated to serve as a catalyst for exponentially building the capacity, careers, collaborations, and contributions of Africans to ameliorating stroke within and beyond the continent.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stroke , Capacity Building , Child , Humans , Research Personnel , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/therapy , United States
3.
Stroke ; 53(3): 1043-1050, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714486

ABSTRACT

For more than a year, the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has had a devastating effect on global health. High-, low, and middle-income countries are struggling to cope with the spread of newer mutant strains of the virus. Delivery of acute stroke care remains a priority despite the pandemic. In order to maintain the time-dependent processes required to optimize delivery of intravenous thrombolysis and endovascular therapy, most countries have reorganized infrastructure to optimize human resources and critical services. Low-and-middle income countries (LMIC) have strained medical resources at baseline and often face challenges in the delivery of stroke systems of care (SSOC). This position statement aims to produce pragmatic recommendations on methods to preserve the existing SSOC during COVID-19 in LMIC and propose best stroke practices that may be low cost but high impact and commonly shared across the world.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Developing Countries , Global Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke , American Heart Association , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/therapy , United States/epidemiology
4.
Int J Stroke ; 17(1): 9-17, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488374

ABSTRACT

For more than a year, the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has had a devastating effect on global health. High-, low-, and middle-income countries are struggling to cope with the spread of newer mutant strains of the virus. Delivery of acute stroke care remains a priority despite the pandemic. In order to maintain the time-dependent processes required to optimize delivery of intravenous thrombolysis and endovascular therapy, most countries have reorganized infrastructure to optimize human resources and critical services. Low-and-middle income countries (LMIC) have strained medical resources at baseline and often face challenges in the delivery of stroke systems of care (SSOC). This position statement aims to produce pragmatic recommendations on methods to preserve the existing SSOC during COVID-19 in LMIC and propose best stroke practices that may be low cost but high impact and commonly shared across the world.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stroke , American Heart Association , Developing Countries , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/therapy , United States/epidemiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL