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1.
Journal of neurological surgery Part B, Skull base ; 84(1):2023/07/01 00:00:00.000, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2230528

ABSTRACT

Objective  The purpose of this study was to evaluate pituitary tumor patient satisfaction with telemedicine, patient preference for telemedicine, potential socioeconomic benefit of telemedicine, and patients' willingness to proceed with surgery based on a telemedicine visit alone. Method  In total, 134 patients who had pituitary surgery and a telemedicine visit during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic (April 23, 2020–March 4, 2021) were called to participate in a 13-part questionnaire. Chi-square, ANOVA, and Wilcoxon Rank Sum tests were used to determine significance. Result  Of 134 patients contacted, 90 responded (67%). Ninety-five percent were "satisfied” or "very satisfied” with their telemedicine visit, with 62% stating their visit was "the same” or "better” than previous in-person appointments. Eighty-two percent of the patients rated their telemedicine visit as "easy” or "very easy.” On average, patients saved 150 minutes by using telemedicine compared with patient reported in-person visit times. Seventy-seven percent of patients reported the need to take off from work for in-person visits, compared with just 12% when using telemedicine. Forty-nine percent of patients preferred in-person visits, 34% preferred telemedicine, and 17% had no preference. Fifty percent of patients said they would feel comfortable proceeding with surgery based on a telemedicine visit alone. Patients with both initial evaluation and follow-up conducted via telemedicine were more likely to feel comfortable proceeding with surgery based on a telemedicine visit alone compared with patients who had only follow-up telemedicine visits ( p  = 0.051). Conclusion  Many patients are satisfied with telemedicine visits and feel comfortable proceeding with surgery based on a telemedicine visit alone. Telemedicine is an important adjunct to increase access to care at a Pituitary Center of Excellence.

3.
World Neurosurg ; 146: 148-149, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-971146

ABSTRACT

We present a case of a 28-year-old woman with a history of severe headaches and pituitary insufficiency. She was found to have a large, enhancing, sellar mass consistent with a pituitary adenoma. The patient's surgical care was delayed due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, and follow-up imaging revealed spontaneous involution of the sellar mass. Spontaneous involution of pituitary masses has been described but not often encountered in clinical practice. This case highlights that follow-up imaging is necessary when scheduling elective surgeries during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Adenoma/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/prevention & control , Neoplasm Regression, Spontaneous , Pituitary Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Neoplasm Regression, Spontaneous/pathology , Pandemics
4.
Neurosurgery ; 87(4): 854-856, 2020 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-641027

ABSTRACT

Even though neurosurgeons exercise these enormous and versatile skills, the COVID-19 pandemic has shaken the fabrics of the global neurosurgical family, jeopardizing human lives, and forcing the entire world to be locked down. We stand on the shoulders of the giants and will not forget their examples and their teachings. We will work to the best of our ability to honor their memory. Professor Harvey Cushing said: "When to take great risks; when to withdraw in the face of unexpected difficulties; whether to force an attempted enucleation of a pathologically favorable tumor to its completion with the prospect of an operative fatality, or to abandon the procedure short of completeness with the certainty that after months or years even greater risks may have to be faced at a subsequent session-all these require surgical judgment which is a matter of long experience." It is up to us, therefore, to keep on the noble path that we have decided to undertake, to accumulate the surgical experience that these icons have shown us, the fruit of sacrifice and obstinacy. Our tribute goes to them; we will always remember their excellent work and their brilliant careers that will continue to enlighten all of us.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/history , Neurosurgery/history , Pandemics/history , Pneumonia, Viral/history , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , History, 21st Century , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Neurol India ; 68(Supplement): S134-S136, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-628276

ABSTRACT

Even in ideal circumstances, the performance of safe and effective endoscopic transsphenoidal pituitary surgery requires complicated orchestration of care amongst multiple medical and surgical teams in the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative settings. The current COVID-19 pandemic further complicates this highly orchestrated effort. Healthcare systems around the globe are working to adapt to the rapidly changing healthcare landscape as information about the SARS-CoV-2 virus is discovered and disseminated. The nature of the transsphenoidal corridor exposes the pituitary surgery team to increased risk of virus exposure.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Neurosurgeons , Pituitary Neoplasms/surgery , Pituitary Neoplasms/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Neuroendoscopy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , SARS-CoV-2
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