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1.
Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine ; 15(9):400-409, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2080621

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate long-term effects of COVID-19, and to determine the risk factors in long-COVID in a cohort of the Turkish Thoracic Society (TTS)-TURCOVID multicenter registry. Method(s): Thirteen centers participated with 831 patients;504 patients were enrolled after exclusions. The study was designed in three-steps: (1) Phone questionnaire;(2) retrospective evaluation of the medical records;(3) face-to-face visit. Result(s): In the first step, 93.5% of the patients were hospitalized;61.7% had a history of pneumonia at the time of diagnosis. A total of 27.1% reported clinical symptoms at the end of the first year. Dyspnea (17.00%), fatigue (6.30%), and weakness (5.00%) were the most prevalent long-term symptoms. The incidence of long-term symptoms was increased by 2.91 fold (95% CI 1.04-8.13, P=0.041) in the presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and by 1.84 fold (95% CI 1.10-3.10, P=0.021) in the presence of pneumonia at initial diagnosis, 3.92 fold (95% Cl 2.29-6.72, P=0.001) of dyspnea and 1.69 fold (95% Cl 1.02-2.80, P=0.040) fatigue persists in the early-post-treatment period and 2.88 fold (95% Cl 1.52-5.46, P=0.001) in the presence of emergency service admission in the post COVID period. In step 2, retrospective analysis of 231 patients revealed that 1.4% of the chest X-rays had not significantly improved at the end of the first year, while computed tomography (CT) scan detected fibrosis in 3.4%. In step 3, 138 (27.4%) patients admitted to face-to-face visit at the end of first year;at least one symptom persisted in 49.27% patients. The most common symptoms were dyspnea (27.60%), psychiatric symptoms (18.10%), and fatigue (17.40%). Thorax CT revealed fibrosis in 2.4% patients. Conclusion(s): COVID-19 symptoms can last for extended lengths of time, and severity of the disease as well as the presence of comorbidities might contribute to increased risk. Long-term clinical issues should be regularly evaluated after COVID-19. Copyright © 2022 Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine Produced by Wolters Kluwer Medknow.

2.
Antimicrobial Stewardship and Healthcare Epidemiology ; 2(1), 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1984307

ABSTRACT

In the above article1, the original title: "Evaluation of prevalance and risk factors for bloodstream infection in severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients": : : contained a spelling error. The title has since been corrected to read: "Evaluation of prevalence and risk factors for bloodstream infection in severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. © The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

4.
Gazi Medical Journal ; 32(4A):651-654, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1543001

ABSTRACT

Objective: COVID-19 (Coronavirus disease 2019) is a global pandemic that affected more than 125 million people all over the world. Vaccines will play a key role in the control of this pandemic. Although inactive vaccine technologies are reliable and being used for a long time, Coronavac is a newly developed vaccine and studies on the side effects of this vaccine are limited. The aims of this study is to evaluate the frequency of possible side effects of Coronovac vaccine and to investigate whether there is a difference between the 1st and 2nd dose vaccines in terms of the frequency of side effects. Methods: This single-center, retrospective descriptive study was carried out in health care workers (HCWs) of Gazi University Hospital who received 2 doses of Coronavac vaccine between January and March 2021. At least 14 days after 2 dose of vaccination, serious advers events, non-serious advers events and possible side effects are collected by the questionnaire forms prepared for the study by the researchers. All data were analyzed by IBM SPSS Statistics version 20.0 (IBM Corp., Armonk, N.Y., USA). The questionnaire forms, prepared for the study, were delivered to volunteer HCWs manually or online by the researchers at least 14 days after 2 dose of vaccination. The data obtained through the questionnaires were transferred to the computing environment and analyzed. Results: 1102 HCWs were enrolled in the study and 392 (35.6 %) had at least one adverse event after the 1st or 2 nd dose Coronavac vaccine. The most common adverse events were: Headache 230 (20.9%), fatigue 225 (20.4 %) and local reactions 193 (17.5%). Serious adverse events occurred in 3 (0.3 %) patients (1 Anaphylaxis,2 Angioedema) after vaccination. The majority of adverse events associated with Coronavac vaccine occured within the first 48 hours. The incidence of adverse events after vaccination is higher in healthcare workers with a known history of vaccine and non-vaccine allergies (42.7% vs. 34.3%, p<0.05, Chi-square test). More frequent side effects were observed after second doses in healthcare workers who developed side effects after the 1st dose of vaccine (70.5% vs. 5.3, p<0.01, Chi-square test) Conclusion: In our study, we found that short-term adverse events of Coronovac vaccine were found to be consistent with phase 1/2 studies and it was observed to be safe for clinical use. However, there is still a need for long-term follow-up in terms of monitoring side effects after administration for the safety of vaccine use.

5.
Mediterranean Journal of Infection, Microbes and Antimicrobials ; 10(28), 2021.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1365775

ABSTRACT

Introduction: This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels and clinical course and outcome of Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). Materials and Methods: In this single-center, prospective study, patients with COVID-19 were divided into three groups with uncomplicated disease, mild pneumonia, and severe pneumonia. Cases were compared in terms of clinical and laboratory findings as well as serum 25(OH)D levels on hospital admission. Patients were also grouped according to their COVID-19-related outcomes and then compared in terms of 25(OH)D levels.

6.
Mediterranean Journal of Infection, Microbes and Antimicrobials ; 10, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1344488

ABSTRACT

Introduction: This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels and clinical course and outcome of Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). Materials and Methods: In this single-center, prospective study, patients with COVID-19 were divided into three groups with uncomplicated disease, mild pneumonia, and severe pneumonia. Cases were compared in terms of clinical and laboratory findings as well as serum 25(OH)D levels on hospital admission. Patients were also grouped according to their COVID-19-related outcomes and then compared in terms of 25(OH)D levels. Results: The median serum 25(OH)D levels of the COVID-19 and control groups were 16 (11-23) ng/ml and 21.5 (18-25) ng/ml, respectively (p<0.001). No significant differences were found in the serum 25(OH)D levels between noncomplicated, mild pneumonia, and severe pneumonia groups 16.5 (16-25.2), 15 (11-21), and 16 (11.5-26.5) ng/ml, respectively, p=0.521. When compared in terms of COVID-19-related outcomes, no significant difference was found in vitamin D levels. Conclusion: Patients with vitamin D deficiency may have higher risk for COVID-19 infections. However, no relationship was found between serum vitamin D levels and clinical severity and outcomes of COVID-19.

7.
Gazi Medical Journal ; 32(2):213-218, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1257156

ABSTRACT

Objective: The aim of the study is to compare the differences between COVID-19 pneumonia and other viral pneumonia (OVP) in terms of demographic, clinical and radiological features. Methods: This retrospective cohort study was conducted in Gazi University Hospital between 11 March and 24 May 2020. Patients, admitted to the hospital with suspected COVID-19 infection aged >18 years and those who had pneumonia on chest computed tomography (CT) scan were evaluated. SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR and multiplex PCR, for other respiratory viruses, were performed. Patients with a positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR were included in "COVID-19 pneumonia" group and those who had a positive result for any other respiratory viruses and two consecutive negative results for SARS-CoV-2 were included in the "OVP" group. Two groups were compared in terms of clinical, laboratory and chest CT findings. Results: Of the 63 patients included in the study, 45 had COVID-19 pneumonia and 18 had OVP. Cough, nasal congestion, sputum production and leukocytosis were more common in the OVP group while leukopenia was more common in the COVID-19 pneumonia (p<0.05). The distribution pattern of parenchymal lesions on chest CT was more likely to be predominantly peripheral and posterior in COVID-19 pneumonia compared to OVP. Bilateral involvement was also more frequent in COVID-19 group compared to OVP (p<0.05). Conclusion: Distinguishing COVID-19 pneumonia from OVP with clinical and laboratory findings is difficult. Chest CT findings such as peripheral and posterior distribution of the parenchymal lesions and bilateral involvement may help to differentiate COVID-19 pneumonia from OVP.

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