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1.
Russian Journal of Cardiology ; JOUR:7-15, 27(9).
Article in Russian | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2091088

ABSTRACT

Aim. To assess the changes in cardiology diagnostics scope in the Russian Federation during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Material and methods. In an online survey organized by the Division of Human Health of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), including questions about changes in the workflow of diagnostic laboratories and the scope of cardiac diagnostics from March 2019 (pre-pandemic) to April 2020 (first wave of the pandemic) and April 2021 (recovery stage), 15 Russian medical centers from 5 cities took part. Results. The decrease in the diagnostics scope by April 2020 by 59,3% compared to March 2019, by April 2021, stopped and was replaced by growth (+7,1%, the recovery rate, 112,1%). The greatest increase was in routine examinations, such as echocardiography (+11,6%), stress echocardiography (+18,7%), stress single photon emission computed tomography (+9,7%), and to a lesser extent resting computed tomography angiography (+7,0%) and magnetic resonance imaging (+6,6%). The performance of stress electrocardiography, stress magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography for the diagnosis of endocarditis in April 2021 compared to March 2019 decreased by 10,3%, 63,2% and 62,5%, respectively. Conclusion. Due to the resumption of patient admissions for cardiac examinations during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, with the anti-epidemic measures taken and certain changes in the workflow, there has been a recovery in the diagnostics scope in most of the included centers. Copyright © 2022, Silicea-Poligraf. All rights reserved.

2.
Gastroenterology ; 162(7):S-592, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1967333

ABSTRACT

Background: Waning levels of anti-SARS-CoV-2 Spike (S) antibodies, particularly neutralizing, are associated with the risk of breakthrough infections. The impact of immunosuppression on antibody decay kinetics is unclear. We have previously reported a strong correlation between total anti-S antibodies and neutralization titers. Here, we report the decay kinetics in anti-S IgG antibodies across various immunosuppressive medications used in patients with CID. Methods: We recruited a volunteer sample of adults with confirmed CID eligible for SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in a prospective observational cohort study at two United States CID referral centers. All study participants received two doses of mRNA vaccine to SARSCoV- 2. To assess the durability of immunogenicity, anti-S IgG were measured at 7 (visit 3), 90 (visit 5), and 120 (visit 6) days after the 2nd dose of mRNA vaccine. The impact of various medications was assessed in repeated measures mixed model with the patient as a random effect, adjusting for gender and age, and using the group of patients on sulfasalazine, NSAIDs, or on no medications as a reference, using STATA. The half-life of anti-S IgG for a 50 percent reduction in titers at visit 3 was calculated for each medication class. Results: A total of 316 CID patients were recruited of which 148 (46.8%) had inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Durability was assessed in 495 samples obtained in 293 patients. The arithmetic mean of anti-S IgG antibodies for each medication class at visits 3, 5, and 6 is shown in Figure 1. Overall, a 2-fold reduction in titers was observed from 7 to 90 days and 90 to 120 days (Table 1). The strongest decline was observed among patients on B cell depleting/ modulating therapies followed by those on combinations of biologics and/or small molecules and antimetabolites (methotrexate, leflunomide, thiopurines, mycophenolate mofetil, and teriflunomide). There was modest decline seen with TNFi (half-life 430.5 days, -2.15, 95% CI - 4.31 to - 1.07, p = 0.03). There was also a modest, but not significant, decline seen with Janus Kinase inhibitor (JAKi). No decline was seen with anti-IL-23 or anti-integrin medication classes. Conclusions: Antibody decay in patients with CID is not observed in patients on anti-integrins or anti-IL-23 while it is seen among patients on TNFi, JAKi, antimetabolites, and combinations of biologics and/or small molecules. Our data and those from other cohorts may be used to prioritize medication classes for boosting immunogenicity with additional doses of vaccination against SARS-CoV-2. Collection of antibody titers after booster doses is currently ongoing.(Table Presented) (Figure Presented) Figure 1: Durability of anti-spike IgG antibodies after vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 in patients with Chronic Inflammatory Disease

3.
PSICOLOGIA ; 35(2):95-108, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1847886

ABSTRACT

Our study examined the psychometric properties and factor structure of an instrument to assess emotional climate during the COVID-19 pandemic using a sample of 601 Portuguese individuals. Two sub-samples were created, one to perform an exploratory factor analysis (EFA), composed of 300 participants, and the other to conduct a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), composed of 301 individuals. Two factors were found: positive and negative emotional climate. In the EFA, both factors established a negative and significant correlation. However, the CFA presented a better fit with two independent factors. Reliability analysis indicated acceptable values for both dimensions. There was also evidence of discriminant, convergent, and criterion validity. More negative emotions were perceived regarding the social climate. Results were discussed in the frame of different positive and negative psychosocial variables related to positive and negative emotional climates, as well as positive emotional climate as a resource for collective resilience. © 2021 Associacao Portuguesa de Psicologia. All rights reserved.

4.
PubMed; 2021.
Preprint in English | PubMed | ID: ppcovidwho-333771

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Individuals with chronic inflammatory diseases (CID) are frequently treated with immunosuppressive medications that can increase their risk of severe COVID-19. While novel mRNA-based SARS-CoV-2 vaccination platforms provide robust protection in immunocompetent individuals, the immunogenicity in CID patients on immunosuppression is not well established. Therefore, determining the effectiveness of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in the setting of immunosuppression is essential to risk-stratify CID patients with impaired protection and provide clinical guidance regarding medication management. METHODS: We conducted a prospective assessment of mRNA-based vaccine immunogenicity in 133 adults with CIDs and 53 immunocompetent controls. Blood from participants over 18 years of age was collected before initial immunization and 1-2 weeks after the second immunization. Serum anti-SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) IgG + binding, neutralizing antibody titers, and circulating S-specific plasmablasts were quantified to assess the magnitude and quality of the humoral response following vaccination. RESULTS: Compared to immunocompetent controls, a three-fold reduction in anti-S IgG titers (P=0.009) and SARS-CoV-2 neutralization (p<0.0001) were observed in CID patients. B cell depletion and glucocorticoids exerted the strongest effect with a 36- and 10-fold reduction in humoral responses, respectively (p<0.0001). Janus kinase inhibitors and antimetabolites, including methotrexate, also blunted antibody titers in multivariate regression analysis (P<0.0001, P=0.0023, respectively). Other targeted therapies, such as TNF inhibitors, IL-12/23 inhibitors, and integrin inhibitors, had only modest impacts on antibody formation and neutralization. CONCLUSIONS: CID patients treated with immunosuppressive therapies exhibit impaired SARS-CoV-2 vaccine-induced immunity, with glucocorticoids and B cell depletion therapy more severely impeding optimal responses.

5.
Revista Mexicana de Urologia ; 81(5), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1737622

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemics has caused millions of deaths worldwide, has increased the demand for in-hospital beds and has affected in-hospital activities of "non-respiratory patients." There is currently no known effect of the pandemic on the emergency urological care in our region. This study aims to estimate the first - wave COVID-19 pandemics effect on emergency urological care in four tertiary Colombian hospitals. Material and methods: A cross-sectional retrospective multicenter study were made. The emergency urological care activities between April - May 2019 and April - May 2020 were compared. We calculated descriptive statistics and assessed differences during the study periods. We used Stata 13.0. Results: 1570 patients were included. There was a 22.20% decrease in the number of patients who visited the emergency room (ER) for urological disease during the pandemic's initial phase. Urolithiasis and urological infectious were the most common reasons for consulting in the ER. The surgical index for patients who required emergency urological care had a increase of 10.74% (p: 0.0001). There was a decrease of 0.74 days in hospital stay for patients who required urological emergency care in the initial COVID-19 pandemic period. Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on emergency and elective urological care worldwide. During the initial phase of this emergency, there was a significant decreased in hospital admission and average hospital stays due to urological emergencies in Colombia, however, the surgical index for critical urological diseases increased by 10.74%. According to the pandemićs dynamics, a greater effect on urological care is expected..

9.
Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging ; 47(9): 2220, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1640818

ABSTRACT

The authors P. Orellana and N. El-Haj were inadvertently deleted in the original paper.

10.
European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging ; 48(SUPPL 1):S151-S151, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1609988
11.
PUBMED; 2021.
Preprint in English | PUBMED | ID: ppcovidwho-292899

ABSTRACT

Background: Individuals with chronic inflammatory diseases (CID) are frequently treated with immunosuppressive medications that can increase their risk of severe COVID-19. While novel mRNA-based SARS-CoV-2 vaccination platforms provide robust protection in immunocompetent individuals, the immunogenicity in CID patients on immunosuppression is not well established. Therefore, determining the effectiveness of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in the setting of immunosuppression is essential to risk-stratify CID patients with impaired protection and provide clinical guidance regarding medication management. Methods: We conducted a prospective assessment of mRNA-based vaccine immunogenicity in 133 adults with CIDs and 53 immunocompetent controls. Blood from participants over 18 years of age was collected before initial immunization and 1-2 weeks after the second immunization. Serum anti-SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) IgG + binding, neutralizing antibody titers, and circulating S-specific plasmablasts were quantified to assess the magnitude and quality of the humoral response following vaccination. Results: Compared to immunocompetent controls, a three-fold reduction in anti-S IgG titers (P=0.009) and SARS-CoV-2 neutralization (p<0.0001) were observed in CID patients. B cell depletion and glucocorticoids exerted the strongest effect with a 36- and 10-fold reduction in humoral responses, respectively (p<0.0001). Janus kinase inhibitors and antimetabolites, including methotrexate, also blunted antibody titers in multivariate regression analysis (P<0.0001, P=0.0023, respectively). Other targeted therapies, such as TNF inhibitors, IL-12/23 inhibitors, and integrin inhibitors, had only modest impacts on antibody formation and neutralization. Conclusions: CID patients treated with immunosuppressive therapies exhibit impaired SARS-CoV-2 vaccine-induced immunity, with glucocorticoids and B cell depletion therapy more severely impeding optimal responses.

12.
Russian Journal of Cardiology ; 26(1):105-118, 2021.
Article in Russian | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1485573

ABSTRACT

Aim. To assess the impact of the first wave of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on the diagnosis of heart disease in the Russian Federation. Material and methods. Fifteen Russian medical centers from 5 cities took part in an online survey organized by the Division of Human Health of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), containing questions regarding alterations in cardiovascular procedure volumes resulting from COVID-19 in March-April 2020. Results. A number of outpatients undergoing cardiac diagnostic procedures was noted in 80% of clinics. Cardiovascular procedure volumes in the period from March 2019 to March 2020 in general decreased by 9,5%, and from March 2019 to April 2020, by 56,5%. Stress electrocardiography decreased by 38,4%, stress echocardiography by 72,5%, stress single-photon emission computed tomography by 66,9%, computed tomography angiography by 49,7%, magnetic resonance imaging by 42,7%, invasive coronary angiography by 40,7%. The decrease in diagnostic procedure volumes in selected regions (Tomsk Oblast, Kemerovo Oblast, Tatarstan) was not so pronounced compared to Moscow and St. Petersburg (-20,7%,-75,2%,-93,8% in April 2020, respectively, p<0,001). Conclusion. The first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic caused a sharp decrease in the number of diagnostic cardiac procedures in Russia. This has potential long-term implications for patients with cardiovascular disease. Understanding these implications can help guide diagnostic strategies during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and minimize the future losses.

13.
Annals of Oncology ; 32:S1245-S1246, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1432833

ABSTRACT

Background: Knowledge of the career paths and employment situation of young medical oncologists is lacking. The aim of our study was to evaluate the current professional standing of young medical oncologists during COVID-19 pandemic in Spain. Methods: The SEOM +MIR section conducted a national online survey in May 2021 of young medical oncology consultants (<6 years of expertise) and last year medical oncology residents. Using the electronic mailing available in the SEOM database, professionals from Spain were invited. Results: A total of 136 responses were eligible in the preliminary analysis. 86 (63%) were women. 106 (78%) were consultants and 30 (22%) were residents. 92 (68%) performed standard clinical care and 10 (7%) research activity. 97 (71%) were subspecialized in a main area of interest and almost half of them, 60 (48%), chose it because it was the only option available after residency. 75 (55%) had considered different employment opportunities other than standard clinical care and 33 (25%) showed an interest in increasing their research activity. 68 (50%) had considered working in foreign countries: 40 (29%) in the European Union. The main reasons were: 35 (26%) thought it might increase their professional development and 29 (22%) argued for better salary conditions abroad. Furthermore, 109 (80%) believed the professional standing in Spain was worse than other countries. After finishing their residency, only 20 (14%) were offered a job at their training hospital. Solely, 17 (12%) participants had an indefinite employment contract. 25 (18%) had previously signed a COVID-19 temporary contract. 55 (40%) were worried about their employment stability. Conclusions: The availability of subspecializing in medical oncology may depend on the job opportunity after residency rather than personal interest. The abundance of temporary contracts could have influenced the employment stability concerns observed. Our work contributes and is consistent with the ESMO values focused on the wellbeing of medical oncology professionals. Future mentoring strategies should engage in building a long-term career path for young medical oncologists. Legal entity responsible for the study: SEOM +MIR Section. Funding: Has not received any funding. Disclosure: V. Pacheco-Barcia: Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker, Speaker Fee: Eisai;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker, Speaker Fee: Merck;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker, Speaker Fee: Bristol Myers Squibb;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker, Speaker Fee: LEO Pharma;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker, Speaker Fee: Kyowa Kirin;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker, Speaker Fee: Grunenthal;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker, Speaker FEE: Prostakan;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker, Speaker Fee: Lilly;Other, Other: Merck. D.A. Sanchez: Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Janssen;Non-Financial Interests, Personal and Institutional, Leadership Role, National Representative of Young Doctors of Promotion of Employment in Organización Médica Colegial: Spanish Medical Association;Non-Financial Interests, Personal and Institutional, Leadership Role: President of the Murcian Health Service Company Committee;Non-Financial Interests, Personal and Institutional, Leadership Role: Vice-representative from the European Junior Doctors (EJD) in Oncology Section in UEMS (Uropean Union of Medical Specialties);Non-Financial Interests, Personal, Other: Member of +MIR Section of the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology;Non-Financial Interests, Personal, Other: ESMO member;Non-Financial Interests, Personal, Other: SEOM member. B. Obispo: Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Lilly;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Novartis;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Sanofi;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Fresenius;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Angelini Pharma;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Rovi;Financial Interes s, Personal, Invited Speaker: Leo Pharma. A. Quilez: Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Roche;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Clovis;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Bristol Myers Squibb;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: GSK;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: GSK. A. Sesma: Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: MSD. D. Paez: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Amgen;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Amgen;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: F. Hoffman-La Roche Ltd;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Sanofi;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Ipsen;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Advanced Accelerator Applications;Financial Interests, Personal, Research Grant, Research funding: Merck Serono. T. Quintanar Verduguez: Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Novartis;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Novartis;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Abbott;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Nestle;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Lilly;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Roche;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Consultancy: Astra Zeneca. M. Sánchez Cánovas: Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Leo Pharma;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Angelini Pharma;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: KyowaKirin;Financial Interests, Institutional, Other: Leo Pharma;Other, Personal, Other, Attending Symposia: Sanofi;Other, Personal, Other, Attending Symposia: MSD;Other, Personal, Other, Attending Symposia: Esteve;Other, Personal, Other, Attending Symposia: Amgen;Other, Personal, Other, Attending Symposia: Servier;Other, Personal, Other, Attending Symposia: Angelini;Other, Personal, Other, Attending Symposia: Leo Pharma;Other, Personal, Other, Educational Programs: Angelini;Other, Personal, Other, Educational Programs: Sanofi;Other, Personal, Other, Educational Programs: Rovi;Other, Personal, Other, Educational Programs: Leo Pharma;Other, Personal, Other, Educational Programs: Servier;Other, Personal, Other, Educational Programs: Merck;Other, Personal, Other, Remunerations for authorship: KyowaKirin;Other, Personal, Other, Remunerations for authorship: Mylan. N. Tarazona: Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Amgen;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Servier;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Pfizer;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Merck;Financial Interests, Institutional, Principal Investigator, Principal Investigator: Mutua Madrileña;Financial Interests, Institutional, Principal Investigator: SEOM;Financial Interests, Institutional, Principal Investigator: TTD Group;Non-Financial Interests, Personal, Leadership Role, Member of CIBERONC Liquid Biopsy Working Module since 2018: CIBERONC;Non-Financial Interests, Personal, Leadership Role, Member of ESMO Translational Research and Precision Medicine Working Group for the period 2019-2020.: ESMO;Non-Financial Interests, Personal, Leadership Role, Member of ESMO-MCBS Extended Working Group since 2019: ESMO;Non-Financial Interests, Personal, Leadership Role, Member of ESMO faculty member for the Gastro-Intestinal Tumours faculty group for the period 2019-2023.: ESMO Faculty;Non-Financial Interests, Personal, Leadership Role, Member of Executive Committee SEOM +MIR 2020-2022.: SEOM +MIR. A. Fernandez Montes: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Bristol Myers Squibb;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: MSD;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: MSD;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Servier;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Lilly;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Lilly;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Astra Zeneca;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Pierre Fabre;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Merck. E. Felip: Financial Interest , Personal, Advisory Board: Amgen;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: AstraZeneca;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Bayer;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Beigene;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Boehringer-Ingelheim;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Bristol Myers Squibb;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Eli Lilly;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: F Hoffman-La Roche;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Glaxo Smith Kline;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Janssen;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Medical Trends;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Merck Sharp & Dohme;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Merck Serono;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Peptomyc;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Pfizer;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Puma;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Regeneron;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Sanofi;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Syneos Health;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Takeda;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Amgen;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: AstraZeneca;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Bristol Myers Squibb;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Eli Lilly;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: F Hoffman-La Roche;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Janssen;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Medscape;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Merck Sharp & Dohme;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Merck Serono;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Peervoice;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau:Pfizer;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Springer;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Touch MEdical;Other, Personal, Other, Independent member of the board: GRIFOLS. A. Rodríguez-Lescure: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Roche;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Pfizer;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Novartis;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Lilly;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: MSD;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Astra Zeneca;Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: Roche;Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: Novartis;Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: Pfizer;Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: Lilly;Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: Astra Zeneca;Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: Amgen;Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: MSD;Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: Bristol-Myers Squibb;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Roche;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Pfizer;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Novartis;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Lilly;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: AstraZeneca;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: MSD;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Merck;Other, Personal, Other, Travel, accommodations: Roche;Other, Personal, Other, Travel, accomodations: Pfizer. M.E. Elez Fernandez: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Amgen;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Array Biopharma;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Bayer;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Bristol Myers Squibb;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Hoffman La- Roche;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Merck serono;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Sanofi;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Servier;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: Abbvie;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: Amgen;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: Array Pharmaceuticals;Financial Interests, Institution l, Research Grant: AstraZeneca;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: Boehringer Ingelheim;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: Bristol-Myers Squibb;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: GlaxoSmithKline;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: Hoffman La-Roche;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: Medimmune;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: Merck Serono;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: MSD;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: Novartis;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: Pierre-Fabre;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: Sanofi Aventis. All other authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

14.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases ; 80(SUPPL 1):911, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1358872

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with autoimmune disease often require immunosuppressive medications that may increase their risk of developing severe illness from COVID-19. The importance of immunization in this population is particularly high. While the studied vaccines show efficacy in the general population, nothing is known regarding the immune response or safety profile in patients with autoimmune disease and those taking immunomodulatory medications. Objectives: To assess the safety profile and degree of adverse events from SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in patients with autoimmune and inflammatory disease. Methods: This study is part of a larger prospective observational study examining the immunogenicity and safety profile of the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in patients with immune-mediated diseases taking immunomodulatory medications. Adults with an immune-mediated disease scheduled to receive either a Pfizer or Moderna SARS-COV-2 vaccine were enrolled in this study. Subjects participated in 3 study visits (pre-vaccine, dose 1 (D1) and dose 2 (D2)) where blood, for immunologic assays, and clinical data were collected. Assessments of adverse events (AE), including local and systemic symptoms and validated degree of AE severity were solicited within 7 days of receiving each vaccine dose. Results: To date, 70 patients with autoimmune and inflammatory disease have been enrolled. Demographic and clinical characteristics are shown in Table 1. Distribution of current immunomodulatory medications included prednisone 18.6%, conventional synthetic DMARD 55.7%, targeted synthetic DMARD 4.3%, and biologic DMARD 68.5%. Almost all participants experienced an adverse event following vaccination (D1 96%, D2 100%). Following D1 AEs were generally mild (76.5%) whereas following D2 a large portion of patients experienced AEs that were moderate (47.8%) and severe (30.5%). Injection site pain was the most common AE following both doses followed by arthralgias (D1 21.6%, D2 78.2%), fever (D1 21.6%, D2 70%) and fatigue (D1 21.6%, D2 65.2%) (Figure 1). Conclusion: Patients with autoimmune and inflammatory disease experience a significant burden of adverse events following SARS-CoV-2 vaccination with both frequency and severity appearing greater than that of the reported results from the vaccine clinical trials. Several of the endorsed AEs such as fever, fatigue and arthralgias can also be commonly seen in rheumatologic diseases, mimicking flares. While SARS-CoV-2 immunization is crucial in patients with autoimmune diseases, this study demonstrates the importance of understanding the AEs experienced by this patient population to better inform patients of possible expected side effects of SARS-CoV-2 vaccination and further management in the future.

15.
ESMO Open ; 6(4): 100215, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1330817

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Young oncologists are at particular risk of professional burnout, and this could have a significant impact on their health and care of their patients. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has forced rapid changes in professionals' jobs and training, with the consequent physical and psychological effects. We aimed to characterize burnout levels and determinants in young oncologists, and the effects of the pandemic on their training and health. METHODS: Two online surveys were conducted among oncology residents and young oncology specialists in Spain. The first addressed professional burnout and its determinants before the COVID-19 pandemic, while the second analyzed the impact of the pandemic on health care organization, training, and physical and psychological health in the same population. RESULTS: In total, 243 respondents completed the first survey, and 263 the second; 25.1% reported significant levels of professional burnout. Burnout was more common among medical oncology residents (28.2%), mainly in their second year of training. It was significantly associated with a poor work-life balance, inadequate vacation time, and the burnout score. Nearly three-quarters of respondents (72%) were reassigned to COVID-19 care and 84.3% of residents missed part of their training rotations. Overall, 17.2% of this population reported that they had contracted COVID-19, 37.3% had scores indicating anxiety, and 30.4% moderate to severe depression. Almost a quarter of young oncologists (23.3%) had doubts about their medical vocation. CONCLUSIONS: Burnout affects a considerable number of young oncologists. The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on causes of burnout, making it even more necessary to periodically monitor it to define appropriate detection and prevention strategies.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Oncologists , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological/prevention & control , Humans , Medical Oncology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
17.
International Journal of Environmental Research & Public Health [Electronic Resource] ; 18(9):27, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1210064

ABSTRACT

A door-to-door survey was organised in Cuenca, Ecuador, to determine the prevalence of COVID-19 infection and adherence of the population to COVID-19 preventive measures. A total of 2457 persons participated in the study;584 (23.7%) reported having experienced at least one flu-like symptom since the onset of the pandemic. The maximum SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence in Cuenca was 13.2% (CI: 12-14.6%) (IgM or IgG positive). Considering PCR confirmed infections, the prevalence was 11% (CI: 10-12.4%). There was no significant difference in seroprevalence between rural and urban areas. Participants aged 35-49 years old, living with a COVID-19 positive person, at least six people in a household, physical contact with someone outside the household, a contact with a person outside the home with flu-like symptoms, using public transport, and not having enough resources for living, significantly increased the odds for SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity. Overall, there was good adherence to COVID-19 preventive measures. Having known someone who tested positive for COVID-19, having a primary or secondary level of education, and having enough resources for living, significantly increased the odds for higher adherence. In conclusion, despite good overall adherence of the population of Cuenca with COVID-19 preventive measures, our study suggests high ongoing COVID-19 transmission in Cuenca, particularly in certain parishes. Prevention should not only focus on behavioural change, but on intensified testing strategies in demographical risk groups.

18.
Papers on Social Representations ; 29(2):24, 2020.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1058804
19.
Urologia Colombiana ; 29(3):168-173, 2020.
Article in Spanish | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-834952

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV 2 outbreak is one of the most important events of public health around the world;this disease has affected millions of people, has killed over 430.000 people and has increased the needed of intensive care unit beds around the world. During the pandemic the world has seen a decline in the organ donation and transplantation activities, Colombian transplant model has been affected too. This paper wants to show the current situation of organ donation and transplantation during SARS-CoV 2 pandemic and explore some dilemmas around organ donation and transplantation for emerging countries.

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