Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 11 de 11
Filter
2.
Marchesi, Francesco, Salmanton-Garcia, Jon, Emarah, Ziad, Piukovics, Klára, Nucci, Marcio, Lopez-Garcia, Alberto, Racil, Zdenek, Farina, Francesca, Popova, Marina, Zompi, Sofia, Audisio, Ernesta, Ledoux, Marie-Pierre, Verga, Luisa, Weinbergerova, Barbora, Szotkowski, Tomas, Silva, Maria, Fracchiolla, Nicola Stefano, De Jonge, Nick, Collins, Graham, Marchetti, Monia, Magliano, Gabriele, GarcÍA-Vidal, Carolina, Biernat, Monika, Doesum, Jaap van, Machado, Marina, Demirkan, Fatih, Khabori, Murtadha Al, Zak, Pavel, Visek, Benjamin, Stoma, Igor, MÉNdez, Gustavo-Adolfo, Maertens, Johan, Khanna, Nina, Espigado, Ildefonso, Dragonetti, Giulia, Fianchi, Luana, Principe, Maria Ilaria Del, Cabirta, Alba, Ormazabal-VÉLez, Irati, Jaksic, Ozren, Buquicchio, Caterina, Bonuomo, Valentina, Batinić, Josip, Omrani, Ali, Lamure, Sylvain, Finizio, Olimpia, FernÁNdez, Noemí, Falces-Romero, Iker, Blennow, Ola, Bergantim, Rui, Ali, Natasha, Win, Sein, Praet, Jens V. A. N.; Tisi, Maria Chiara, Shirinova, Ayten, SchÖNlein, Martin, Prattes, Juergen, Piedimonte, Monica, Petzer, Verena, NavrÁTil, Milan, Kulasekararaj, Austin, Jindra, Pavel, Jiří, Glenthøj, Andreas, Fazzi, Rita, de Ramón, Cristina, Cattaneo, Chiara, Calbacho, Maria, Bahr, Nathan, El-Ashwl, Shaimaa Saber, Córdoba, Raúl, Hanakova, Michaela, Zambrotta, Giovanni, Sciumè, Mariarita, Booth, Stephen, Nunes-Rodrigues, Raquel, Sacchi, Maria Vittoria, GarcÍA-PoutÓN, Nicole, MartÍN-GonzÁLez, Juan-Alberto, Khostelidi, Sofya, GrÄFe, Stefanie, Rahimli, Laman, busca, alessandro, Corradini, Paolo, Hoenigl, Martin, Klimko, Nikolai, Koehler, Philipp, Pagliuca, Antonio, Passamonti, Francesco, Cornely, Oliver, pagano, Livio.
EuropePMC;
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-328805

ABSTRACT

Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are at high risk of mortality from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The optimal management of AML patients with COVID-19 has not been established. Our multicenter study included 388 adult AML patients with COVID-19 diagnosis between February 2020 and October 2021. The vast majority were receiving or had received AML treatment in the prior 3 months. COVID-19 was severe in 41.2% and critical in 21.1% of cases. The chemotherapeutic schedule was modified in 174 patients (44.8%), delayed in 68 and permanently discontinued in 106. After a median follow-up of 325 days, 180 patients (46.4%) had died. Death was attributed to COVID-19 (43.3%), AML (26.1%) or to a combination of both (26.7%). Active disease, older age, and treatment discontinuation were associated with death, whereas AML treatment delay was protective. Seventy-nine patients had a simultaneous AML and COVID-19 diagnosis, with an improved survival when AML treatment could be delayed. Patients with COVID-19 diagnosis between January and August 2020 had a significantly lower survival. COVID-19 in AML patients was associated with a high mortality rate and modifications of therapeutic algorithms. The best approach to improve survival was to delay AML treatment.

6.
J Hematol Oncol ; 14(1): 168, 2021 10 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468074

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with hematological malignancies (HM) are at high risk of mortality from SARS-CoV-2 disease 2019 (COVID-19). A better understanding of risk factors for adverse outcomes may improve clinical management in these patients. We therefore studied baseline characteristics of HM patients developing COVID-19 and analyzed predictors of mortality. METHODS: The survey was supported by the Scientific Working Group Infection in Hematology of the European Hematology Association (EHA). Eligible for the analysis were adult patients with HM and laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 observed between March and December 2020. RESULTS: The study sample includes 3801 cases, represented by lymphoproliferative (mainly non-Hodgkin lymphoma n = 1084, myeloma n = 684 and chronic lymphoid leukemia n = 474) and myeloproliferative malignancies (mainly acute myeloid leukemia n = 497 and myelodysplastic syndromes n = 279). Severe/critical COVID-19 was observed in 63.8% of patients (n = 2425). Overall, 2778 (73.1%) of the patients were hospitalized, 689 (18.1%) of whom were admitted to intensive care units (ICUs). Overall, 1185 patients (31.2%) died. The primary cause of death was COVID-19 in 688 patients (58.1%), HM in 173 patients (14.6%), and a combination of both COVID-19 and progressing HM in 155 patients (13.1%). Highest mortality was observed in acute myeloid leukemia (199/497, 40%) and myelodysplastic syndromes (118/279, 42.3%). The mortality rate significantly decreased between the first COVID-19 wave (March-May 2020) and the second wave (October-December 2020) (581/1427, 40.7% vs. 439/1773, 24.8%, p value < 0.0001). In the multivariable analysis, age, active malignancy, chronic cardiac disease, liver disease, renal impairment, smoking history, and ICU stay correlated with mortality. Acute myeloid leukemia was a higher mortality risk than lymphoproliferative diseases. CONCLUSIONS: This survey confirms that COVID-19 patients with HM are at high risk of lethal complications. However, improved COVID-19 prevention has reduced mortality despite an increase in the number of reported cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hematologic Neoplasms/complications , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Hematologic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Hematologic Neoplasms/therapy , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Registries , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Young Adult
7.
Br J Cancer ; 125(7): 939-947, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360191

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Using an updated dataset with more patients and extended follow-up, we further established cancer patient characteristics associated with COVID-19 death. METHODS: Data on all cancer patients with a positive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction swab for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) at Guy's Cancer Centre and King's College Hospital between 29 February and 31 July 2020 was used. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to identify which factors were associated with COVID-19 mortality. RESULTS: Three hundred and six SARS-CoV-2-positive cancer patients were included. Seventy-one had mild/moderate and 29% had severe COVID-19. Seventy-two patients died of COVID-19 (24%), of whom 35 died <7 days. Male sex [hazard ratio (HR): 1.97 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.15-3.38)], Asian ethnicity [3.42 (1. 59-7.35)], haematological cancer [2.03 (1.16-3.56)] and a cancer diagnosis for >2-5 years [2.81 (1.41-5.59)] or ≥5 years were associated with an increased mortality. Age >60 years and raised C-reactive protein (CRP) were also associated with COVID-19 death. Haematological cancer, a longer-established cancer diagnosis, dyspnoea at diagnosis and raised CRP were indicative of early COVID-19-related death in cancer patients (<7 days from diagnosis). CONCLUSIONS: Findings further substantiate evidence for increased risk of COVID-19 mortality for male and Asian cancer patients, and those with haematological malignancies or a cancer diagnosis >2 years. These factors should be accounted for when making clinical decisions for cancer patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hematologic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Hematologic Neoplasms/complications , Hematologic Neoplasms/pathology , Hematologic Neoplasms/virology , Hospitals , Humans , London/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/pathology , Neoplasms/virology , Risk Factors
8.
Blood ; 136(Supplement 1):6-8, 2020.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-1339051

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a heterogeneous clinical condition caused by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The initial stage of infection occurs at the time of respiratory viral invasion through angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors in alveolar pneumocytes and macrophages. In the second stage of established pulmonary disease without and with hypoxia, viral multiplication and localized inflammation occurs. The third stage COVID-19 is the most severe, characterized by systemic hyperinflammation, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and generalized microangiopathy, with significantly elevated biomarkers including IL-2, IL-6, IL-7, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α, tumor necrosis factor-α, C-reactive protein, ferritin, D-dimer, von Willebrand factor (vWF) and thrombomodulin (TM). Evidence suggests that endothelial damage and activation play a key role in the pathobiology of the disease, and thus protecting endothelium and reversing endotheliitis may be a key therapeutic goal (Teuwen et al,Nat Rev Immunol2020).Defibrotide (DF), a complex mixture of poly-deoxyribonucleotides extracted from porcine mucosa, modulates expression of thrombogenic and inflammatory mediators produced in response to endothelial cell injury and/or leukocyte activation. DF increases tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and TM expression, thereby enhancing the enzymatic activity of plasmin to hydrolyze fibrin clot, while also decreasing vWF and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Platelet adhesion is inhibited via increases in nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin I2 (PGI2), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) (Falanga A et al,Leukemia 2003). Anti-inflammatory properties via inhibition of p38 MAPK pathway have been demonstrated with DF, attenuating the release of inflammatory mediators including IL-6, thromboxane A2, leukotriene B4, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and reactive oxygen species (Mitsiades et al,Clin Cancer Res2009). Additionally, DF inhibits both the expression and activity of heparanase, which in turn modulates heparan sulfate, a vital moiety for viral infection (Richardson et al,Blood Adv2018;Koganti et al,Cell Mol Life Sci2020).DF also modulates endothelial cell injury in murine models by down-regulating the expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules such as E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), that are critical to leukocyte adhesion and migration, and by increasing the endothelial cell release of anti-inflammatory cytokines, conferring survival benefit (Garcia-Bernal et al,J Cell Mol Med2020). DF is approved for the treatment of severe veno-occlusive disease/sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (VOD/SOS) complicating stem cell transplantation and has demonstrated efficacy and safety in critically ill patients with multi-organ failure, underpinned by vasculopathy, endotheliitis, immune activation and hemorrhagic risk (Richardson et al,Blood2016). This multi-target and pleiotropic approach makes DF an attractive candidate for the treatment of advanced stage COVID 19 and the systemic endothelial complications underpinning both its pathobiology and ensuing mortality (Figure 1).Various clinical studies in Spain, Italy, Ireland, the UK and USA are underway, with the larger randomized placebo-controlled prospective phase 2 study in Spain (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT04348383) leading in accrual with promising early results, demonstrating safety to date with potential efficacy, as reflected by favorable outcome in a subset of intubated patients as part of an ongoing multi-center trial. Other studies within the group have focused on safety and particularly the therapeutic role of DF in advanced disease, including those patients requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and full dose systemic anticoagulation. These trials include common in-depth biological correlatives, assessing biomarkers including heparanase, inflammatory cytokines, immune cell sub-populations, vWF a d soluble TM, as well as other novel markers and pharmacokinetics. In aggregate, these studies will hopefully help demonstrate the effects of DF on the proposed targets in COVID-19 and successfully correlate these effects with improved clinical outcome.

10.
Br J Haematol ; 193(1): 43-51, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066629
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL