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1.
Journal of International Agricultural and Extension Education ; 29(1):76-85, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2100059

ABSTRACT

Virtual reality is a technology that is on the leading edge of agricultural sciences dissemination. Virtual reality can be beneficial to improving global food security and better understanding climate impacts, due to its capabilities to reach mass media with critical information. Virtual reality, with the proper access, can connect users from all backgrounds to an immersive experience at their will. The impact of virtual reality as a dissemination tool in agriculture studies is relatively unknown in the literature. Therefore, the researchers chose to implement a mixed-methods research study to investigate the outcomes of student learning in a virtual reality course within the Texas A&M University Equine selection and judging team. Twelve students were purposively sampled within this study, with students taking the course in both 2020 and 2021. Findings from this study suggested that virtual reality could help students reach their desired learning outcomes. Students were also able to provide necessary information on improvements for the course, as it could possibly be a future barrier for student use if headsets are uncomfortable. Another finding of this research is that it further proved virtual reality technologies can be resourceful for disseminating agriculture education. Future studies should look to investigate virtual reality technologies and agriculture education on a wider array, as the results generated from this study are only applicable to the sample.

2.
International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research ; 21(7):1-23, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2026391

ABSTRACT

The aim of this paper was to gain deeper insight into Bachelor of Education Honors (B.Ed. Hons) students’ self-leadership actions in response to the social impact of COVID-19 on their academic lives. Notwithstanding the growing body of literature showing the impact of COVID-19 on education, the social influence of the pandemic on the academic lives of students in higher education institutions (HEIs) remains contentious. Since the implementation of lockdowns and social isolation internationally, COVID-19, as a social phenomenon, has required creative responses from students in HEIs to advance academically. Through a phenomenon-based learning (PhenoBL) enquiry and applying narrative methodology, students’ responses were analyzed by means of McCormack’s (2000) four lenses, namely the lens of language, the lens of narrative processed, the lens of context and the lens of moments. Emails were sent to all B.Ed. Hons students to express their views and understanding of the influence of COVID-19 on their academic lives as postgraduate students. Five students responded and were afforded the opportunity to provide their insights and understanding of the phenomenon whilst exploring self-leadership actions for change toward transformative practices in their learning spaces. The results revealed that, through engaging in PhenoBL activities, students were able to employ adaptive practices and inquiry-based activities to enhance self-leadership abilities through self-influence and self-trust. The paper recommends that HEIs should consider PhenoBL activities for self-leadership as transformative practices of social justice to address the social complexities of the COVID-19 pandemic and its influence on the academic lives of university students. ©Authors This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0).

3.
Blood ; 138:1750, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1582231

ABSTRACT

Background:COVID-19 adversely affects individuals with cancer. Several studies have found that seroconversion rates among patients with hematologic malignancies are suboptimal when compared to patients without cancer. Among patients with hematologic malignancies, seroconversion rates also appear to be influenced by recent treatment and the type of treatment they have received. Patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and multiple myeloma (MM) are immunocompromised due to impaired humoral and cellular immunity in addition to prescribed immunosuppressive therapy. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell (CAR T) therapy is now widely used for NHL and MM, but little is known about seroconversion rates after COVID-19 vaccination among these populations. Current national guidelines recommend COVID-19 vaccination to be offered to CAR T recipients as early as three months thereafter. We retrospectively evaluated SARS-CoV-2 spike-binding IgG antibody levels following COVID-19 vaccination among NHL and MM CAR T therapy recipients. Methods:This retrospective study was conducted at three Mayo Clinic sites on NHL and MM patients that received CAR T infusions from Sept 2016 to June 2021. Baseline characteristics were ascertained from medical records. All NHL and MM patients who had received CAR T at any point and were alive at the time that the COVID-19 vaccine first became available were eligible for inclusion for antibody response evaluation. For antibody response to vaccination, antibody spike values > 0.80 U/mL were considered positive. Results: Out of 104 CAR T infusions, 73 patients are alive at the time of this submission. We have had 7 patients with known COVID-19 pre-CAR T and all 7 are currently alive (5 have antibody titers and 2 have not been tested yet). Nineteen patients developed known COVID infection post-CAR T (13 alive and 6 deceased). The mortality of COVID post-CAR T in our sample was 31.5%. Furthermore, of the 13 patients that survived COVID-19, they received CAR T an average of 416 days prior to COVID-19 infection (median = 337, range = 54 - 1406);the 6 patients who died from COVID-19 had received CAR T an average of 250 days prior to COVID-19 infection (median = 164, range = 7 - 846). All 6 deceased patients did not receive COVID-19 vaccination pre-CAR T. Out of 17 CAR T patients tested for antibody spike titers post COVID-19 vaccination, 76.4% were able to mount an antibody response. More patients with MM had a higher titer response to the vaccine (>250 U/mL) compared to the NHL counterparts (0.80-249 U/mL). All patients that received the vaccine, regardless of antibody response, were alive at the time of this submission. Conclusions:The majority of CAR T recipients with NHL and MM are able to mount an antibody response following COVID-19 vaccination in our relatively small sample. The frequency of seroconversion among CAR T recipients seems to be similar to patients with hematologic malignancy who had received a hematopoietic cell transplant reported elsewhere. These findings are limited by our small sample size and may be influenced by the timing of vaccination relative to CAR T. Furthermore, almost half of our patients received IVIG post CAR T which could potentially cause false positive antibody results as pooled immunoglobulin preparations may contain COVID-19 antibodies from vaccinated healthy donors. To better understand the characteristics of the immunologic response against SARS-CoV-2 in patients post-CAR T, larger multicenter studies exploring both humoral and cellular immunity will be needed. JEWN, MI and JM are co-first authors and PV, HM and AR are co-senior authors. [Formula presented] Disclosures: Munoz: Physicians' Education Resource: Honoraria;Seattle Genetics: Honoraria;Bayer: Research Funding;Gilead/Kite Pharma: Research Funding;Celgene: Research Funding;Merck: Research Funding;Portola: Research Funding;Incyte: Research Funding;Genentech: Research Funding;Pharmacyclics: Research Funding;Seattle Genetics: Research Funding;Janssen: Research Funding;Millennium: Research Funding;Gilea /Kite Pharma, Kyowa, Bayer, Pharmacyclics/Janssen, Seattle Genetics, Acrotech/Aurobindo, Beigene, Verastem, AstraZeneca, Celgene/BMS, Genentech/Roche.: Speakers Bureau;Pharmacyclics/Abbvie, Bayer, Gilead/Kite Pharma, Pfizer, Janssen, Juno/Celgene, BMS, Kyowa, Alexion, Beigene, Fosunkite, Innovent, Seattle Genetics, Debiopharm, Karyopharm, Genmab, ADC Therapeutics, Epizyme, Beigene, Servier: Consultancy;Targeted Oncology: Honoraria;OncView: Honoraria;Kyowa: Honoraria. Bergsagel: Oncopeptides: Consultancy, Honoraria;Novartis: Consultancy, Honoraria, Patents & Royalties: human CRBN mouse;Pfizer: Consultancy, Honoraria;Celgene: Consultancy, Honoraria;Janssen: Consultancy, Honoraria;Genetech: Consultancy, Honoraria;GSK: Consultancy, Honoraria. Wang: Incyte: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;LOXO Oncology: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;Genentech: Research Funding;InnoCare: Research Funding;Novartis: Research Funding;MorphoSys: Research Funding;Eli Lilly: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;TG Therapeutics: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Fonseca: Juno: Consultancy;Kite: Consultancy;Aduro: Consultancy;OncoTracker: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;GSK: Consultancy;AbbVie: Consultancy;Patent: Prognosticaton of myeloma via FISH: Patents & Royalties;Caris Life Sciences: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Scientific Advisory Board: Adaptive Biotechnologies: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;BMS: Consultancy;Amgen: Consultancy;Sanofi: Consultancy;Merck: Consultancy;Mayo Clinic in Arizona: Current Employment;Celgene: Consultancy;Takeda: Consultancy;Bayer: Consultancy;Janssen: Consultancy;Novartis: Consultancy;Pharmacyclics: Consultancy. Palmer: Sierra Oncology: Consultancy, Research Funding;CTI BioPharma: Consultancy, Research Funding;Protagonist: Consultancy, Research Funding;Incyte: Research Funding;PharmaEssentia: Research Funding. Dingli: Novartis: Research Funding;GSK: Consultancy;Apellis: Consultancy;Alexion: Consultancy;Sanofi: Consultancy;Janssen: Consultancy. Kapoor: Sanofi: Research Funding;AbbVie: Research Funding;Takeda: Research Funding;Karyopharm: Consultancy;Cellectar: Consultancy;BeiGene: Consultancy;Pharmacyclics: Consultancy;Sanofi: Consultancy;Amgen: Research Funding;Ichnos Sciences: Research Funding;Regeneron Pharmaceuticals: Research Funding;Glaxo SmithKline: Research Funding;Karyopharm: Research Funding. Kumar: Roche-Genentech: Consultancy, Research Funding;Oncopeptides: Consultancy;Abbvie: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;BMS: Consultancy, Research Funding;Beigene: Consultancy;Celgene: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;Novartis: Research Funding;Adaptive: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;Astra-Zeneca: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;Tenebio: Research Funding;Merck: Research Funding;Carsgen: Research Funding;KITE: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;Janssen: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;Takeda: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;Amgen: Consultancy, Research Funding;Bluebird Bio: Consultancy;Antengene: Consultancy, Honoraria;Sanofi: Research Funding. Paludo: Karyopharm: Research Funding. Bennani: Kymera: Other: Advisory Board;Vividion: Other: Advisory Board;Kyowa Kirin: Other: Advisory Board;Daichii Sankyo Inc: Other: Advisory Board;Purdue Pharma: Other: Advisory Board;Verastem: Other: Advisory Board. Ansell: Bristol Myers Squibb, ADC Therapeutics, Seattle Genetics, Regeneron, Affimed, AI Therapeutics, Pfizer, Trillium and Takeda: Research Funding. Lin: Kite, a Gilead Company: Consultancy, Research Funding;Merck: Research Funding;Gamida Cell: Consultancy;Takeda: Research Funding;Juno: Consultancy;Bluebird Bio: Consultancy, Research Funding;Celgene: Consultancy, Research Funding;Novartis: Consultancy;Janssen: Consultancy, Research Funding;Sorrento: Consultancy;Legend: Consultancy;Vineti: Consultancy. Murthy: CRISPR Therapeutics: Research Funding.

4.
Blood ; 136:26, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1344061

ABSTRACT

Background Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are faced with severe disease-related fatigue among a range of other constitutional and spleen-related symptoms. The MPN-Symptom Assessment Form (SAF) is recommended for use to characterize symptom burden (Scherber R, et al. Blood 2011). Within the SAF, a profile of 18 symptom items are evaluated ranging in severity from 0 (absent) to 10 (worst imaginable). The SAF is often summarized to the MPN-SAF Total Symptom Score (TSS) for analysis purposes - a single computed sum of the 10 most clinically meaningful symptom scores, including fatigue (Emanuel R, et al. J Clin Oncol 2012). Though the SAF includes a fatigue item, initial deployments of the MPN-SAF TSS incorporated a 0-10 scaled fatigue item taken from the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI;Mendoza T, et al. Cancer 1999). A subsequent version of the MPN-SAF TSS for use within myelofibrosis clinical trials (called the MFSAF v4;Gwaltney C, et al. Leuk Res 2017) employed a harmonized fatigue item. This analysis employing data from two studies was carried out to assess the use of the SAF fatigue item within the MPN-SAF TSS for consistency with the MFSAF v4. Methods Both BFI and SAF fatigue items were included in an initial online survey evaluating disease burden among patients with MPNs. Participants were assigned to survey variants as a function of their age. Survey variants included those to receive 1 instance of either the BFI or SAF fatigue item, instances of both BFI and SAF, or 2 instances of the same fatigue item. Surveying was aimed to assess the worst symptom experience in the patient's last 24 hours. Additionally, an independent survey assessing the impact of COVID-19 among MPN patients was deployed using the SAF fatigue item for the MPN-SAF TSS. This modified version was then used to test internal validity. Pearson correlation (r) and t-tests were used to assess association, Bland-Altman methods were used to evaluate systematic agreement between BFI and SAF fatigue scores, and Cronbach's alpha was used to measure internal consistency. Results There were 229 participants assigned both BFI and SAF fatigue items within the same survey. Among them, 51% (n=117) received the BFI item first and 49% (n=112) the SAF item first. No difference was seen between first and second fatigue scores (mean difference [first-second] = 0.00;95%CI -0.18, 0.17). BFI and SAF fatigue scores were highly correlated (r=0.88, p<0.001) and showed 88.7% agreement in categorizing severe versus non-severe fatigue (score ≥ 7 versus < 7). Overall concordance in severity category was 73.4% (category [score range]: absent [0];mild [1-3];moderate [4-6];severe [7-10]). Constructing the MPN-SAF TSS using the BFI and SAF fatigue components separately, the original and modified MPN-SAF TSS were nearly identical (r=0.997, p<0.001), and had equivalent internal consistency (both Cronbach's alpha=0.88). The Bland-Altman plot further indicates the 2 fatigue measures have high agreement with no evidence of directional bias and negligible overall bias (Figure 1: regression slope = -0.04, p=0.25;mean difference=0.22;95%CI 0.05, 0.39). Within the COVID-19 survey (n=1217), the modified version of the MPN-SAF TSS was consistent with known correlates among disease characteristics (Emanuel R, et al. J Clin Oncol 2012). For example, more severe MPN-SAF TSS scores were highly correlated with low quality-of-life (n=1156, r = -0.50, p<0.001), and associated with those reporting spleen enlargement (n=301) versus not (n=617) (p<0.001;mean difference=7.7;95%CI 5.4, 10.1). Conclusion The BFI and SAF fatigue items are highly consistent in raw score, severity category, and in contribution to the MPN-SAF TSS. There was no order effect seen in which fatigue item was asked first. The independent COVID-19 survey using the modified MPN-SAF TSS was validated and shows high internal consistent. In the ongoing development to capture the symptom experience, this analysis shows disease-related fatigue is equivalently measured using the SAF fatigue survey item in h rmonization with the MFSAF v4. [Formula presented] Disclosures: Mesa: Bristol Myers Squibb: Research Funding;CTI BioPharma: Research Funding;Promedior: Research Funding;AbbVie: Research Funding;Samus Therapeutics: Research Funding;Genentech: Research Funding;Incyte: Research Funding;LaJolla Pharmaceutical Company: Consultancy;Novartis: Consultancy;Sierra Oncology: Consultancy.

5.
Perspectives in Education ; 39(1):12-28, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1175822
6.
Journal of Ethnic and Cultural Studies ; 8(2):68-88, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1134702

ABSTRACT

The inception of lockdowns by governments across the globe to control the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic has exposed many disparities in rural societies, particularly on the African continent. The social, cultural, and psychological processes have elicited variations in teachers’ responses to the devastating pandemic, illuminating African cultural realities in the quest for creating quality delivery of teaching and learning in schools. When teachers regard themselves as transformative change agents and not merely as oppressed people, this confirms their social identities and cultures and afford them opportunities to engage in critical reflection on the messages they convey in their classrooms. This case study employs semiotic analysis to explore some socio-cultural messages and emotional behaviours teachers exchange unwittingly in schools. Interviews were conducted via e-mail, as face-to-face contact with the respondents was not possible. The findings indicate that teachers conceive of themselves as disempowered “lay people” who are ill-equipped to respond adequately to situations such as the coronavirus pandemic, but are, nonetheless, “accountable” to the communities they serve. As its contribution, this paper presents teachers with the Social-Emotional coping skills of individual awareness, social awareness, and self-discovery, to help them thrive during periods of uncertainty. A semiotic reflection on the learning environment may empower teachers with inclusive and transformative strategies for ensuring their own and learners’ emotional well-being in a non-threatening learning environment beyond COVID 19. © 2021, Florida Gulf Coast University. All rights reserved.

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