Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 7 de 7
Filter
1.
Transp Policy (Oxf) ; 119: 32-44, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35185300

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has devastated the air transport industry, forcing airlines to take measures to ensure the safety of passengers and crewmembers. Among the many protective measures, mask mandate onboard the airplane is an important one, but travelers' mask-wearing intentions during flight remain uninvestigated especially in the US where mask use is a topic of on-going debate. This study focused on the mask use of airline passengers when they fly during COVID-19, using the theory of planned behavior (TPB) model to examine the relationship between nine predicting factors and the mask-wearing intention in the aircraft cabin. A survey instrument was developed to collect data from 1124 air travelers on Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk), and the data was statistically analyzed using structural equation modeling and logistic regression. Results showed that attitude, descriptive norms, risk avoidance, and information seeking significantly influenced the travelers' intention to wear a mask during flight in COVID-19. Group analysis further indicated that the four factors influenced mask-wearing intentions differently on young, middle-aged, and senior travelers. It was also found that demographic and travel characteristics including age, education, income, and travel frequency can be used to predict if the airline passenger was willing to pay a large amount to switch to airlines that adopted different mask policies during COVID-19. The findings of this study fill the research gap of air travelers' intentions to wear a mask when flying during a global pandemic and provide recommendations for mask-wearing policies to help the air transport industry recover from COVID-19.

2.
Acad Med ; 97(3): 380-384, 2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34554942

ABSTRACT

PROBLEM: Graduate medical education programs and national organizations are becoming more involved in promoting trainee financial wellness. Current literature reports residents have poor financial knowledge, high debt levels, low concern about their finances, and deficits in financial preparedness, but there has been little published on best practices for implementing financial wellness programs for residents or measuring meaningful outcomes of such programs. APPROACH: From June 2017 to 2019, the authors invited 277 internal medicine residents from the Stony Brook University Hospital, Montefiore Medical Center, and Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center residency programs to participate in financial wellness programs. Each institution held at least one 90-minute financial planning session; Stony Brook also had biannual financial wellness check-ins. Participants were invited to complete a presession, an immediate postsession, and a year-end survey to assess changes in financial planning behaviors. OUTCOMES: Survey response rates were 49% (135/277) for the presession survey, 47% (130/277) for the immediate postsession survey, and 22% (61/277) for the year-end survey. Ninety-six percent (125/130) found the sessions helpful and 98% (120/123) recommended continuing the program in the future. At year-end, the most frequent completed financial planning actions prompted by the session included saving emergency funds, creating a monthly budget, consolidating loans via the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program, contributing to retirement savings, and participating in an employer's retirement plan. Residents liked that some sessions were during intern orientation before the selection of retirement plans. Postgraduate year (PGY) 1 residents were more likely to complete positive financial planning actions and to agree or strongly agree that the session prompted them to take financial planning actions than PGY-2 and PGY-3 residents. NEXT STEPS: While financial wellness programs are well received by internal medicine residents, more robust evidence is needed on curricular delivery methods and program features that promote positive financial planning behaviors.


Subject(s)
Financial Management , Internship and Residency , Education, Medical, Graduate , Health Promotion , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 15795, 2021 08 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34349183

ABSTRACT

AgNPs are nanomaterials with many potential biomedical applications. In this study, the two novel yeast strains HX-YS and LPP-12Y capable of producing biological silver nanoparticles were isolated. Sequencing of ribosomal DNA-ITS fragments, as well as partial D1/D2 regions of 26S rDNA indicated that the strains are related to species from the genus Metschnikowia. The BioAgNPs produced by HX-YS and LPP-12Y at pH 5.0-6.0 and 26 °C ranged in size from 50 to 500 nm. The antibacterial activities of yeast BioAgNPs against five pathogenic bacteria were determined. The highest antibacterial effect was observed on P. aeruginosa, with additional obvious effects on E. coli ATCC8099 and S. aureus ATCC10231. Additionally, the BioAgNPs showed antiproliferative effects on lung cancer cell lines H1975 and A579, with low toxicity in Beas 2B normal lung cells. Therefore, the AgNPs biosynthesized by HX-YS and LPP-12Y may have potential applications in the treatment of bacterial infections and cancer.


Subject(s)
Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Escherichia coli/drug effects , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Metal Nanoparticles , Metschnikowia/metabolism , Nanostructures , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects , Silver Compounds/metabolism , Silver Compounds/pharmacology , Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects , Cell Line, Tumor , DNA, Ribosomal , Humans , Metschnikowia/genetics , Metschnikowia/isolation & purification
4.
Mol Ther Nucleic Acids ; 8: 442-449, 2017 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28918043

ABSTRACT

Lung cancer is a deadly disease that ends numerous lives around the world. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of non-coding RNAs involved in a variety of biological processes, such as cell growth, organ development, and tumorigenesis. The miR-206/133b cluster is located on the human chromosome 6p12.2, which is essential for growth and rebuilding of skeletal muscle. The miR-206/133b cluster has been verified to be dysregulated and plays a crucial role in lung cancer. miR-206 and miR-133b participate in lung tumor cell apoptosis, proliferation, migration, invasion, angiogenesis, drug resistance, and cancer treatment. The mechanisms are sophisticated, involving various target genes and molecular pathways, such as MET, EGFR, and the STAT3/HIF-1α/VEGF signal pathway. Hence, in this review, we summarize the role and potential mechanisms of the miR-206/133b cluster in lung cancer.

5.
Mol Ther Nucleic Acids ; 6: 140-149, 2017 Mar 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28325280

ABSTRACT

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs approximately 20-25 nt in length, which play crucial roles through directly binding to corresponding 3' UTR of targeted mRNAs. It has been reported that miRNAs are involved in numerous of diseases, including cancers. Recently, miR-134 has been identified to dysregulate in handles of human cancers, such as lung cancer, glioma, breast cancer, colorectal cancer, and so on. Increasing evidence indicates that miR-134 is essential for human carcinoma and participates in tumor cell proliferation, apoptosis, invasion and metastasis, drug resistance, as well as cancer diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. Nevertheless, its roles in human cancer are still ambiguous, and its mechanisms are sophisticated as well, referring to a variety of targets and signal pathways, such as STAT5B, KRAS, MAPK/ERK signal pathway, Notch pathway, etc. Herein, we review the crucial roles of miR-134 in scores of human cancers via analyzing latest investigations, which might provide evidence for cancer diagnose, treatment, prognosis, or further investigations.

6.
Oncotarget ; 7(16): 21510-26, 2016 Apr 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26909600

ABSTRACT

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) act as key regulators of multiple cancers. Hsa-miR-329 (miR-329) functions as a tumor suppressor in some malignancies. However, its role on lung cancer remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of miR-329 on the development of lung cancer. The results indicated that miR-329 was decreased in primary lung cancer tissues compared with matched adjacent normal lung tissues and very low levels were found in a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. Ectopic expression of miR-329 in lung cancer cell lines substantially repressed cell growth as evidenced by cell viability assay, colony formation assay and BrdU staining, through inhibiting cyclin D1, cyclin D2 and up-regulatiing p57(Kip2) and p21(WAF1/CIP1). In addition, miR-329 promoted NSCLC cell apoptosis, as indicated by up-regulation of key apoptosis gene cleaved caspase-3, and down-regulation of anti-apoptosis gene Bcl2. Moreover, miR-329 inhibited cellular migration and invasiveness through inhibiting matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-7 and MMP-9. Further, oncogene MET was revealed to be a putative target of miR-329, which was inversely correlated with miR-329 expression. Furthermore, down-regulation of MET by siRNA performed similar effects to over-expression of miR-329. Collectively, our results demonstrated that miR-329 played a pivotal role in lung cancer through inhibiting cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and promoting apoptosis by targeting oncogenic MET.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/genetics , Down-Regulation , Lung Neoplasms/genetics , MicroRNAs/genetics , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-met/genetics , 3' Untranslated Regions/genetics , A549 Cells , Aged , Animals , Apoptosis/genetics , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/metabolism , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/pathology , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Movement/genetics , Cell Proliferation/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic , Genes, Tumor Suppressor , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/metabolism , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Male , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Nude , Middle Aged , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-met/metabolism , RNA Interference , Transplantation, Heterologous
7.
Learn Mem ; 10(3): 187-98, 2003.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-12773583

ABSTRACT

The present study compared the effects of environmental enrichment on spatial memory, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) activity, and synaptophysin levels in middle-aged male and female mice. Prior to testing, a subset of 18-month-old male and female C57BL/6 mice was housed with two to three toys and a running wheel in the home cage for up to 29 d. Adult mice (7 mo) of both sexes and the remaining middle-aged mice were group (social) housed, but not exposed to enriching objects. After the enrichment period, all mice were tested in a 1-day version of the Morris water maze, in which both spatial and nonspatial memory were assessed. Immediately after testing, the hippocampus and frontoparietal cortex were dissected, and GAD activity and synaptophysin levels were measured. Environmental enrichment reduced the age-related impairment in spatial acquisition and retention; relative to adult social controls, middle-aged enriched mice were unimpaired, whereas middle-aged social controls were impaired. This reduction was similar in middle-aged males and females. Enrichment did not affect cued memory in either sex. Although hippocampal GAD activity was increased by enrichment in males, all other neurochemical measurements were unaffected by enrichment or aging in either sex. These data suggest that environmental enrichment initiated at middle age can reduce age-related impairments in spatial memory in males and females, although the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of this effect remain unknown.


Subject(s)
Aging/physiology , Environment , Maze Learning/physiology , Spatial Behavior/physiology , Animals , Discrimination Learning/physiology , Female , Frontal Lobe/metabolism , Glutamate Decarboxylase/metabolism , Hippocampus/metabolism , Housing, Animal , Male , Memory Disorders/prevention & control , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Parietal Lobe/metabolism , Sex Distribution , Synaptophysin/metabolism
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL