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1.
Autophagy ; : 1-17, 2022 Mar 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1722064

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infections have resulted in a very large number of severe cases of COVID-19 and deaths worldwide. However, knowledge of SARS-CoV-2 infection, pathogenesis and therapy remains limited, emphasizing the urgent need for fundamental studies and drug development. Studies have shown that induction of macroautophagy/autophagy and hijacking of the autophagic machinery are essential for the infection and replication of SARS-CoV-2; however, the mechanism of this manipulation and the function of autophagy during SARS-CoV-2 infection remain unclear. In the present study, we identified ORF3a as an inducer of autophagy (in particular reticulophagy) and revealed that ORF3a localizes to the ER and induces RETREG1/FAM134B-related reticulophagy through the HMGB1-BECN1 (beclin 1) pathway. As a consequence, ORF3a induces ER stress and inflammatory responses through reticulophagy and then sensitizes cells to the acquisition of an ER stress-related early apoptotic phenotype and facilitates SARS-CoV-2 infection, suggesting that SARS-CoV-2 ORF3a hijacks reticulophagy and then disrupts ER homeostasis to induce ER stress and inflammatory responses during SARS-CoV-2 infection. These findings reveal the sequential induction of reticulophagy, ER stress and acute inflammatory responses during SARS-CoV-2 infection and imply the therapeutic potential of reticulophagy and ER stress-related drugs for COVID-19.

2.
Adv Sci (Weinh) ; 9(11): e2105378, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1680239

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 Delta (B.1.617.2) strain is a variant of concern (VOC) that has become the dominant strain worldwide in 2021. Its transmission capacity is approximately twice that of the original strain, with a shorter incubation period and higher viral load during infection. Importantly, the breakthrough infections of the Delta variant have continued to emerge in the first-generation vaccine recipients. There is thus an urgent need to develop a novel vaccine with SARS-CoV-2 variants as the major target. Here, receptor binding domain (RBD)-conjugated nanoparticle vaccines targeting the Delta variant, as well as the early and Beta/Gamma strains, are developed. Under both a single-dose and a prime-boost strategy, these RBD-conjugated nanoparticle vaccines induce the abundant neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) and significantly protect hACE2 mice from infection by the authentic SARS-CoV-2 Delta strain, as well as the early and Beta strains. Furthermore, the elicitation of the robust production of broader cross-protective NAbs against almost all the notable SARS-CoV-2 variants including the Omicron variant in rhesus macaques by the third re-boost with trivalent vaccines is found. These results suggest that RBD-based monovalent or multivalent nanoparticle vaccines provide a promising second-generation vaccine strategy for SARS-CoV-2 variants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nanoparticles , Animals , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies , COVID-19/prevention & control , Macaca mulatta/metabolism , Mice , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Vaccines, Conjugate
3.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 7(1): 7, 2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606287

ABSTRACT

Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates class-switch recombination and somatic hypermutation (SHM) in antibody genes. Protein expression and activity are tightly controlled by various mechanisms. However, it remains unknown whether a signal from the extracellular environment directly affects the AID activity in the nucleus where it works. Here, we demonstrated that a deubiquitinase USP10, which specifically stabilizes nuclear AID protein, can translocate into the nucleus after AKT-mediated phosphorylation at its T674 within the NLS domain. Interestingly, the signals from BCR and TLR1/2 synergistically promoted this phosphorylation. The deficiency of USP10 in B cells significantly decreased AID protein levels, subsequently reducing neutralizing antibody production after immunization with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) or human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nanoparticle vaccines. Collectively, we demonstrated that USP10 functions as an integrator for both BCR and TLR signals and directly regulates nuclear AID activity. Its manipulation could be used for the development of vaccines and adjuvants.


Subject(s)
AIDS Vaccines/immunology , B-Cell Activating Factor/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Cytidine Deaminase/immunology , HIV-1/immunology , Nanoparticles , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Signal Transduction/immunology , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase/immunology , Ubiquitination/immunology , AIDS Vaccines/genetics , Animals , B-Cell Activating Factor/genetics , COVID-19 Vaccines/genetics , Cytidine Deaminase/genetics , HEK293 Cells , HIV-1/genetics , Humans , Mice , Mice, Knockout , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Signal Transduction/genetics , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase/genetics
4.
Cell Rep ; 38(3): 110256, 2022 01 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1588136

ABSTRACT

Inoculation against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is ongoing worldwide. However, the emergence of SARS-CoV-2 variants could cause immune evasion. We developed a bivalent nanoparticle vaccine that displays the receptor binding domains (RBDs) of the D614G and B.1.351 strains. With a prime-boost or a single-dose strategy, this vaccine elicits a robust neutralizing antibody and full protection against infection with the authentic D614G or B.1.351 strain in human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 transgene mice. Interestingly, 8 months after inoculation with the D614G-specific vaccine, a new boost with this bivalent vaccine potently elicits cross-neutralizing antibodies for SARS-CoV-2 variants in rhesus macaques. We suggest that the D614G/B.1.351 bivalent vaccine could be used as an initial single dose or a sequential enforcement dose to prevent infection with SARS-CoV-2 and its variants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross Protection , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccines, Combined/therapeutic use , Animals , CHO Cells , COVID-19 Vaccines/chemical synthesis , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cricetulus , Cross Protection/immunology , Female , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Macaca mulatta , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Transgenic , Nanoparticles , Vaccination/methods , Vaccines, Combined/chemical synthesis , Vaccines, Combined/immunology , Vero Cells
5.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 420, 2021 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585885

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is identified as a zoonotic disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, which also can cross-transmit to many animals but not mice. Genetic modifications of SARS-CoV-2 or mice enable the mice susceptible to viral infection. Although neither is the natural situation, they are currently utilized to establish mouse infection models. Here we report a direct contact transmission of SARS-CoV-2 variant B.1.351 in wild-type mice. The SARS-CoV-2 (B.1.351) replicated efficiently and induced significant pathological changes in lungs and tracheas, accompanied by elevated proinflammatory cytokines in the lungs and sera. Mechanistically, the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV-2 (B.1.351) spike protein turned to a high binding affinity to mouse angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (mACE2), allowing the mice highly susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 (B.1.351) infection. Our work suggests that SARS-CoV-2 (B.1.351) expands the host range and therefore increases its transmission route without adapted mutation. As the wild house mice live with human populations quite closely, this possible transmission route could be potentially risky. In addition, because SARS-CoV-2 (B.1.351) is one of the major epidemic strains and the mACE2 in laboratory-used mice is naturally expressed and regulated, the SARS-CoV-2 (B.1.351)/mice could be a much convenient animal model system to study COVID-19 pathogenesis and evaluate antiviral inhibitors and vaccines.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/transmission , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Receptors, Virus/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Gene Expression , HEK293 Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , Receptors, Virus/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Virus Replication
7.
Advanced Materials ; 33(49):2170388, 2021.
Article in English | Wiley | ID: covidwho-1557818

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 Therapy In their work reported in article number 2103471, Long Zhang, Fangfang Zhou, and co-workers fuse the S-palmitoylation-dependent plasma membrane (PM) targeting sequence with angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and engineer extracellular vesicles (EVs) on their surface enriched with palmitoylated ACE2 (PM-ACE2-EVs). The PM-ACE2-EVs can bind to the SARS-CoV-2 S-RBD with high affinity and block its interaction with cell-surface ACE2, thereby preventing SARS-CoV-2 from entering the host cell. This study provides a novel EV-based candidate for prophylactic and therapeutic treatment against COVID-19.

8.
Adv Mater ; : e2103471, 2021 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1473796

ABSTRACT

Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a key receptor present on cell surfaces that directly interacts with the viral spike (S) protein of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). It is proposed that inhibiting this interaction can be promising in treating COVID-19. Here, the presence of ACE2 in extracellular vesicles (EVs) is reported and the EV-ACE2 levels are determined by protein palmitoylation. The Cys141 and Cys498 residues on ACE2 are S-palmitoylated by zinc finger DHHC-Type Palmitoyltransferase 3 (ZDHHC3) and de-palmitoylated by acyl protein thioesterase 1 (LYPLA1), which is critical for the membrane-targeting of ACE2 and their EV secretion. Importantly, by fusing the S-palmitoylation-dependent plasma membrane (PM) targeting sequence with ACE2, EVs enriched with ACE2 on their surface (referred to as PM-ACE2-EVs) are engineered. It is shown that PM-ACE2-EVs can bind to the SARS-CoV-2 S-RBD with high affinity and block its interaction with cell surface ACE2 in vitro. PM-ACE2-EVs show neutralization potency against pseudotyped and authentic SARS-CoV-2 in human ACE2 (hACE2) transgenic mice, efficiently block viral load of authentic SARS-CoV-2, and thus protect host against SARS-CoV-2-induced lung inflammation. The study provides an efficient engineering protocol for constructing a promising, novel biomaterial for application in prophylactic and therapeutic treatments against COVID-19.

10.
Aslib Journal of Information Management ; 73(5):720-753, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1393565

ABSTRACT

PurposeQualitative methods are not suitable to process high volumes of policy texts for exploring policy evolution. Therefore, it is hard to use qualitative methods to systematically analyze the characteristics of complex policy networks. So the authors propose a bibliometric research study for exploring policy evolution from time–agency–theme perspectives to excavate the rules and existing problems of China's medical informatization policy and to provide suggestions for formulating and improving the future medical informatization policies.Design/methodology/approachInitially, 615 valid samples are obtained by retrieving related China's medical informatization policy documents, and the joint policy-making agency network and the co-occurrence network models of medical informatization policies are defined, and then the authors research China's medical informatization policies from single-dimension and multi-dimension view.FindingsThe analysis results reveal that China's medical informatization policy process can be divided into four stages;the policy-making agencies are divided into four subgroups by community detection analysis according to the fast unfolding algorithm;the core policy theme keywords are identified based on the eigenvector centrality of the nodes in those networks;the focuses of theme terms are varied in different stages and the correlations between agencies and themes are gradually decentralized.Practical implicationsThese findings provide experience and evidence on leveraging informatics in the medical and healthcare field of China. Also, they can help scholars and practitioners better understand the current status and future directions of medical and healthcare informatics development in China and provide a reference to formulate and improve China's future medical informatization policies.Originality/valueThis study proposes a quantitative bibliometric-based research framework to describe transitions and trends of China's medical informatization policy.

11.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 5000, 2021 08 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1361637

ABSTRACT

The successive emergences and accelerating spread of novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) lineages and evolved resistance to some ongoing clinical therapeutics increase the risks associated with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. An urgent intervention for broadly effective therapies to limit the morbidity and mortality of COVID-19 and future transmission events from SARS-related coronaviruses (SARSr-CoVs) is needed. Here, we isolate and humanize an angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2)-blocking monoclonal antibody (MAb), named h11B11, which exhibits potent inhibitory activity against SARS-CoV and circulating global SARS-CoV-2 lineages. When administered therapeutically or prophylactically in the hACE2 mouse model, h11B11 alleviates and prevents SARS-CoV-2 replication and virus-induced pathological syndromes. No significant changes in blood pressure and hematology chemistry toxicology were observed after injections of multiple high dosages of h11B11 in cynomolgus monkeys. Analysis of the structures of the h11B11/ACE2 and receptor-binding domain (RBD)/ACE2 complexes shows hindrance and epitope competition of the MAb and RBD for the receptor. Together, these results suggest h11B11 as a potential therapeutic countermeasure against SARS-CoV, SARS-CoV-2, and escape variants.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Disease Models, Animal , Epitopes , Female , HEK293 Cells , Haplorhini , Humans , Macaca fascicularis , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Vero Cells , Virus Activation
12.
Nat Cell Biol ; 23(7): 718-732, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303773

ABSTRACT

Patients with Coronavirus disease 2019 exhibit low expression of interferon-stimulated genes, contributing to a limited antiviral response. Uncovering the underlying mechanism of innate immune suppression and rescuing the innate antiviral response remain urgent issues in the current pandemic. Here we identified that the dimerization domain of the SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein (SARS2-NP) is required for SARS2-NP to undergo liquid-liquid phase separation with RNA, which inhibits Lys63-linked poly-ubiquitination and aggregation of MAVS and thereby suppresses the innate antiviral immune response. Mice infected with an RNA virus carrying SARS2-NP exhibited reduced innate immunity, an increased viral load and high morbidity. Notably, we identified SARS2-NP acetylation at Lys375 by host acetyltransferase and reported frequently occurring acetylation-mimicking mutations of Lys375, all of which impaired SARS2-NP liquid-liquid phase separation with RNA. Importantly, a peptide targeting the dimerization domain was screened out to disrupt the SARS2-NP liquid-liquid phase separation and demonstrated to inhibit SARS-CoV-2 replication and rescue innate antiviral immunity both in vitro and in vivo.


Subject(s)
Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Animals , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Immunity, Innate/physiology , Mice , Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , RNA Viruses/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
13.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(19): e25979, 2021 May 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262278

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is a worldwide outbreak of COVID-19, and as the number of patients increases, an increasing number of patients are recovering. However, no relevant systematic review or meta-analysis has been designed to evaluate the effects of acupoint herbal patching on the life of patients recovering from COVID-19. METHODS: The following electronic databases will be searched from the respective dates of database inception to April 20, 2021: The Cochrane Library, Web of Science, EMBASE, MEDLINE, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), Wanfang database, the Chinese Scientific Journal Database (VIP), and other sources. All published randomized controlled trials in English or Chinese related to acupoint herbal patching for COVID-19 will be included. The primary outcome was the timing of the influence of acupoint herbal patching on the quality of life of convalescent patients. Secondary outcomes were accompanying symptoms (such as myalgia, expectoration, stuffiness, runny nose, pharyngalgia, anhelation, chest distress, dyspnea, crackles, headache, nausea, vomiting, anorexia, diarrhea) disappearance rate, negative COVID-19 results rate on two consecutive occasions (not on the same day), average hospitalization time, clinical curative effect, and improved quality of life. RESULTS: The main purpose of this systematic review protocol was to assess the effectiveness and safety of acupoint herbal patching therapy for treating patients recovering from COVID-19. CONCLUSION: The conclusion of our study will provide evidence to judge whether acupoint herbal patching is an effective intervention for the quality of life in patients recovering. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021246550.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Points , Acupuncture Therapy/methods , COVID-19/rehabilitation , Quality of Life , COVID-19/physiopathology , Humans , Length of Stay , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(23)2021 06 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238060

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has become a global pandemic and has claimed over 2 million lives worldwide. Although the genetic sequences of SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 have high homology, the clinical and pathological characteristics of COVID-19 differ significantly from those of SARS. How and whether SARS-CoV-2 evades (cellular) immune surveillance requires further elucidation. In this study, we show that SARS-CoV-2 infection leads to major histocompability complex class Ι (MHC-Ι) down-regulation both in vitro and in vivo. The viral protein encoded by open reading frame 8 (ORF8) of SARS-CoV-2, which shares the least homology with SARS-CoV among all viral proteins, directly interacts with MHC-Ι molecules and mediates their down-regulation. In ORF8-expressing cells, MHC-Ι molecules are selectively targeted for lysosomal degradation via autophagy. Thus, SARS-CoV-2-infected cells are much less sensitive to lysis by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Because ORF8 protein impairs the antigen presentation system, inhibition of ORF8 could be a strategy to improve immune surveillance.


Subject(s)
Antigen Presentation , COVID-19/immunology , Down-Regulation/immunology , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/immunology , Immune Evasion , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Viral Proteins/immunology , Animals , Autophagy/genetics , Autophagy/immunology , COVID-19/genetics , Chlorocebus aethiops , HEK293 Cells , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/genetics , Humans , Lysosomes/genetics , Lysosomes/immunology , Lysosomes/virology , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vero Cells , Viral Proteins/genetics
15.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 189, 2021 05 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1226420

ABSTRACT

Since the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), it has become a global pandemic. The spike (S) protein of etiologic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) specifically recognizes human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (hACE2) as its receptor, which is recently identified as an interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene. Here, we find that hACE2 exists on the surface of exosomes released by different cell types, and the expression of exosomal hACE2 is increased by IFNα/ß treatment. In particular, exosomal hACE2 can specifically block the cell entry of SARS-CoV-2, subsequently inhibit the replication of SARS-CoV-2 in vitro and ex vivo. Our findings have indicated that IFN is able to upregulate a viral receptor on the exosomes which competitively block the virus entry, exhibiting a potential antiviral strategy.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Exosomes/metabolism , Interferon-alpha/pharmacology , Interferon-beta/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Exosomes/genetics , Exosomes/virology , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Vero Cells
16.
mBio ; 12(1)2021 01 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066818

ABSTRACT

The etiologic agent of COVID-19 is highly contagious and has caused a severe global pandemic. Until now, there has been no simple and reliable system available in a lower-biosafety-grade laboratory for SARS-CoV-2 virologic research and inhibitor screening. In this study, we reported a replicon system which consists of four plasmids expressing the required segments of SARS-CoV-2. Our study revealed that the features for viral RNA synthesis and responses to antivirus drugs of the replicon are similar to those of wild-type viruses. Further analysis indicated that ORF6 provided potent in trans stimulation of the viral replication. Some viral variations, such as 5'UTR-C241T and ORF8-(T28144C) L84S mutation, also exhibit their different impact upon viral replication. Besides, the screening of clinically used drugs identified that several tyrosine kinase inhibitors and DNA-Top II inhibitors potently inhibit the replicon, as well as authentic SARS-CoV-2 viruses. Collectively, this replicon system provides a biosafety-worry-free platform for studying SARS-CoV-2 virology, monitoring the functional impact of viral mutations, and developing viral inhibitors.IMPORTANCE COVID-19 has caused a severe global pandemic. Until now, there has been no simple and reliable system available in a lower-biosafety-grade laboratory for SARS-CoV-2 virologic research and inhibitor screening. We reported a replicon system which consists of four ordinary plasmids expressing the required segments of SARS-CoV-2. Using the replicon system, we developed three application scenarios: (i) to identify the effects of viral proteins on virus replication, (ii) to identify the effects of mutations on viral replication during viral epidemics, and (iii) to perform high-throughput screening of antiviral drugs. Collectively, this replicon system would be useful for virologists to study SARS-CoV-2 virology, for epidemiologists to monitor virus mutations, and for industry to develop antiviral drugs.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/virology , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , Replicon/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , Female , Genetic Engineering , HEK293 Cells , High-Throughput Screening Assays , Humans , Inhibitory Concentration 50 , Mutation , Pandemics , RNA, Viral/genetics , Replicon/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Virus Replication/drug effects
17.
Immunity ; 53(6): 1315-1330.e9, 2020 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-967948

ABSTRACT

Various vaccine strategies have been proposed in response to the global COVID-19 pandemic, each with unique strategies for eliciting immune responses. Here, we developed nanoparticle vaccines by covalently conjugating the self-assembled 24-mer ferritin to the receptor binding domain (RBD) and/or heptad repeat (HR) subunits of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) spike (S) protein. Compared to monomer vaccines, nanoparticle vaccines elicited more robust neutralizing antibodies and cellular immune responses. RBD and RBD-HR nanoparticle vaccinated hACE2 transgenic mice vaccinated with RBD and/or RBD-HR nanoparticles exhibited reduced viral load in the lungs after SARS-CoV-2 challenge. RBD-HR nanoparticle vaccines also promoted neutralizing antibodies and cellular immune responses against other coronaviruses. The nanoparticle vaccination of rhesus macaques induced neutralizing antibodies, and T and B cell responses prior to boost immunization; these responses persisted for more than three months. RBD- and HR-based nanoparticles thus present a promising vaccination approach against SARS-CoV-2 and other coronaviruses.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Proteins/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Ferritins/immunology , Helicobacter pylori/metabolism , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , Bacterial Proteins/chemistry , COVID-19 Vaccines/chemistry , Ferritins/chemistry , Humans , Macaca mulatta , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Nanoparticles/chemistry , Pandemics , Protein Binding , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Vaccination
18.
Cell Mol Immunol ; 17(10): 1098-1100, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-772968
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