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3.
Biomedicines ; 10(4)2022 Apr 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776130

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection has raised concerns in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), not only due to consequences of coronavirus disease 2019 itself but also as a possible cause of IBD relapse. The main objective of this study was to assess the role of SARS-CoV-2 in IBD clinical recurrence in a cohort of patients undergoing biological therapy. Second, we evaluated the difference in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels between the start and end of the follow-up period (ΔCRP) and the rate of biological therapy discontinuation. Patients with IBD positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection were compared with non-infected patients. IBD recurrence was defined as the need for intensification of current therapy. We enrolled 95 IBD patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection and 190 non-infected patients. During follow-up, 11 of 95 (11.6%) SARS-CoV-2-infected patients experienced disease recurrence compared to 21 of 190 (11.3%) in the control group (p = 0.894). Forty-six (48.4%) SARS-CoV-2-infected patients discontinued biological therapy versus seven (3.7%) in the control group (p < 0.01). In the multivariate analysis, biological agent discontinuation (p = 0.033) and ΔCRP (p = 0.017), but not SARS-CoV-2 infection (p = 0.298), were associated with IBD recurrence. SARS-CoV-2 infection was not associated with increased IBD recurrence rates in this cohort of patients treated with biological agents.

5.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(3)2021 Mar 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1167770

ABSTRACT

The severity of the COVID-19 pandemic has led to an unprecedented effort to develop vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 infection since this seems to be the most effective strategy to counter the pandemic. In the past weeks, the administration of vaccines has started in different parts of the world sustaining the hype of significantly containing the impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, the rapid time lapse from vaccine development to distribution has raised several concerns on its safety and efficacy. This topic is particularly felt by patients with chronic conditions and immumodulating therapies that could compromise their immune system such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Here, we explore the potential future implications of the SARS-CoV-2 vaccines introduction in the IBD field, touching upon the clinical experience coming from available data on vaccinations against other infections. We also dissect the factors associated with the acceptability of SARS-CoV-2 vaccination, describing the possible strategies that gastroenterologist should adopt to reach the highest rate of vaccinations in IBD patients.

8.
Therap Adv Gastroenterol ; 13: 1756284820968747, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-892354

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has raised several concerns for patients with chronic immune-mediated diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). As the outbreak appears to be in the descending phase, at least in some part of the world, as in most European countries, guidance is urgently needed to provide optimal care for our IBD patients in order to gradually and safely reduce the gap in care that has been accumulated in the months of lockdown and to face all the backlogs. Therefore, we have provided a decalogue of practical recommendations for gastroenterologists to manage patients with IBD in the post-peak phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. They include all the aspects of IBD care, not only pharmacological ones but also endoscopy, surgery, psychological treatment, telemedicine, diagnostics and educational tasks provided by doctors and patient associations.

9.
10.
Am J Gastroenterol ; 115(10): 1722-1724, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-725265

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: It has been hypothesized that people suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). However, it is not known whether immunosuppressive therapies exacerbate the COVID-19 outcome. METHODS: We reviewed data on the prevalence and clinical outcomes of COVID-19 in patients with IBD. RESULTS: COVID-19 prevalence in patients with IBD was comparable with that in the general population. Therapies using antitumor necrosis factor-α agents have been associated with better clinical outcomes. DISCUSSION: Management and treatments provided by gastroenterologists were effective in reducing COVID-19 risk. Antitumor necrosis factor-α agents seem to mitigate the course of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Humans , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/immunology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/antagonists & inhibitors , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/immunology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/pharmacology
11.
Endosc Int Open ; 8(7): E980-E984, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-630898

ABSTRACT

Background and study aims The COVID-19 pandemic is having a major clinical and also organizational impact on national health care systems, particularly in high-volume hospitals that are utilized for several essential clinical needs. We aimed to analyze the short-term impact of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic on management of endoscopic procedures in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Patients and methods This was an observational prospective study exploring major clinical and organizational changes in endoscopic management at the IBD Center - CEMAD of the Fondazione Policlinico Gemelli IRCCS, Rome, Italy since the beginning of SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Results Our IBD Unit, with up to 1,500 IBD patients receiving biotechnological or experimental therapy, represents a high-volume Italian and European IBD center. Since the beginning of the outbreak, our hospital has been extremely impacted by care related to COVID-19 cases, with a consequent need to dramatically reorganize management of endoscopic procedures for IBD. Conclusions Outbreak restrictions have significantly impacted the volume of endoscopic activities for IBD. Specific strategies have been designed to guarantee a high level of safety for both patients with IBD and healthcare personnel dedicated to their treatment.

12.
United European Gastroenterol J ; 8(7): 775-781, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-326971

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is having a major clinical as well as organisational impact on the national health-care system in Italy, particularly in high-volume hospitals which are usually active for many essential clinical needs, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Here, we report major clinical and organisational challenges at a high-volume Italian IBD centre one month after the start of the Italian government's restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic. All routine follow-up IBD visits of patients in remission were cancelled or rescheduled for 8-12 weeks' time. However, access to the hospital for therapy or for unstable/relapsing patients was not considered postponable. Everyone attending the centre (e.g. physicians, nurses, administrative personnel and patients) were advised to respect the general recommended rules for hand hygiene and social distancing, to disclose if they had a fever or cough or flu-like symptoms and to wear a surgical mask and gloves. At the entrance of the therapy area, a control station was set up in order to double-check all patients with a clinical interview and conduct thermal scanning. A total of 1451 IBD patients under biotechnological or experimental therapy actively followed in the CEMAD IBD centre were included in the study. About 65% of patients maintained their appointment schedules without major problems, while in 20% of cases planned infusions were delayed because of the patient's decision or practical issues. About 10% of patients receiving subcutaneous therapy were allowed to collect their medicine without a follow-up visit. Finally, 10% of patients living outside the Lazio region requested access to their therapy at a local centre closer to their home. At present, five patients have been found to be positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection but with minimal symptoms, 22 are in 'quarantine' for contact considered to be 'at risk' for the infection. Up to now, none of them has experienced significant symptoms. This study represents the first observational detailed report about short-term impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on patient organisation and management in a high-volume IBD centre.


Subject(s)
Biological Products/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Hospitals, High-Volume/standards , Infection Control/organization & administration , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/drug therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Adult , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Health Personnel/standards , Humans , Infection Control/instrumentation , Infection Control/standards , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/prevention & control , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/immunology , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
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