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1.
Annals of Intensive Care ; 12(1), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1837681

ABSTRACT

BackgroundIn-person mass gathering events (MGE) are returning after a period of restrictions, yet few prospective scientific evaluations of their safety are available.MethodsProspective observational study, including both attendees of the French Intensive Care Society (FICS) annual meeting held in Paris between June the 9th and June the 11th, 2021 and matched controls (healthcare professionals who stayed in the ICU during the conference). SARS-CoV-2 lateral flow test was performed on day 7. Follow-up occurred until day 21.ResultsOut of the 1824 healthcare professionals attending the congress (all of which fulfilled legal requirements: 7 days or more following a second dose of vaccine or a negative PCR test performed within less than 72 h), 520 (28.5%) agreed to participate. Follow-up data were received for 216 (41.5%) out of the 520 included attendees, and for 191 matched controls. No positive SARS-CoV-2 lateral flow test was reported in the attendees or in the matched controls. The probability of SARS-CoV-2 infection during the MGE was less than 1.7% in the attendees (95% confidence interval [0;1.7%]), less than 2% in the controls (95%CI [0;2%]) and the difference in probabilities of infection was less than 1.9% (95% CI [0;1.9%]).ConclusionDuring a low incidence period, in this population of congress attendees screened for SARS-CoV-2 by a lateral flow test at day 7, no positive cases could be documented, no concomitant infection occurred in the matched controls;suggesting no extra risk of infection during the MGE.Trial Registration: ClinicalTrial.gov, #NCT04918160.

2.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-335386

ABSTRACT

Background: Kidney failure is the second most frequent condition after acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in critically ill patients with severe COVID-19 and is strongly associated with mortality. The aim of this multicentric study was to assess the impact of the specific treatments of COVID-19 and ARDS on the risk of severe acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill COVID-19 patients.MethodsIn this cohort study, data from consecutive patients hospitalized in 6 ICUs for COVID-19 were retrospectively collected. The incidence and severity of AKI were monitored during the entire ICU stay. Patients older than 18 years admitted to the ICU for COVID-19-related ARDS requiring invasive mechanical ventilation were included.Results164 patients were included in the final analysis, 97 (59.1%) displayed AKI, of which 39 (23.8%) severe stage 3 AKI and 21 (12.8%) requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT). In univariate analysis, severe AKI was associated with Angiotensin Converting Enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) exposure (p=0.016), arterial hypertension (p=0.029), APACHE-II score (p=0.004) and mortality at D28 (p=0.008), D60 (p<0.001) and D90 (p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, the factors associated with the onset of stage 3 AKI were: exposure to ACEI (OR: 4.238 (1.307-13.736), p=0.016), APACHE II score (without age) (OR: 1.138 (1.044-1.241), p=0.003) and iNO (OR: 5.694 (1.953-16.606), p=0.001). Protective factors were prone positioning (OR: 0.234 (0.057-0.967), p=0.045) and dexamethasone (OR: 0.194 (0.053-0.713), p=0.014).ConclusionsDexamethasone was associated with a prevention of the risk of severe AKI and RRT, and iNO was associated with severe AKI and RRT in critically ill patients with COVID-19. iNO should be used with caution in COVID-19 related ARDS.

3.
Intensive Care Med ; 48(3): 270-280, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1813641

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Previous studies support the potential efficacy of venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (vvECMO) for improving survival in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) cases. Prone positioning (PP) has been shown to improve the outcomes of moderate-to-severe ARDS patients. Few studies and no randomized controlled trials have evaluated the effect of PP performed in ECMO patients. METHODS: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis examining the effect of prone positioning for ARDS patients receiving vvECMO on survival. All authors were contacted to obtain complementary information not mentioned in the original articles. The main objective was to compare 28-day survival in vvECMO patients with PP to vvECMO patients without PP (controls). RESULTS: Thirteen studies with a combined population of 1836 patients satisfied the inclusion criteria. PP was associated with a significant improvement in 28-day survival (503 survivors among 681 patients in the PP group [74%; 95% CI 71-77] vs. 450 survivors among 770 patients in the control group [58%, 95% CI 55-62]; RR 1.31 [95% CI 1.21-1.41]; I2 22% [95% CI 0-62%]; P < 0.0001). Survival was also improved in terms of other endpoints (60-day survival, 90-day survival, ICU survival, and hospital survival). In contrast, the duration of mechanical ventilation was increased in vvECMO patients with PP (mean difference 11.4 days [95% CI 9.2-13.5]; 0.64 [95% CI 0.50-0.78]; I2 8%; P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: According to this meta-analysis, survival was improved when prone positioning was used in ARDS patients receiving vvECMO. The impact of this combination on survival should be investigated in prospective randomized controlled trials.


Subject(s)
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Adult , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/adverse effects , Humans , Prone Position , Prospective Studies , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Retrospective Studies
4.
JAMA ; 327(11): 1042-1050, 2022 Mar 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1763144

ABSTRACT

IMPORTANCE: Persistent physical and mental disorders are frequent in survivors of COVID-19-related acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, data on these disorders among family members are scarce. OBJECTIVE: To determine the association between patient hospitalization for COVID-19 ARDS vs ARDS from other causes and the risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-related symptoms in family members. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Prospective cohort study in 23 intensive care units (ICUs) in France (January 2020 to June 2020 with final follow-up ending in October 2020). ARDS survivors and family members (1 family member per patient) were enrolled. EXPOSURES: Family members of patients hospitalized for ARDS due to COVID-19 vs ARDS due to other causes. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: The primary outcome was family member symptoms of PTSD at 90 days after ICU discharge, measured by the Impact of Events Scale-Revised (score range, 0 [best] to 88 [worst]; presence of PTSD symptoms defined by score >22). Secondary outcomes were family member symptoms of anxiety and depression at 90 days assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (score range, 0 [best] to 42 [worst]; presence of anxiety or depression symptoms defined by subscale scores ≥7). Multivariable logistic regression models were used to determine the association between COVID-19 status and outcomes. RESULTS: Among 602 family members and 307 patients prospectively enrolled, 517 (86%) family members (median [IQR] age, 51 [40-63] years; 72% women; 48% spouses; 26% bereaved because of the study patient's death; 303 [50%] family members of COVID-19 patients) and 273 (89%) patients (median [IQR] age, 61 [50-69] years; 34% women; 181 [59%] with COVID-19) completed the day-90 assessment. Compared with non-COVID-19 ARDS, family members of patients with COVID-19 ARDS had a significantly higher prevalence of symptoms of PTSD (35% [103/293] vs 19% [40/211]; difference, 16% [95% CI, 8%-24%]; P < .001), symptoms of anxiety (41% [121/294] vs 34% [70/207]; difference, 8% [95% CI, 0%-16%]; P= .05), and symptoms of depression (31% [91/291] vs 18% [37/209]; difference, 13% [95% CI, 6%-21%]; P< .001). In multivariable models adjusting for age, sex, and level of social support, COVID-19 ARDS was significantly associated with increased risk of PTSD-related symptoms in family members (odds ratio, 2.05 [95% CI, 1.30 to 3.23]). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Among family members of patients hospitalized in the ICU with ARDS, COVID-19 disease, as compared with other causes of ARDS, was significantly associated with increased risk of symptoms of PTSD at 90 days after ICU discharge. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04341519.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Family Health , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Adult , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge , Prospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology
5.
Ann Intensive Care ; 11(1): 157, 2021 Nov 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518296

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since March 2020, health care systems were importantly affected by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) outbreak, with some patients presenting severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), requiring extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). We designed an ambispective observational cohort study including all consecutive adult patients admitted to 5 different ICUs from a university hospital. The main objective was to identify the risk factors of severe COVID-19 ARDS patients supported by ECMO associated with 90-day survival. RESULTS: Between March 1st and November 30th 2020, 76 patients with severe COVID-19 ARDS were supported by ECMO. Median (interquartile range IQR) duration of mechanical ventilation (MV) prior to ECMO was of 6 (3-10) days. At ECMO initiation, patients had a median PaO2:FiO2 of 71 mmHg (IQR 62-81), median PaCO2 of 58 mmHg (IQR 51-66) and a median arterial pH of 7.33 (IQR 7.25-7.38). Forty-five patients (59%) were weaned from ECMO. Twenty-eight day, 60-day and 90-day survival rates were, respectively, 92, 62 and 51%. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, with 2 models, one with the RESP score and one with the PRESERVE score, we found that higher BMI was associated with higher 90-day survival [odds ratio (OR): 0.775 (0.644-0.934), p = 0.007) and 0.631 (0.462-0.862), respectively]. Younger age was also associated with 90-day survival in both models [OR: 1.1354 (1.004-1.285), p = 0.044 and 1.187 (1.035-1.362), p = 0.014 respectively]. Obese patients were ventilated with higher PEEP than non-obese patients and presented slightly higher respiratory system compliance. CONCLUSION: In this ambispective observational cohort of COVID-19 severe ARDS supported by ECMO, obesity was an independent factor associated with improved survival at 90-day.

7.
Chest ; 160(3): 944-955, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275208

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Working in the ICU during the first COVID-19 wave was associated with high levels of mental health disorders. RESEARCH QUESTION: What are the mental health symptoms in health care providers (HCPs) facing the second wave? STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study (October 30-December 1, 2020) was conducted in 16 ICUs during the second wave in France. HCPs completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (for post-traumatic stress disorder), and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. RESULTS: Of 1,203 HCPs, 845 responded (70%) (66% nursing staff, 32% medical staff, 2% other professionals); 487 (57.6%) had treated more than 10 new patients with COVID-19 in the previous week. Insomnia affected 320 (37.9%), and 7.7% were taking a psychotropic drug daily. Symptoms of anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and burnout were reported in 60.0% (95% CI, 56.6%-63.3%), 36.1% (95% CI, 32.9%-39.5%), 28.4% (95% CI, 25.4%-31.6%), and 45.1% (95% CI, 41.7%-48.5%) of respondents, respectively. Independent predictors of such symptoms included respondent characteristics (sex, profession, experience, personality traits), work organization (ability to rest and to care for family), and self-perceptions (fear of becoming infected or of infecting family and friends, feeling pressure related to the surge, intention to leave the ICU, lassitude, working conditions, feeling they had a high-risk profession, and "missing the clapping"). The number of patients with COVID-19 treated in the first wave or over the last week was not associated with symptoms of mental health disorders. INTERPRETATION: The prevalence of symptoms of mental health disorders is high in ICU HCPs managing the second COVID-19 surge. The highest tiers of hospital management urgently need to provide psychological support, peer-support groups, and a communication structure that ensure the well-being of HCPs.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Critical Care , Depression/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health , Physicians/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/etiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/etiology , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prevalence
9.
Ann Intensive Care ; 11(1): 87, 2021 May 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247600

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Dexamethasone decreases mortality in patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and has become the standard of care during the second wave of pandemic. Dexamethasone is an immunosuppressive treatment potentially increasing the risk of secondary hospital acquired infections in critically ill patients. We conducted an observational retrospective study in three French intensive care units (ICUs) comparing the first and second waves of pandemic to investigate the role of dexamethasone in the occurrence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and blood stream infections (BSI). Patients admitted from March to November 2020 with a documented COVID-19 and requiring mechanical ventilation (MV) for ≥ 48 h were included. The main study outcomes were the incidence of VAP and BSI according to the use of dexamethasone. Secondary outcomes were the ventilator-free days (VFD) at day-28 and day-60, ICU and hospital length of stay and mortality. RESULTS: Among the 151 patients included, 84 received dexamethasone, all but one during the second wave. VAP occurred in 63% of patients treated with dexamethasone (DEXA+) and 57% in those not receiving dexamethasone (DEXA-) (p = 0.43). The cumulative incidence of VAP, considering death, duration of MV and late immunosuppression as competing factors was not different between groups (p = 0.59). A multivariate analysis did not identify dexamethasone as an independent risk factor for VAP occurrence. The occurrence of BSI was not different between groups (29 vs. 30%; p = 0.86). DEXA+ patients had more VFD at day-28 (9 (0-21) vs. 0 (0-11) days; p = 0.009) and a reduced ICU length of stay (20 (11-44) vs. 32 (17-46) days; p = 0.01). Mortality did not differ between groups. CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort of COVID-19 patients requiring invasive MV, dexamethasone was not associated with an increased incidence of VAP or BSI. Dexamethasone might not explain the high rates of VAP and BSI observed in critically ill COVID-19 patients.

10.
Eur Respir Rev ; 30(160)2021 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218291

ABSTRACT

Prone positioning reduces mortality in the management of intubated patients with moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. It allows improvement in oxygenation by improving ventilation/perfusion ratio mismatching.Because of its positive physiological effects, prone positioning has also been tested in non-intubated, spontaneously breathing patients, or "awake" prone positioning. This review provides an update on awake prone positioning for hypoxaemic respiratory failure, in both coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and non-COVID-19 patients. In non-COVID-19 acute respiratory failure, studies are limited to a few small nonrandomised studies and involved patients with different diseases. However, results have been appealing with regard to oxygenation improvement, especially when combined with noninvasive ventilation or high-flow nasal cannula.The recent COVID-19 pandemic has led to a major increase in hospitalisations for acute respiratory failure. Awake prone positioning has been used with the aim to prevent intensive care unit admission and mechanical ventilation. Prone positioning in conscious, non-intubated COVID-19 patients is used in emergency departments, medical wards and intensive care units.Several trials reported an improvement in oxygenation and respiratory rate during prone positioning, but impacts on clinical outcomes, particularly on intubation rates and survival, remain unclear. Tolerance of prolonged prone positioning is an issue. Larger controlled, randomised studies are underway to provide results concerning clinical benefit and define optimised prone positioning regimens.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Lung/physiopathology , Patient Positioning , Prone Position , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Wakefulness , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Lung/virology , Recovery of Function , Respiration , Respiratory Insufficiency/physiopathology , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology , Treatment Outcome
13.
Blood Adv ; 5(3): 628-634, 2021 02 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1058239

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become one of the biggest public health challenges of this century. Severe forms of the disease are associated with a thrombo-inflammatory state that can turn into thrombosis. Because tissue factor (TF) conveyed by extracellular vesicles (EVs) has been implicated in thrombosis, we quantified the EV-TF activity in a cohort of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 (n = 111) and evaluated its link with inflammation, disease severity, and thrombotic events. Patients with severe disease were compared with those who had moderate disease and with patients who had septic shock not related to COVID-19 (n = 218). The EV-TF activity was notably increased in patients with severe COVID-19 compared with that observed in patients with moderate COVID-19 (median, 231 [25th to 75th percentile, 39-761] vs median, 25 [25th to 75th percentile, 12-59] fM; P < .0001); EV-TF was correlated with leukocytes, D-dimer, and inflammation parameters. High EV-TF values were associated with an increased thrombotic risk in multivariable models. Compared with patients who had septic shock, those with COVID-19 were characterized by a distinct coagulopathy profile with significantly higher EV-TF and EV-fibrinolytic activities that were not counterbalanced by an increase in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Thus, this article is the first to describe the dissemination of extreme levels of EV-TF in patients with severe COVID-19, which supports the international recommendations of systematic preventive anticoagulation in hospitalized patients and potential intensification of anticoagulation in patients with severe disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Thromboplastin/metabolism , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Area Under Curve , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1/metabolism , Proportional Hazards Models , ROC Curve , Risk , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombosis/diagnosis , Thrombosis/etiology
15.
Intensive Care Med ; 46(12): 2385-2396, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-917110

ABSTRACT

In ARDS patients, the change from supine to prone position generates a more even distribution of the gas-tissue ratios along the dependent-nondependent axis and a more homogeneous distribution of lung stress and strain. The change to prone position is generally accompanied by a marked improvement in arterial blood gases, which is mainly due to a better overall ventilation/perfusion matching. Improvement in oxygenation and reduction in mortality are the main reasons to implement prone position in patients with ARDS. The main reason explaining a decreased mortality is less overdistension in non-dependent lung regions and less cyclical opening and closing in dependent lung regions. The only absolute contraindication for implementing prone position is an unstable spinal fracture. The maneuver to change from supine to prone and vice versa requires a skilled team of 4-5 caregivers. The most frequent adverse events are pressure sores and facial edema. Recently, the use of prone position has been extended to non-intubated spontaneously breathing patients affected with COVID-19 ARDS. The effects of this intervention on outcomes are still uncertain.


Subject(s)
Prone Position/physiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Respiratory Mechanics/physiology , Humans , Lung Compliance/drug effects , Lung Compliance/physiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications
16.
Am J Transplant ; 21(4): 1586-1596, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-883239

ABSTRACT

It is unknown if solid organ transplant recipients are at higher risk for severe COVID-19. The management of a lung transplantation (LTx) program and the therapeutic strategies to adapt the immunosuppressive regimen and antiviral measures is a major issue in the COVID-19 era, but little is known about worldwide practice. We sent out to 180 LTx centers worldwide in June 2020 a survey with 63 questions, both regarding the management of a LTx program in the COVID-19 era and the therapeutic strategies to treat COVID-19 LTx recipients. We received a total of 78 responses from 15 countries. Among participants, 81% declared a reduction of the activity and 47% restricted LTx for urgent cases only. Sixteen centers observed deaths on waiting listed patients and eight centers performed LTx for COVID-19 disease. In 62% of the centers, COVID-19 was diagnosed in LTx recipients, most of them not severe cases. The most common immunosuppressive management included a decreased dose or pausing of the cell cycle inhibitors. Remdesivir, hydroxychloroquine, and azithromycin were the most proposed antiviral strategies. Most of the centers have been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic and proposed an active therapeutic strategy to treat LTx recipients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Lung Transplantation , Pandemics , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Risk Factors , Transplant Recipients , Waiting Lists
17.
Ann Intensive Care ; 10(1): 129, 2020 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-810354

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Data on respiratory mechanics of COVID-19 ARDS patients are scarce. Respiratory mechanics and response to positive expiratory pressure (PEEP) may be different in obese and non-obese patients. METHODS: We investigated esophageal pressure allowing determination of transpulmonary pressures (PL ) and elastances (EL) during a decremental PEEP trial from 20 to 6 cm H2O in a cohort of COVID-19 ARDS patients. RESULTS: Fifteen patients were investigated, 8 obese and 7 non-obese patients. PEEP ≥ 16 cm H2O for obese patients and PEEP ≥10 cm H2O for non-obese patients were necessary to obtain positive expiratory PL. Change of PEEP did not alter significantly ΔPL or elastances in obese patients. However, in non-obese patients lung EL  and ΔPL increased significantly with PEEP increase. Chest wall EL was not affected by PEEP variations in both groups.

18.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med ; 202(10): 1388-1398, 2020 11 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-737623

ABSTRACT

Rationale: Frontline healthcare providers (HCPs) during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic are at high risk of mental morbidity.Objectives: To assess the prevalence of symptoms of anxiety, depression, and peritraumatic dissociation in HCPs.Methods: This was a cross-sectional study in 21 ICUs in France between April 20, 2020, and May 21, 2020. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Peritraumatic Dissociative Experience Questionnaire were used. Factors independently associated with reported symptoms of mental health disorders were identified.Measurements and Main Results: The response rate was 67%, with 1,058 respondents (median age 33 yr; 71% women; 68% nursing staff). The prevalence of symptoms of anxiety, depression, and peritraumatic dissociation was 50.4%, 30.4%, and 32%, respectively, with the highest rates in nurses. By multivariable analysis, male sex was independently associated with lower prevalence of symptoms of anxiety, depression, and peritraumatic dissociation (odds ratio of 0.58 [95% confidence interval, 0.42-0.79], 0.57 [95% confidence interval, 0.39-0.82], and 0.49 [95% confidence interval, 0.34-0.72], respectively). HCPs working in non-university-affiliated hospitals and nursing assistants were at high risk of symptoms of anxiety and peritraumatic dissociation. Importantly, we identified the following six modifiable determinants of symptoms of mental health disorders: fear of being infected, inability to rest, inability to care for family, struggling with difficult emotions, regret about the restrictions in visitation policies, and witnessing hasty end-of-life decisions.Conclusions: HCPs experience high levels of psychological burden during the COVID-19 pandemic. Hospitals, ICU directors, and ICU staff must devise strategies to overcome the modifiable determinants of adverse mental illness symptoms.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Depression/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Stress Disorders, Traumatic/epidemiology , Adult , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Critical Care/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , France , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
J Infect Dis ; 222(11): 1789-1793, 2020 Nov 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-722491

ABSTRACT

Beside the commonly described pulmonary expression of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), major vascular events have been reported. The objective of this study was to investigate whether increased levels of circulating endothelial cells (CECs) might be associated with severe forms of COVID-19. Ninety-nine patients with COVID-19 were enrolled in this retrospective study. Patients in the intensive care units (ICU) had significantly higher CEC counts than non-ICU patients and the extent of endothelial injury was correlated with putative markers of disease severity and inflammatory cytokines. Together, these data provide in vivo evidence that endothelial injury is a key feature of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Endothelium, Vascular/pathology , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/analysis , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Cell Adhesion/physiology , Endothelium, Vascular/virology , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
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