Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 4 de 4
Filter
1.
Journal of Risk and Financial Management ; 16(4):211, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2304710

ABSTRACT

The role of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) cannot be ignored in today's era of working. Its effects are studied in several sectors by various researchers. This study covers the impact of ICT on the profitability of banks. Thirty-three banks are operating in India. A sample period of 10 years (2010 to 2019) was studied. The study also provides insight into how ICT helps the banks' profitability during and post-COVID-19. A panel data analysis is performed to estimate the results. This study found that ICT adversely impacts banks' profitability (NIM) in India in a linear association. However, the quadratic association indicates a positive U-curved relationship between ICT and profitability. In addition, the Net of Non-Performing Assets significantly but negatively impacts the connectivity of ICT and profitability. The findings imply that banks should invest in ICT to maximize the long run. The findings have no significant implication on all stakeholders, including policymakers, shareholders, and managers, to consider implementing ICT tools as an essential factor in enhancing a bank's profitability in the long run. In addition, the level of otherwise lowered investments in ICT cannot be a fruitful step. The current study augments the existing literature on banking by providing novel evidence on the association of ICT with profitability under the influence of NPA. This study argues for the application of ICT in banks in order to increase their profitability. ICT helps the bank maintain transparency, accountability, and even the reach of financial services increases. This situation again leads to the enhancement of the country's economy.

2.
Cureus ; 14(6), 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1940040

ABSTRACT

Background and objective Several studies have indicated an escalation in the stress and anxiety levels among all sections of the population at large during the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. In this challenging environment, meditation or yoga can help in maintaining the quality of life. This pilot study aimed to assess the willingness to practice meditation as a tool to manage anxiety, perceived stress levels, and psychological well-being (quality of life) during the COVID-19 pandemic in India. Materials and methods Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models were employed to characterize the attitude of healthy Indian adults toward meditation as a stress management tool and its impact on psychological well-being. Primary data of 241 participants were collected using Google Forms circulated via email and social media platforms through the snowball sampling technique. The self-reported data on four different psychosocial scales, viz., for anxiety measurement [the Seven-Item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7) and Coronavirus Anxiety Scale (CAS)], for stress measurement [Perceived Stress Scale (PSS)], and to quantify well-being levels [the Five-Item World Health Organization Well-Being Index (WHO-5)], along with those on their perception toward meditation were obtained. Results Our findings suggest that the anxiety and perceived stress scores are lower among those practicing some form of relaxation or meditation than those not practicing it, along with those who already report better psychological well-being and perceived stress. The bivariate results indicated that willingness to meditate among those who were practicing some form of meditation and those not mediating significantly differed based on their age, presence of comorbidities, and GAD and PSS levels. The multivariate logistic regression showed that only those individuals aged 35 years and above and those who have some comorbidity symptoms showed a significant level of willingness to opt for meditation. Conclusions In order to attain proper relief from psychological issues during a pandemic situation such as the current one, a more specific remedial module for meditation procedure needs to be devised as an intervention, and it should be kept in mind that age and comorbidity status also play a significant role with respect to individuals' attitude toward meditation as a tool for psychological relief.

3.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257429, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440987

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has brought to light the lacunae in the preparedness of healthcare systems across the globe. This preparedness also includes the safety of healthcare providers (HCPs) at various levels. Sudden spread of COVID-19 infection has created threatening and vulnerable conditions for the HCPs. The current pandemic situation has not only affected physical health of HCPs but also their mental health. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to understand the prevalence and severity of secondary traumatic stress, optimism parameters, along with states of mood experienced by the HCPs, viz., doctors, nurses and allied healthcare professionals (including Physiotherapist, Lab technicians, Phlebotomist, dieticians, administrative staff and clinical pharmacist), during the COVID-19 lockdown in India. METHODOLOGY: The assessment of level of secondary traumatic stress (STS), optimism/pessimism (via Life Orientation Test-Revised) and current mood states experienced by Indian HCPs in the present COVID-19 pandemic situation was done using a primary data of 2,008 HCPs from India during the first lockdown during April-May 2020. Data was collected through snow-ball sampling technique, reaching out to various medical health care professionals through social media platforms. RESULT: Amongst the study sample 88.2% of doctors, 79.2 of nurses and 58.6% of allied HCPs were found to have STS in varying severity. There was a female preponderance in the category of Severe STS. Higher optimism on the LOTR scale was observed among doctors at 39.3% followed by nurses at 26.7% and allied health care professionals 22.8%. The mood visual analogue scale which measures the "mood" during the survey indicated moderate mood states without any gender bias in the study sample. CONCLUSION: The current investigation sheds light on the magnitude of the STSS experienced by the HCPs in the Indian Subcontinent during the pandemic. This hitherto undiagnosed and unaddressed issue, calls for a dire need of creating better and accessible mental health programmes and facilities for the health care providers in India.


Subject(s)
Compassion Fatigue/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Optimism/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Compassion Fatigue/epidemiology , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Mental Health , Pandemics , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Sci Total Environ ; 759: 144274, 2021 Mar 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-968606

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has reemphasized the indispensable role of plastics in our daily life. Plastics in terms of personal protective equipment (PPEs) and other single-use medical equipment along with packaging solutions owing to their inherent properties have emerged as a life-savior for protecting the health and safety of the frontline health workers and the common citizens during the pandemic. However, plastics have been deemed as evil polluter due to their indiscriminate littering and mismanagement amid increased plastic usage and waste generation during this unprecedented crisis. This article reviews and assesses to dwell upon whether plastics in the time of pandemic are acting as protector of the public health or polluter of the environment. Considering the utilities and limitations of plastic along with its management or mismanagement, and the fate, an equitable appraisal suggests that the consumers' irresponsible behavior, and attitude and poor awareness, and the stress on waste management infrastructure in terms of collection, operation, and financial constraints as the major drivers, leading to mismanagement, turn plastic into an evil polluter of the environment. Plastic can be a protector if managed properly and complemented by the circular economy strategies in terms of reduction, recycle and recovery, and thereby preventing leakage into the environment. To safeguard the supply chain of PPEs, several decontamination techniques have been adopted worldwide ensuring their effective reprocessing to prioritize the circular economy within the system. Policy guidelines encouraging to adopt safer practices and sustainable technical solutions along with consumers' education for awareness creation are the need of the hour for preventing plastic to turn from protector with high utility to polluter.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Personal Protective Equipment , Plastics , Recycling , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL