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1.
Transportation research record ; 2677(4):448-462, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2318008

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically altered people's travel behavior, in particular outdoor activities, including walking. Their behavior changes may have prolonged effects after the pandemic, and such changes vary by the context and are related to the characteristics of the built environment. But empirical studies about the relationships between pedestrians and the built environment during the pandemic are lacking. This study explores how COVID-19 and related travel restrictions have affected the relationship between pedestrian traffic volume and the built environment. We estimate daily pedestrian volumes for all signalized intersections in Salt Lake County, Utah, U.S.A., from pedestrian push-button log data between January 2019 and October 2020. Multilevel spatial filtering models show that the COVID-19 pandemic has altered the relationship between pedestrian traffic volume and the built environment. During the pandemic, the higher the number of COVID-19 cases, the less (or more negative) the effects of density, street connectivity, and destination accessibility on pedestrian volume being observed. The exception is access to urban parks, as it became more significant in increasing pedestrian activities during the pandemic. The models also highlight the negative impacts of the pandemic in economically disadvantaged areas. Our findings could help urban and transportation planners find effective interventions to promote active transportation and physical activity amid the global pandemic.

2.
Transp Res Rec ; 2677(4): 448-462, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2318009

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically altered people's travel behavior, in particular outdoor activities, including walking. Their behavior changes may have prolonged effects after the pandemic, and such changes vary by the context and are related to the characteristics of the built environment. But empirical studies about the relationships between pedestrians and the built environment during the pandemic are lacking. This study explores how COVID-19 and related travel restrictions have affected the relationship between pedestrian traffic volume and the built environment. We estimate daily pedestrian volumes for all signalized intersections in Salt Lake County, Utah, U.S.A., from pedestrian push-button log data between January 2019 and October 2020. Multilevel spatial filtering models show that the COVID-19 pandemic has altered the relationship between pedestrian traffic volume and the built environment. During the pandemic, the higher the number of COVID-19 cases, the less (or more negative) the effects of density, street connectivity, and destination accessibility on pedestrian volume being observed. The exception is access to urban parks, as it became more significant in increasing pedestrian activities during the pandemic. The models also highlight the negative impacts of the pandemic in economically disadvantaged areas. Our findings could help urban and transportation planners find effective interventions to promote active transportation and physical activity amid the global pandemic.

3.
Transp Res Part A Policy Pract ; 2021 Dec 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2301511

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic response has had a significant impact on the general population's ability to participate in their communities. Individuals with disabilities, an already socially disadvantaged population, are more vulnerable to and have likely been disproportionately impacted by COVID-19 response conditions. Yet, the extent to which daily community living activities of people with disabilities have been impacted is unknown. Thus, this study assesses their travel behavior and community living during the COVID-19 pandemic conditions compared with those of the general population during the same period. A web survey was conducted using Qualtrics's online panel data (respondents included 232 people with disabilities and 161 people without disabilities). Regression models found that people with disabilities reduced their daily travel to a greater extent but at varying degrees, depending on the destination types and travel modes. Reductions in taxi rides (including ride-hailing services) were most significant among people with cognitive and sensory (vision and hearing) disabilities. By place type, cognitive disability was associated with a trip reduction for multiple destination types-grocery, restaurants, outdoor recreation, indoor recreation, and healthcare providers. Findings from this study could contribute to decision- and policy-making in planning, transportation, and community services during the remainder of the COVID-19 pandemic, in future major public health crises, as well as post-COVID, because the adjustments in travel behavior and community living might be longer-term.

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