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1.
7th International Conference on Higher Education Advances (Head'21) ; : 289-296, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2123995

ABSTRACT

Online teaching has grown exponentially as a result of COVID-19. Universities and teaching institutions the world over have had to adapt their curricula to this new teaching and learning model. The main goal of this study is to analyse various teaching methodologies used on a sample of university students to analyse their effectiveness in terms of satisfaction, competencies and academic performance. The results suggest that methodologies that include greater student-teacher interaction or the use of videoconferencing for classes and problem-solving help to raise student satisfaction. Students also positively assess online teaching as it allows them to acquire new competencies and even to identify business opportunities. The online evaluation method used also seems to have been appropriate, as it led students to obtain better grades than in face-to-face teaching contexts. The study offers several implications for university teachers of Social Sciences who wish to adopt this type of teaching method.

2.
Neurology ; 98(18 SUPPL), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1925439

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate clinical, laboratory, and epidemiological features of acute neuroinflammatory disorders (ANIDs) that followed the 2016 Zika epidemic in Colombia. Background: The outbreak of Zika virus infection in Colombia in 2015-2016, produced an increased incidence of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) and other ANID cases. The Neuroviruses Emerging in the Americas Study (NEAS) network was established in 2016 as a multicenter-based observatory of ANIDs to investigate the role of emerging pathogens in neuroinflammatory diseases. Design/Methods: NEAS serves as a multi-center study based on 13 hospitals in 7 cities in Colombia which study all newly diagnosed patients who fulfill established criteria for GBS, encephalitis, myelitis, meningoencephalitis, or cranial nerve disorders as part of an observational cohort. We analyzed the clinical and epidemiological features of all cases evaluated between January 2016 and September 2021. Results: An observational cohort of 825 patients with ANIDs were recruited during the study period. 58.8% of cases were male with a median age of 43 (IQR 25-58) years. The most frequent ANIDs were GBS (46.1%) and facial nerve palsy (28.7%). The diagnosis of encephalitis (9.5%), myelitis (6.5%), and optic neuritis (5.9%) were less frequent. Patients with GBS were predominantly male (70.6%) and had a median age of 49 (IQR 32-60) years. Interestingly, there was an increase incidence of GBS in 2019. Conclusions: The outbreak of Zika in Colombia produced a marked increase in the incidence of GBS in 2016. Although cases of GBS and other ANIDs continued to emerge after the incidence of Zika infection decreased in July 2016, the recent SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has not produced any significant increase in the incidence of GBS in Colombia.

3.
Gastroenterology ; 160(6):S-160, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1597728

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims: Digestive symptoms are common in patients with COVID-19. Neverthe-less, the evidence available so far is based on retrospective and observational studies. This prospective multicenter cohort study aimed to describe the frequency, intensity, evolution, and impact of digestive symptoms and complications, during hospitalization and after dis-charge, of patients with COVID-19. Methods: Patients hospitalized due to COVID-19 (posi-tive PCR for SARS-CoV-2) from May to August 2020, were prospectively recruited in 31 centers. Follow-up included the period between admission and 15 days after discharge. Results: 829 patients (mean age 56.7±17.9 years;42% of females) were enrolled in this study. Of these, 7.2% were active smokers and the mean BMI was 29.1±5.7. Proton pump inhibitors were used by 21.5% (n=178). The most prevalent symptoms on admission were diarrhea (39.4%), nausea (27.4%), and abdominal pain (20.7%). Anorexia, a non-specific symptom, was present in 49.8% of hospitalized patients. At discharge and 15 days after discharge, most symptoms resolved, returning to the baseline prevalence of patients (<5%). Digestive complications during admission were infrequent, except for liver injury defined as hypertransaminasemia which was present in 267 patients (32.3%). The mean length of hospital stay was 8 days (5-12) and 13.6% needed ICU admission. Death happened in 5.2%of patients. On multivariate analysis, diarrhea on admission was associated with a shorter hospital stay (<10 days) ORa 0.508 (0.350-0.739) p=0.000. During hospitalization, diarrhea, constipation, and abdominal bloating were associated with shorter hospital stay ORa 0.531 (0.298-0.946) p=0.032, ORa 0.384 (0.167-0.885) p=0.025, ORa 0.163 (0.057-0.466) p= 0.00, respectively.Odynophagia and dysphagia during hospitalization were associated with a higher need for ICU admission, ORa 6.518 (2.255-18.835) p=0.001 and ORa 4.035 (1.453-11.204) p=0.007, respectively. Liver injury during hospitalization was associated with a higher hospital stay (>10 days) ORa 1.442 (1.019-2.041) p=0.039. In the linear regression analysis, the set of GI symptoms and complications, along with age, comorbidity, and respiratory symptoms, were able to predict 43% (R2 0.43) of the observed variability in the speed of ICU admission;in this case, digestive symptoms slowed it down (more days until ICU admission). Conclusions: Gastrointestinal manifestations of COVID-19 are common in hospitalized patients, while complications are infrequent. Gastrointestinal symptoms seemed to predict a shorter hospital stay and slower speed of ICU admission. These tend to resolve to their baseline prevalence 15 days after discharge, while elevated transaminases were associated with a longer hospital stay. Odynophagia and dysphagia during hospitaliza-tion were associated with an increased need for ICU admission.

4.
Gastroenterology ; 160(6):S-320-S-321, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1597391

ABSTRACT

Background: A minimum of physical activity and low liquid intake are factors that havebeen associated with constipation. The health emergency brought on by the COVID-19pandemic has resulted in adopting behavior, such as sheltering-in-place (less mobility) anddietary changes, creating a scenario we believe to be an adequate model for examining theappearance of symptoms of constipation and its associated factors. At present, there are no reports in the literature that establish a relation between a change in bowel movement habitand being under the current lockdown. Thus, the aim of our study was to evaluate theincidence of symptoms of constipation and associated factors during the lockdown implementedto contain the spread of COVID-19 in Mexico.Methods: A cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted on an open population,applying an electronic survey (4 weeks after lockdown due to COVID-19 in Mexico) toevaluate: demographic characteristics, physical activity, water and fiber intake, appearanceof constipation symptoms (including stool consistency), and quality of life. Incidence (newcases) of constipation after the lockdown (“new-onset” constipation) was calculated and the95% CI was reported. A comparative analysis of the categorical variables and continuousvariables was carried out between the participants with “new-onset” constipation and thosewith no constipation during the lockdown, utilizing the Student’s t test, the Mann-WhitneyU test, the chi-square test, or the Wilcoxon test, as appropriate. Statistical significance wasset a p < 0.05.Results: Out of 678 subjects evaluated, 170 (25%, 95% CI 21.7-28.4) developed symptomsof “new-onset” constipation, with a significant decrease in the number of daily bowelmovements (p<0.05) and stool consistency (p<0.05) during lockdown (Figure 1). Furthermore,in the “new-onset” constipation population, there was a higher proportion of subjects(48%) who stopped exercising during the pandemic compared to the subjects who did notdevelop constipation symptoms (29%, p=0.0005, OR 2.23, CI 95% 1.4-3.48, Figure 2).The multivariate analysis (logistic regression) showed that female sex (p=0.001), water intake(p=0.039), and physical activity (p=0.012) were associated with “new-onset” constipation.Conclusions: In conclusion, in our study we found that one-fourth of the population thatreduced their physical activity and drank less water due to mobility restrictions imposedfor epidemiologic reasons, in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, developed “new-onset”constipation symptoms. Given those results, appropriate physical activity and adequateliquid intake during prolonged periods of lockdown should be recommended to preventsaid symptoms.(Image Presented)Number of bowel movements, days of physical activity and stool consistency before and after the lockdown(Image Presented)Percentage of subjects who stop physical activity during the pandemic among groups.

5.
United European Gastroenterology Journal ; 9(SUPPL 8):884-885, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1490984

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The global spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus has resulted in a worldwide pandemic with important socio-health repercussions. Current clinical experience and several published retrospective studies suggest that digestive symptoms are common in infected patients. [1][2] The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and complications in patients with COVID-19 disease managed on an outpatient basis. Aims & Methods: International, multicenter, prospective cohort study was conducted in 18 centers from Latin America, Asia, Africa and Europe. Subjects ≥18 years old, with COVID-19 disease, managed on an outpatient basis were included. Followed up period was 6 months. Baseline characteristics, comorbidities, GI symptoms or complications, hospital admission, ICU admission and mortality data were collected. A descriptive analysis of the study results was performed. A multivariate analysis was carried out, evaluating the association of GI symptoms and complications with age, baseline characteristics, comorbidity and COVID-19 treatments received. The adjusted Odd Ratio (ORa) was calculated assuming a significance level of p <0.05. Results: The preliminary analysis included a total of 436 patients. The median age was 35 years, interquartile range (IQR) 27-48 years. Two hundred and ten patients (48.2%) were male. The median of age-adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index was 0 (IQR 0-1). The most frequent GI symptoms were anorexia 216 (49.5%), diarrhea 207 (47.5%), nausea 134 (30.7%), abdominal pain 122 (28%) and abdominal distension 121 (27.8%). At 4-week follow- up, symptoms resolved in most cases. Multivariate analysis showed that nausea was associated with Ivermectin treatment ORa 3.24 (95% CI 1.11-9.43) p= 0.030;abdominal pain was associated with Hydroxychloroquine treatment ORa 5.27 (95% CI 1.52-18.19) p= 0.009;diarrhea was associated with age ORa 0.966 (95% CI 0.93-0.99), p= 0.020 and Hydroxychloroquine treatment ORa 6.9 (95% CI 1.55-30.79), p= 0. 011;abdominal distension was associated with body mass index ORa 1.147 (95% CI 1.05-1.24), p< 0.001 and Hydroxychloroquine treatment ORa 7.6 (95% CI 2.00-29.51), p= 0.003. Digestive complications were infrequent (1 gastritis, 2 duodenitis, 1 jejunal ulcer, 3 hypertransaminasemia, 1 enteritis, 1 colitis). Twenty-three patients (5.3%) required hospital admission, of whom 4 (0.9%) required ICU admission and 2 (0.5%) died. Conclusion: Anorexia, diarrhea, nausea, abdominal pain and abdominal bloating were common symptoms in patients with COVID-19 disease managed on an outpatient basis. GI complications were infrequent in patients with COVID-19 who do not require hospitalization. Treatment with Hydroxychloroquine and Ivermectin was associated with more GI symptoms in COVID-19 outpatients.

6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(23)2020 12 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389353

ABSTRACT

This is a mixed-methods research study carried out on a cohort of airport workers during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. We used quantitative and qualitative methods to describe the infection and risk perception of SARS-CoV-2 in a cohort of workers at the International Airport El Dorado/Luis Carlos Galán Sarmiento in Bogotá, Colombia. An incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection of 7.9% was found in the workers. A high perception of risk was associated with activities such as using public transport. Risk perception is strongly influenced by practices related to work conditions and environments. These findings could help us understand the pandemic's dynamics and the conceptions of the risk of transmission to promote policies on health and safety in this group of workers.


Subject(s)
Airports , COVID-19/epidemiology , Risk Assessment , Adult , Colombia/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Infectio ; 25(3): 176-181, jul.-set. 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1055380

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective: To determine the mortality and survival of COVID-19 cases in Colombia between March and July 2020. Materials and methods: A retrospective cohort study in the Colombian population between March 6 to July 8, 2020, with the data reported to the National Institute of Health. Survival analysis was performed considering the real-time PCR results, died or recovered, the onset of symptoms until the date of death, or the final time of the cohort. The actuarial variation and Long-Rank test were applied for survival. Risk factors were determined by Cox regression. Results: The overall survival rate was 100%, 98%, 97%, and 95% for day 1, 10, 20 and 30, respectively. Differences were found in survival in age, sex, region, and hospitaliza tion time spending (p <0.01), the 30-day survival rate was 96% and 95% for females and males, respectively. The region with the highest survival was Antioquia with 99% and the lower Barranquilla with 93%. The age group with the lowest survival was ≥80 years of age with 60%, and being hospitalized represented a survival rate of 68%. Conclusions: This study is one of the first to estimate survival in the Colombian population diagnosed with COVID-19.


Resumen Objetivo: determinar la mortalidad y supervivencia de casos de COVID-19 en Colombia entre marzo y julio de 2020. Materiales y métodos: Estudio de cohorte retrospectivo en población colombiana entre el 6 de marzo al 8 de julio de 2020, con los datos reportados al Instituto Nacional de Salud. El análisis de supervivencia se realizó considerando los resultados de la PCR en tiempo real, fallecido o recuperado, el inicio de los síntomas hasta la fecha del fallecimiento o el momento final de la cohorte. Para la supervivencia se aplicó la variación actuarial y la prueba de rango largo. Los factores de riesgo se determinaron mediante regresión de Cox. Resultados: La tasa de supervivencia general fue del 100%, 98%, 97% y 95% para los días 1, 10, 20 y 30, respectivamente. Se encontraron diferencias en la su pervivencia en cuanto a edad, sexo, región y tiempo de hospitalización (p <0,01), la tasa de supervivencia a 30 días fue del 96% y 95% para mujeres y hombres, respectivamente. La región con mayor supervivencia fue Antioquia con 99% y la Baja Barranquilla con 93%. El grupo de edad con menor supervivencia fue el ≥80 años con 60%, y la hospitalización representó una tasa de supervivencia del 68%. Conclusiones: Este estudio es uno de los primeros en estimar la supervivencia en la población colombiana diagnosticada con COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Infant , Child, Preschool , Child , Adolescent , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Survival Analysis , COVID-19 , Survival Rate , Risk Factors , Cohort Studies , Mortality , Colombia , Survivorship , Methods
10.
J Virol Methods ; 285: 113960, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-726675

ABSTRACT

The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared a pandemic caused by a new coronavirus named SARS-CoV-2. The growing demand for commercial kits used for automated extraction of SARS-CoV-2 RNA, a key step before rRT-PCR diagnosis, could cause a shortage of stocks that hinders the rapid processing of samples. Although the recommendation is to use automated methods for nucleic acid extraction, alternatives are necessary to replace commercial kits. However, these alternatives should be as reliable as automated methods. This work describes a simple method to detect SARS-CoV-2 from specimens collected in different preservation media. Samples were previously inactivated by heating and precipitating with a PEG/NaCl solution before rRT-PCR assays for Orf1ab, N and S genes. The new method was compared with an automated protocol of nucleic acid extraction. Both procedures showed similar analytical results. Consequently, this simple and inexpensive method is a suitable procedure for laboratory diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/standards , Genes, Viral , Humans , Pandemics , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , SARS-CoV-2
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