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1.
Cell Rep Med ; 3(7): 100693, 2022 Jul 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1946857

ABSTRACT

The global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has claimed more than 5 million lives. Emerging variants of concern (VOCs) continually challenge viral control. Directing vaccine-induced humoral and cell-mediated responses to mucosal surfaces may enhance vaccine efficacy. Here we investigate the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of optimized synthetic DNA plasmids encoding wild-type severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) spike protein (pS) co-formulated with the plasmid-encoded mucosal chemokine cutaneous T cell-attracting chemokine (pCTACK; CCL27). pCTACK-co-immunized animals exhibit increased spike-specific antibodies at the mucosal surface and increased frequencies of interferon gamma (IFNγ)+ CD8+ T cells in the respiratory mucosa. pCTACK co-immunization confers 100% protection from heterologous Delta VOC challenge. This study shows that mucosal chemokine adjuvants can direct vaccine-induced responses to specific immunological sites and have significant effects on heterologous challenge. Further study of this unique chemokine-adjuvanted vaccine approach in the context of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines is likely important.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Viral Vaccines , Adjuvants, Immunologic/pharmacology , Animals , Antibodies, Viral , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Chemokines , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Vaccines/genetics
2.
Vaccine ; 40(21): 2960-2969, 2022 05 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1773836

ABSTRACT

The enhanced transmissibility and immune evasion associated with emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants demands the development of next-generation vaccines capable of inducing superior protection amid a shifting pandemic landscape. Since a portion of the global population harbors some level of immunity from vaccines based on the original Wuhan-Hu-1 SARS-CoV-2 sequence or natural infection, an important question going forward is whether this immunity can be boosted by next-generation vaccines that target emerging variants while simultaneously maintaining long-term protection against existing strains. Here, we evaluated the immunogenicity of INO-4800, our synthetic DNA vaccine candidate for COVID-19 currently in clinical evaluation, and INO-4802, a next-generation DNA vaccine designed to broadly target emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants, as booster vaccines in nonhuman primates. Rhesus macaques primed over one year prior with the first-generation INO-4800 vaccine were boosted with either INO-4800 or INO-4802 in homologous or heterologous prime-boost regimens. Both boosting schedules led to an expansion of T cells and antibody responses which were characterized by improved neutralizing and ACE2 blocking activity across wild-type SARS-CoV-2 as well as multiple variants of concern. These data illustrate the durability of immunity following vaccination with INO-4800 and additionally support the use of either INO-4800 or INO-4802 in prime-boost regimens.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines, DNA , Viral Vaccines , Animals , Antibody Formation , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Macaca mulatta , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
3.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2021 Sep 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1706795

ABSTRACT

Among 9,048 people infected with SARS-CoV-2 between January-May, 2021 in Maryland, in regression-adjusted analysis, SARS-CoV-2 viruses carrying the spike protein mutation E484K were disproportionately prevalent among persons infected after full vaccination against COVID-19 as compared to infected persons who were not fully vaccinated (aOR 1.96, 95% CI, 1.36 to 2.83).

4.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-321794

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus family member, SARS-CoV-2 has been identified as the causal agent for the outbreak of viral pneumonia disease, COVID-19 which first emerged in mid-December 2019 in the city of Wuhan in central China. As of February 25, 2020 there are 80,994 people infected and 2,760 deaths, and documented human-to-human transmission across multiple continents. At this time, no vaccine is available to control further dissemination of the disease. We have previously developed a synthetic DNA vaccine targeting the MERS coronavirus Spike (S) protein that was deployed in response to the MERS outbreak in South Korea. This vaccine induced potent antibody and CTL responses, and provided protection in a NHP challenge model. In the clinic, the vaccine generated humoral immunity including neutralizing antibody responses, as well as T cell immunity. Here we build on this prior work and report on the rapid development of a synthetic DNA-based vaccine targeting the major surface antigen Spike protein of SARS-CoV-2. The engineered construct, INO-4800 induced robust expression of the Spike protein in vitro, and generated antibody and T cell responses following a single immunization in mice and guinea pigs. This preliminary dataset identifies INO-4800 as a potential COVID-19 vaccine candidate, supporting further study for mobilization against this emerging disease threat.

5.
J Affect Disord ; 300: 571-585, 2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1670638

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, many have experienced drastic changes in their academic and social lives with ensuing consequences towards their physical and mental well-being. The purpose of this systematic review is to identify virtual mindfulness-based interventions for the well-being of adults aged 19 to 40 years in developed countries and examine the efficacy of these techniques/exercises. METHODS: This mixed-methods systematic review follows the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines with a registered PROSPERO protocol. With a convergent integrated synthesis approach, IEEE Xplore, PsychInfo, Web of Science and OVID were searched with a predetermined criteria and search strategy employing booleans and filters for peer-reviewed and gray literature. Data screening and extraction were independently performed by two authors, with a third author settling disagreements after reconciliation. Study quality of selected articles was assessed with two independent authors using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool (MMAT). Studies were analyzed qualitatively (precluding meta and statistical analysis) due to the heterogeneous study results from diverse study designs in present literature. RESULTS: Common mindfulness-based interventions used in the appraised studies included practicing basic mindfulness, Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) programs, Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy programs (MBCT) and the Learning 2 BREATHE (L2B) program. CONCLUSION: Studies implementing mindfulness interventions demonstrated an overall improvement in well-being. Modified versions of these interventions can be implemented in a virtual context, so adults can improve their well-being through an accessible format.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Mindfulness , Adult , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
6.
Cell Rep ; 38(5): 110318, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1654152

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccines may target epitopes that reduce durability or increase the potential for escape from vaccine-induced immunity. Using synthetic vaccinology, we have developed rationally immune-focused SARS-CoV-2 Spike-based vaccines. Glycans can be employed to alter antibody responses to infection and vaccines. Utilizing computational modeling and in vitro screening, we have incorporated glycans into the receptor-binding domain (RBD) and assessed antigenic profiles. We demonstrate that glycan-coated RBD immunogens elicit stronger neutralizing antibodies and have engineered seven multivalent configurations. Advanced DNA delivery of engineered nanoparticle vaccines rapidly elicits potent neutralizing antibodies in guinea pigs, hamsters, and multiple mouse models, including human ACE2 and human antibody repertoire transgenics. RBD nanoparticles induce high levels of cross-neutralizing antibodies against variants of concern with durable titers beyond 6 months. Single, low-dose immunization protects against a lethal SARS-CoV-2 challenge. Single-dose coronavirus vaccines via DNA-launched nanoparticles provide a platform for rapid clinical translation of potent and durable coronavirus vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Nanoparticles/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Binding Sites , COVID-19 Vaccines/chemistry , COVID-19 Vaccines/genetics , Cricetinae , Epitopes , Guinea Pigs , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Mice , Nanoparticles/chemistry , Nucleic Acid-Based Vaccines/administration & dosage , Nucleic Acid-Based Vaccines/chemistry , Nucleic Acid-Based Vaccines/genetics , Nucleic Acid-Based Vaccines/immunology , Polysaccharides/chemistry , Polysaccharides/genetics , Polysaccharides/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccine Potency
7.
Front Med Technol ; 2: 571030, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1639212

ABSTRACT

DNA vaccines are considered as a third-generation vaccination approach in which antigenic materials are encoded as DNA plasmids for direct in vivo production to elicit adaptive immunity. As compared to other platforms, DNA vaccination is considered to have a strong safety profile, as DNA plasmids neither replicate nor elicit vector-directed immune responses in hosts. While earlier work found the immune responses induced by DNA vaccines to be sub-optimal in larger mammals and humans, recent developments in key synthetic DNA and electroporation delivery technologies have now allowed DNA vaccines to elicit significantly more potent and consistent responses in several clinical studies. This paper will review findings from the recent clinical and preclinical studies on DNA vaccines targeting emerging infectious diseases (EID) including COVID-19 caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, and the technological advancements pivotal to the improved responses-including the use of the advanced delivery technology, DNA-encoded cytokine/mucosal adjuvants, and innovative concepts in immunogen design. With continuous advancement over the past three decades, the DNA approach is now poised to develop vaccines against COVID-19, as well as other EIDs.

9.
Open forum infectious diseases ; 8(Suppl 1):387-388, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1564905

ABSTRACT

Background DNA vaccines are safe, tolerable, elicit humoral and cellular responses, allow for repeated dosing over time, are thermostable at room temperature, and are easy to manufacture. We present a compilation of Phase 1 and Phase 2 data of Inovio’s US COVID-19 DNA Vaccine (INO-4800) targeting the full-length Spike antigen of SARS-CoV-2. A South Korean Phase 2 study is ongoing. Methods Participants in the open-label Phase 1 trial received 0.5 mg, 1.0 mg or 2.0 mg intradermally (ID) followed by electroporation (EP) at Days 0 and 28. An optional booster dose was administered >6 months post-dose 2. The Phase 2 further compared the 1.0 mg and 2.0 mg doses against placebo in a total of 401 participants randomized at a 3:3:1:1 ratio. ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT04336410 and NCT04642638 Results The majority of adverse events (AEs) related to INO-4800 across both trials were mild in severity and did not increase in frequency with age and subsequent doses. In Phase 1, 78% (14/18) and 84% (16/19) of subjects generated neutralizing antibody responses with geometric mean titers (GMTs) of 17.4 (95%CI 8.3, 36.5) and 62.3 (95% CI 36.4, 106.7) in the 1.0 and 2.0 groups, respectively (Figure 1). By week 8, 74% (14/19) and 100% (19/19) subjects generated T cell responses by Th1- associated IFNγ ELISPOT assay . Following a booster dose, neutralizing GMTs rose to 82.2 (95% CI 38.2, 176.9) and 124.7 (95% CI 62.8, 247.7) in the 1.0 mg and 2.0 mg groups, respectively, demonstrating the ability of INO-4800 to boost (Figure 2). In Phase 2, neutralizing antibody responses demonstrated GMTs of 93.6 (95%CI 77.3, 113.4) in the 1.0 mg dose group and 150.6 (95%CI 123.8, 183.1) in the 2.0 mg dose group (Figure 3). Conclusion INO-4800 appears safe and tolerable as a primary series and as a booster with the induction of both humoral and cellular immune responses. In addition to eliciting neutralizing antibodies, INO-4800 also induced T cell immune responses as demonstrated by IFNγ ELISpot. Finally, as a homologous booster, INO-4800, when administered 6-10.5 months following the primary series, resulted in an increased immune response without increase in reactogenicity. The 2.0 mg dose was selected for Phase 3 evaluation. Disclosures Joseph Agnes, PhD, Inovio (Employee, Shareholder) Mary Giffear, BS, Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Employee) Kimberly A. Kraynyak, PhD, Inovio Pharmaceuticals (Employee, Other Financial or Material Support, Stock options) Dinah Amante, BS, Inovio (Employee) Emma Reuschel, PhD, Inovio Pharmaceuticals (Employee) Aaron Christensen-Quick, PhD, Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc (Employee) Viviane M. Andrade, PhD, Inovio Pharmaceuticals Inc. (Employee) Gabriella Garufi, PhD, Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Employee) Albert Sylvester, MS, Inovio (Employee, Shareholder) Matthew P. Morrow, PhD, Inovio Pharmaceuticals (Employee) Patrick P. Pezzoli, BS, Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Employee) Jan Pawlicki, PhD, Inovio Pharmaceuticals (Employee) Elisabeth Gillespie, PhD, Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Employee) Katherine Schultheis, MSc, Inovio Pharmaceuticals (Employee) Hedieh Badie, PhD, INOVIO Pharmaceuticals (Employee) Timothy A. Herring, MPH, Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Employee, Other Financial or Material Support, Own stock in the company) Keiko O. Simon, PhD, Inovio Pharmaceuticals (Employee) Trevor R. F. Smith, PhD, Inovio (Employee, Shareholder) Stephanie Ramos, PhD, Inovio Pharmaceuticals (Employee) Jessica Lee, MPH, Inovio Pharmaceuticals (Employee) Michael Dallas, PhD, Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Employee, Shareholder) Ami Shah Brown, PhD, Abbot Laboratories (Shareholder)IBB Biotech ETF (Shareholder)Inovio Pharmaceuticals (Employee)J & J (Shareholder)Moderna (Shareholder) Jacqueline E. Shea, PhD, Inovio Pharmaceuticals (Employee, Shareholder) J Joseph Kim, PhD, Inovio (Employee) David Weiner, PhD, Inovio (Board Member, Grant/Research Support, Shareholder, I serve on the SAB in addition to the above activities) Kate Broderick, PhD, Inovio (Employee) Trevor Mc ullan, MSc, Inovio (Shareholder) Jean Boyer, PhD, Inovio (Employee) Laurent Humeau, PhD, Inovio Pharmaceuticals (Employee) Mammen P. Mammen Jr., MD, Inovio Pharmaceuticals (Employee)

10.
2021.
Preprint in English | Other preprints | ID: ppcovidwho-296356

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Background With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, students have experienced drastic changes in their academic and social lives with ensuing consequences towards their physical and mental well-being. The purpose of this systematic review is to identify virtual mindfulness-based interventions for the well-being of young adults aged 15 to 40 years in developed countries and examine the efficacy of these techniques/exercises. Methods This mixed-methods systematic review follows the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines with a registered PROSPERO protocol. With a convergent integrated synthesis approach, IEEE Xplore, PsychInfo, Web of Science and OVID were searched with a predetermined criteria and search strategy employing booleans and filters for peer-reviewed and grey literature. Data screening and extraction were independently performed by two authors, with a third author settling disagreements after reconciliation. Study quality of selected articles was assessed with two independent authors using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool (MMAT). Studies were analyzed qualitatively (precluding meta and statistical analysis) due to the heterogeneous study results from diverse study designs in present literature. Results Common mindfulness-based interventions used in the appraised studies included practicing basic mindfulness, Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) programs, Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy programs (MBCT) and the Learning 2 BREATHE (L2B) program. Conclusion Studies implementing mindfulness interventions demonstrated an overall improvement in well-being. Modified versions of these interventions can be implemented in a virtual context, so young adults can improve their well-being through an accessible format.

11.
2021.
Preprint in English | Other preprints | ID: ppcovidwho-294693

ABSTRACT

Background The E484K and L452R amino acid substitutions on the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 are associated with reduced neutralization by antibodies from acquired immunity. This study examines the respective association of these mutations with infection in persons who had previously received a COVID-19 vaccine. Methods Genetic sequences from SARS-CoV-2 specimens collected from Maryland residents and reported to Maryland Department of Health were linked to vaccination history. The prevalence of infections in fully vaccinated persons -- defined as being at least two weeks past receiving the final scheduled dose of a COVID-19 vaccine series -- was compared between infections caused by viruses carrying E484K to those not carrying E484K, and between infections caused by viruses carrying L452R to those not carrying L452R, using logistic regression to adjust for confounding. Results Of 9,048 sequenced SARS-CoV-2 specimens examined, 265 (2.9%) were collected from fully vaccinated persons. In adjusted analysis, the E484K substitution was associated with an increase in the odds of the sequenced specimen being collected from a fully vaccinated person (OR 1.96, 95% CI, 1.36 to 2.83). The L452R mutation was not significantly associated with infections in vaccinated persons (OR 1.07, 95% CI, 0.69 to 1.68). Conclusion Though more than 97% of SARS-CoV-2 infections were in persons who were not fully vaccinated, the E484K mutation was associated with increased odds of SARS-CoV-2 infection in vaccinated persons. Linking vaccination and sequencing data can help identify and estimate the impact SARS-CoV-2 mutations may have on vaccine effectiveness. Summary In viruses sequenced for Maryland’s routine SARS-CoV-2 genomic surveillance, the spike protein amino acid substitution E484K was more prevalent in viruses that infected vaccinated people than in viruses that infected people who were not vaccinated.

12.
Front Nutr ; 8: 747956, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463493

ABSTRACT

An entirely unknown species of coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak occurred in December 2019. COVID-19 has already affected more than 180 million people causing ~3.91 million deaths globally till the end of June 2021. During this emergency, the food nutraceuticals can be a potential therapeutic candidate. Curcumin is the natural and safe bioactive compound of the turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) plant and is known to possess potent anti-microbial and immuno-modulatory properties. This review paper covers the various extraction and quantification techniques of curcumin and its usage to produce functional food. The potential of curcumin in boosting the immune system has also been explored. The review will help develop insight and new knowledge about curcumin's role as an immune-booster and therapeutic agent against COVID-19. The manuscript will also encourage and assist the scientists and researchers who have an association with drug development, pharmacology, functional foods, and nutraceuticals to develop curcumin-based formulations.

13.
Cell Rep Med ; 2(10): 100420, 2021 10 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450242

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, has had a dramatic global impact on public health and social and economic infrastructures. Here, we assess the immunogenicity and anamnestic protective efficacy in rhesus macaques of an intradermal (i.d.)-delivered SARS-CoV-2 spike DNA vaccine, INO-4800, currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Vaccination with INO-4800 induced T cell responses and induced spike antigen and RBD binding antibodies with ADCP and ADCD activity. Sera from the animals neutralized both the D614 and G614 SARS-CoV-2 pseudotype viruses. Several months after vaccination, animals were challenged with SARS-CoV-2 resulting in rapid recall of anti-SARS-CoV-2 spike protein T cell and neutralizing antibody responses. These responses were associated with lower viral loads in the lung. These studies support the immune impact of INO-4800 for inducing both humoral and cellular arms of the adaptive immune system, which are likely important for providing durable protection against COVID-19 disease.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Lung/virology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Female , Injections, Intradermal , Macaca mulatta , Male , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccines, DNA/administration & dosage , Vaccines, DNA/therapeutic use , Viral Load
14.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; : 1-5, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447267

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To identify the impact of universal masking on COVID-19 incidence and putative SARS-CoV-2 transmissions events among children's hospital healthcare workers (HCWs). DESIGN: Quasi-experimental study. SETTING: Single academic free-standing children's hospital. METHODS: We performed whole-genome sequencing of SARS-CoV-2- PCR-positive samples collected from HCWs 3 weeks before and 6 weeks after implementing a universal masking policy. Phylogenetic analyses were performed to identify clusters of clonally related SARS-CoV-2 indicative of putative transmission events. We measured COVID-19 incidence, SARS-CoV-2 test positivity rates, and frequency of putative transmission events before and after the masking policy was implemented. RESULTS: HCW COVID-19 incidence and test positivity declined from 14.3 to 4.3 cases per week, and from 18.4% to 9.0%, respectively. Putative transmission events were only identified prior to universal masking. CONCLUSIONS: A universal masking policy was associated with reductions in HCW COVID-19 infections and occupational acquisition of SARS-CoV-2.

16.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2021 Sep 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1393223

ABSTRACT

Among 9,048 people infected with SARS-CoV-2 between January-May, 2021 in Maryland, in regression-adjusted analysis, SARS-CoV-2 viruses carrying the spike protein mutation E484K were disproportionately prevalent among persons infected after full vaccination against COVID-19 as compared to infected persons who were not fully vaccinated (aOR 1.96, 95% CI, 1.36 to 2.83).

17.
ACS Pharmacol Transl Sci ; 4(4): 1349-1361, 2021 Aug 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1358338

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by the newly emerged human coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Due to the highly contagious nature of SARS-CoV-2, it has infected more than 137 million individuals and caused more than 2.9 million deaths globally as of April 13, 2021. There is an urgent need to develop effective novel therapeutic strategies to treat or prevent this infection. Toward this goal, we focused on the development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against the SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein (SARS-CoV-2 Spike) present on the surface of virus particles as well as virus-infected cells. We isolated anti-SARS-CoV-2 Spike mAbs from animals immunized with a DNA vaccine. We then selected a highly potent set of mAbs against SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein and evaluated each candidate for their expression, target binding affinity, and neutralization potential using complementary ACE2-blocking and pseudovirus neutralization assays. We identified a total of 10 antibodies, which specifically and strongly bound to SARS-CoV-2 Spike, blocked the receptor binding domain (RBD) and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) interaction, and neutralized SARS-CoV-2. Furthermore, the glycomic profile of the antibodies suggested that they have high Fc-mediated effector functions. These antibodies should be further investigated for elucidating the neutralizing epitopes on Spike for the design of next-generation vaccines and for their potential in diagnostic as well as therapeutic utilities against SARS-CoV-2.

18.
mBio ; 12(4): e0047321, 2021 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318003

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is a challenge for ongoing efforts to combat antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) bacterial infections. As we learn more about COVID-19 disease and drug stewardship evolves, there is likely to be a lasting impact of increased use of antimicrobial agents and antibiotics, as well as a lack of consistent access to health care across many populations. Sexually transmitted infections have been underreported during the pandemic and are often caused by some of the most drug-resistant pathogens. In their recent article in mBio, Parzych et al. (E. M. Parzych, S. Gulati, B. Zheng, M. A. Bah, et al., mBio 12:e00242-21, 2021, https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.00242-21) focus on protection against Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection via in vivo delivery of an antigonococcal DNA-encoded antibody that has been modified for increased complement activation. Nucleic acid approaches are highly adaptable and could be tremendously beneficial for personalized strategies to combat AMR pathogens.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antimicrobial Stewardship/methods , COVID-19/pathology , Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial/genetics , Coinfection/drug therapy , Coinfection/microbiology , Gonorrhea/drug therapy , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Neisseria gonorrhoeae/drug effects , Neisseria gonorrhoeae/genetics , Precision Medicine , SARS-CoV-2
20.
J Cardiovasc Magn Reson ; 23(1): 86, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1292072

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cardiac evaluations, including cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging and biomarker results, are needed in children during mid-term recovery after infection with SARS-CoV-2. The incidence of CMR abnormalities 1-3 months after recovery is over 50% in older adults and has ranged between 1 and 15% in college athletes. Abnormal cardiac biomarkers are common in adults, even during recovery. METHODS: We performed CMR imaging in a prospectively-recruited pediatric cohort recovered from COVID-19 and multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C). We obtained CMR data and serum biomarkers. We compared these results to age-matched control patients, imaged prior to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. RESULTS: CMR was performed in 17 children (13.9 years, all ≤ 18 years) and 29 age-matched control patients without SARS-CoV-2 infection. Cases were recruited with symptomatic COVID-19 (11/17, 65%) or MIS-C (6/17, 35%) and studied an average of 2 months after diagnosis. All COVID-19 patients had been symptomatic with fever (73%), vomiting/diarrhea (64%), or breathing difficulty (55%) during infection. Left ventricular and right ventricular ejection fractions were indistinguishable between cases and controls (p = 0.66 and 0.70, respectively). Mean native global T1, global T2 values and segmental T2 maximum values were also not statistically different from control patients (p ≥ 0.06 for each). NT-proBNP and troponin levels were normal in all children. CONCLUSIONS: Children prospectively recruited following SARS-CoV-2 infection had normal CMR and cardiac biomarker evaluations during mid-term recovery. Trial Registration Not applicable.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Heart/diagnostic imaging , Heart/physiology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/complications , Adolescent , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/blood
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