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1.
J Nurs Care Qual ; 37(2): 162-167, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1703352

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 negatively impacts many organ systems including the skin. One of the most significant skin-associated adverse events related to hospitalization are pressure injuries. PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to determine 8 risk factors that would place hospitalized patients at a higher risk for hospital-acquired pressure injuries (HAPIs) during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A retrospective, descriptive analysis was conducted in an urban academic health science center located in the southeastern United States. RESULTS: There were 247 of 23 093 patients who had pressure injuries and 1053 patients who had a positive COVID-19 diagnosis. Based on the generalized estimating equation model, diagnosis of COVID-19, age, male gender, risk of mortality, severity of illness, and length of stay are statistically significant factors associated with the development of HAPIs. CONCLUSIONS: Further study should explore pathology of COVID-19 skin changes and what interventions are effective against HAPIs in the COVID-19 population taking into consideration current treatments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pressure Ulcer , COVID-19 Testing , Hospitalization , Hospitals , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pressure Ulcer/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/etiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Am J Nurs ; 121(12): 18-28, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506930

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: For nurses, the challenges posed by demanding work environments and schedules often lead to fatigue, and this can be exacerbated during crises like the COVID-19 pandemic. In this article, the authors discuss causes and challenges of nurse fatigue and consider several evidence-based strategies and solutions for individual nurses and organizations. Barriers to implementation, including a negative workplace culture and inadequate staffing, are also described, and several resources are presented.


Subject(s)
Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/prevention & control , Nurses/psychology , COVID-19/nursing , Humans , Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Workplace/organization & administration , Workplace/psychology
3.
J Nurs Care Qual ; 37(2): 162-167, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455413

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 negatively impacts many organ systems including the skin. One of the most significant skin-associated adverse events related to hospitalization are pressure injuries. PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to determine 8 risk factors that would place hospitalized patients at a higher risk for hospital-acquired pressure injuries (HAPIs) during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A retrospective, descriptive analysis was conducted in an urban academic health science center located in the southeastern United States. RESULTS: There were 247 of 23 093 patients who had pressure injuries and 1053 patients who had a positive COVID-19 diagnosis. Based on the generalized estimating equation model, diagnosis of COVID-19, age, male gender, risk of mortality, severity of illness, and length of stay are statistically significant factors associated with the development of HAPIs. CONCLUSIONS: Further study should explore pathology of COVID-19 skin changes and what interventions are effective against HAPIs in the COVID-19 population taking into consideration current treatments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pressure Ulcer , COVID-19 Testing , Hospitalization , Hospitals , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pressure Ulcer/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/etiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Healthc Qual ; 43(3): 137-144, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217965

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The impact of COVID-19, on the health and safety of patients, staff, and healthcare organizations, has yet to be fully uncovered. Patient adverse events, such as hospital-acquired pressure injuries (HAPIs), have been problematic for decades. The introduction of a pandemic to an environment that is potentially at-risk for adverse events may result in unintended patient safety and quality concerns. We use the learning health system framework to motivate our understanding of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the incidence of HAPIs within our health system. Using a retrospective, observational design, we used descriptive statistics to evaluate trends in HAPI from March to July 2020. Hospital-acquired pressure injury numbers have fluctuated from a steady increase from March-May 2020, hitting a peak high of 90 cases in the month of May. However, the trend in the total all stage HAPIs began to decline in June 2020, with a low of 51 in July, the lowest number since March 2020. Patients evaluated in this study did not have a longitudinal increase in HAPIs from March-July 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic, despite similarities in illness severity between the two time points. Our experience has demonstrated the ability of our organizational leaders to learn quickly during crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Iatrogenic Disease/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/epidemiology , Academic Medical Centers , Adult , Aged , Female , Hospitals, Urban , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Southeastern United States/epidemiology
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