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1.
Pain Physician ; 25(6):427-439, 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2034199

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 quarantine measures have created new challenges in the delivery of medical care, especially in the realm of medical and interventional chronic pain management. This study evaluated the effect of COVID-19 social distancing and quarantine measures on symptoms of pain and anxiety, as well as substance abuse and health care engagement in patients with chronic pain and the role of the clinic's virtual assessment initiatives in managing these patients. METHODS: A 24-question cross-sectional survey was conducted with patients with chronic pain seen at the Montefiore Medical Center Comprehensive Pain Clinic from June 2020 through July 2020. The survey was administered to 552 high-utilizer patients via telephone, evaluating domains such as pain, anxiety, substance use, and health care engagement. The questions were quantitively assessed on a Likert scale or a numerical rating scale. We used descriptive statistics to report our results. RESULTS: Of the 1,023 patients identified as high utilizers of the pain clinic, 552 patients participated in the survey. The median (25th-75th percentile) pain score reported was 7 (5-9) for all responders. Approximately 50% of the patients reported that they were anxious about their pain and somewhat or very concerned that their pain would be uncontrolled during the pandemic. Further, the severity of the pain reported was associated with sleep, appetite, and mood changes. In our cohort, 95% of all patients denied using alcohol, 92% denied using marijuana, and 98% denied using other recreational drugs to manage their pain during the pandemic. In addition, just more than three-fourths (79%) of all patients reported needing to speak with their health care provider during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: The survey conducted among high-utilizers demonstrated that patients who remained engaged with their health care team reported minimal concerns regarding chronic pain and associated symptoms during the COVID-19 quarantine period. In addition, the early implementation of virtual consults in the pain clinic may have contributed to mitigating patient concerns. Finally, the study also identified the importance of outreach and patient education on the availability and utilization of telemedicine services. Consequently, it is reasonable to implement virtual assessments and visits alongside other education outreach methods to engage patients with chronic pain who frequently utilize chronic pain health care resources.

2.
Bangladesh Journal of Veterinary Medicine ; 20(1):17-24, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2026591

ABSTRACT

Background: Poultry and livestock are a leading sub-sector of agriculture, playing an important role to fulfill the protein requirements of the human diet and contributing to the national economy in Bangladesh. This sub-sector is often vulnerable due to frequent outbreaks of diseases in animals and unrest situations worldwide that hamper earning a profit up to the expected mark. Due to pandemic COVID-19, the Bangladesh government was bound to announce a countrywide lockdown and periodical restriction of movement in March 2020 to minimize the spread of the infection. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on poultry and livestock health.

3.
Indian Journal of Ophthalmology ; 70(9):3424-3425, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2024725
4.
Comparative Migration Studies ; 10(1), 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2021350
5.
Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion ; : 1, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2019523

ABSTRACT

The COVID‐19 pandemic provided perhaps the perfect storm to shake up American religion. Congregations closed for a time, the majority offered services online, and people seemed willing to engage with web worship. Moreover, the country was as divided as ever, polarized around the most divisive president in the modern era. In this research note, we focus on data from the middle of the peak of the pandemic (October 2020) to assess the degree to which individuals shopped for new congregations, the degree to which politics and church closures motivated that search, and whether congregational leaving grew during this period. Congregational leaving is perhaps a third greater than normal and shopping appears much higher than normal. Notably, shoppers are not necessarily leavers, and political differences play a role, particularly in the decision to leave among marginal members. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion is the property of Wiley-Blackwell and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

6.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases ; 81:208-209, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2009182

ABSTRACT

Background: Pausing methotrexate (MTX) for two to four weeks, improved immunogenicity of infuenza vaccination in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), albeit a risk of disease fare (1). This guided the framing of guidelines on MTX withdrawal for COVID-19 vaccination (2). However, evidence for MTX withdrawal for COVID-19 vaccination is limited to observational studies only. Objectives: To compare the efficacy and safety of holding MTX after each (MIVAC 1) and only after the second dose (MIVAC II) of the ChAdOx1 vaccine versus continuation of MTX in two randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Methods: Two single centre, investigator-blinded, RCTs were conducted in patients with RA or Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) on stable doses of MTX without prior COVID-19 (CTRI reg. no. MIVAC I: CTRI/2021/07/03463 & MIVAC II: CTRI/2021/07/035307). In MIVAC I, unvaccinated patients were randomised (1:1) to hold or continue MTX for two weeks after each dose of the vaccine. MIVAC II included patients who had continued MTX during the frst dose of ChA-dOx1 and were randomised (1:1) to hold or continue MTX for 2 weeks after the second vaccine dose. The primary outcome for both the trials was the anti-Receptor Binding Domain (RBD) antibody titres measured four weeks after the second vaccine dose (per protocol analysis). Secondary outcome was the fare rate, defned as an increase in disease activity scores (DAS28/cDAPSA) or physician intent to hike DMARDs. Results: 250 patients were randomized for MIVAC 1 and 178 for MIVAC II and after due exclusions, 158 and 157 were eligible for analysis respectively (Figure 1). In MIVAC I, median anti-RBD titres were signifcantly high in the MTX hold group [2484 (1050-4388) versus 1147(433-2360), p=0.001] but the fare rate was higher in the hold group [20 (25%) versus 6(8%) p=0.005] compared to continue group. In MIVAC II median anti-RBD titres were signifcantly high for the MTX hold group [2553 (1792-4823) versus 990 (356-2252), p=0.001] when compared to continue group but there was no difference in the fare rate between the groups [9(11.8%) and 4(7.9%), p=0.15] (Table 1). Since both were parallel studies in similar population, MTX hold arms across both the trials were compared for anti-RBD titres and fare. There was no difference in the anti-RBD titres [p=0.2] between the groups. In MIVAC I, 29(36.25%) patients had reported fare (19 in either frst or second dose, 10 for both doses) when compared to MIVAC II where only 9(11.84%) patients had reported fare after the second dose (P <0.001). Conclusion: Holding MTX after both the doses or only after the second dose of ChAdOx1 yields higher anti-RBD antibody titres as compared to continuing MTX. Comparing across the trials, holding MTX only after the second dose appears to be non-inferior to holding MTX after both doses of the vaccine with a lesser risk of fare.

7.
Transplantation and Cellular Therapy ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2007886

ABSTRACT

Introduction Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) and its management with immunosuppressive therapies increase susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection as well as progression to severe COVID-19. Vaccination against COVID-19 is strongly recommended but efficacy data are limited in this patient population. Methods Responses to COVID-19 vaccination were measured at three timepoints: after the initial vaccine series, before the 3rd dose, and after the 3rd dose, in adults with cGVHD on immunosuppressive therapy (IST). Humoral response was measured by quantitative anti-spike antibody and neutralizing antibody levels. Anti-nucleocapsid antibody levels were measured to detect natural infection. T-cell response was evaluated by a novel immunosequencing technique combined with immune repertoire profiling from cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples (Adaptive Biotechnologies). Present or absent T-cell responses were determined by the relative proportion of unique SARS-CoV-2-associated T-cell receptor sequences (“breadth”) plus clonal expansion of the response (“depth”) compared to a reference population. Based on both neutralizing antibody and T-cell responses, patients were categorized as vaccine responders (both detected), non-responders (neither detected), or mixed (one but not both detected). Results Thirty-two patients enrolled for the initial series;17 (53%) were positive responders, 7 (22%) had a mixed response and 8 (25%) had no response. All but one patient categorized as mixed responders had humoral responses while lacking T-cell responses. No statistical differences were observed in patient characteristics among the 3 groups of patients categorized by immune response, although sample sizes were limited. Significant positive correlations were observed between the robustness of cellular and humoral responses after the initial series. Among the patients (n=20) with paired samples (pre- and post-3rd dose), a third vaccination resulted in increased neutralizing antibody titers. Chronic GVHD (cGVHD) worsened in 10 (26%) patients (6 after the initial series, 4 after the 3rd dose) requiring escalation of immunosuppressive doses in 5 patients, although 4 had been tapering immunosuppression and 5 had already worsening cGVHD at the time of vaccination and a clear association between COVID-19 vaccination and cGVHD could not be drawn. Conclusion Among patients with cGVHD on immunosuppressive therapy, 72% of patients demonstrated a neutralizing antibody response after a two-dose primary COVID-19 vaccination, two thirds of which also developed a T-cell response;25% had neither a humoral nor a T-cell response. A 3rd dose further amplified the antibody response.

9.
Lecture Notes on Data Engineering and Communications Technologies ; 132:831-842, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1990591

ABSTRACT

The advent of COVID-19 has tremendously affected the global economy. More people have suffered, and some of them even lost their lives. As the worst part, many countries are seeing second and third waves of COVID-19 cases despite the vaccination. India is one such country that is worse affected by the COVID-19. Understanding what people of India think and how they express their thoughts through social media platforms like Twitter has a vast significance. Therefore, in this project, we aim to use COVID-19-related tweets during the first COVID-19 lockdown in India and apply the nonnegative tensor factorization (NTF) algorithm to elicit spatio-temporal topic dynamics. While knowing the sentiments of people is important, identifying sentiments for each tweet is time-consuming and hard to interpret. Therefore, in this paper, we propose to apply sentiment analysis on the topics identified using NTF. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.

10.
Pavlović, Tomislav, Azevedo, Flavio, De, Koustav, Riaño-Moreno, Julián C.; Maglić, Marina, Gkinopoulos, Theofilos, Donnelly-Kehoe, Patricio Andreas, Payán-Gómez, César, Huang, Guanxiong, Kantorowicz, Jaroslaw, Birtel, Michèle D.; Schönegger, Philipp, Capraro, Valerio, Santamaría-García, Hernando, Yucel, Meltem, Ibanez, Agustin, Rathje, Steve, Wetter, Erik, Stanojević, Dragan, van Prooijen, Jan-Willem, Hesse, Eugenia, Elbaek, Christian T.; Franc, Renata, Pavlović, Zoran, Mitkidis, Panagiotis, Cichocka, Aleksandra, Gelfand, Michele, Alfano, Mark, Ross, Robert M.; Sjåstad, Hallgeir, Nezlek, John B.; Cislak, Aleksandra, Lockwood, Patricia, Abts, Koen, Agadullina, Elena, Amodio, David M.; Apps, Matthew A. J.; Aruta, John Jamir Benzon, Besharati, Sahba, Bor, Alexander, Choma, Becky, Cunningham, William, Ejaz, Waqas, Farmer, Harry, Findor, Andrej, Gjoneska, Biljana, Gualda, Estrella, Huynh, Toan L. D.; Imran, Mostak Ahamed, Israelashvili, Jacob, Kantorowicz-Reznichenko, Elena, Krouwel, André, Kutiyski, Yordan, Laakasuo, Michael, Lamm, Claus, Levy, Jonathan, Leygue, Caroline, Lin, Ming-Jen, Mansoor, Mohammad Sabbir, Marie, Antoine, Mayiwar, Lewend, Mazepus, Honorata, McHugh, Cillian, Olsson, Andreas, Otterbring, Tobias, Packer, Dominic, Palomäki, Jussi, Perry, Anat, Petersen, Michael Bang, Puthillam, Arathy, Rothmund, Tobias, Schmid, Petra C.; Stadelmann, David, Stoica, Augustin, Stoyanov, Drozdstoy, Stoyanova, Kristina, Tewari, Shruti, Todosijević, Bojan, Torgler, Benno, Tsakiris, Manos, Tung, Hans H.; Umbreș, Radu Gabriel, Vanags, Edmunds, Vlasceanu, Madalina, Vonasch, Andrew J.; Zhang, Yucheng, Abad, Mohcine, Adler, Eli, Mdarhri, Hamza Alaoui, Antazo, Benedict, Ay, F. Ceren, Ba, Mouhamadou El Hady, Barbosa, Sergio, Bastian, Brock, Berg, Anton, Białek, Michał, Bilancini, Ennio, Bogatyreva, Natalia, Boncinelli, Leonardo, Booth, Jonathan E.; Borau, Sylvie, Buchel, Ondrej, de Carvalho, Chrissie Ferreira, Celadin, Tatiana, Cerami, Chiara, Chalise, Hom Nath, Cheng, Xiaojun, Cian, Luca, Cockcroft, Kate, Conway, Jane, Córdoba-Delgado, Mateo A.; Crespi, Chiara, Crouzevialle, Marie, Cutler, Jo, Cypryańska, Marzena, Dabrowska, Justyna, Davis, Victoria H.; Minda, John Paul, Dayley, Pamala N.; Delouvée, Sylvain, Denkovski, Ognjan, Dezecache, Guillaume, Dhaliwal, Nathan A.; Diato, Alelie, Di Paolo, Roberto, Dulleck, Uwe, Ekmanis, Jānis, Etienne, Tom W.; Farhana, Hapsa Hossain, Farkhari, Fahima, Fidanovski, Kristijan, Flew, Terry, Fraser, Shona, Frempong, Raymond Boadi, Fugelsang, Jonathan, Gale, Jessica, García-Navarro, E. Begoña, Garladinne, Prasad, Gray, Kurt, Griffin, Siobhán M.; Gronfeldt, Bjarki, Gruber, June, Halperin, Eran, Herzon, Volo, Hruška, Matej, Hudecek, Matthias F. C.; Isler, Ozan, Jangard, Simon, Jørgensen, Frederik, Keudel, Oleksandra, Koppel, Lina, Koverola, Mika, Kunnari, Anton, Leota, Josh, Lermer, Eva, Li, Chunyun, Longoni, Chiara, McCashin, Darragh, Mikloušić, Igor, Molina-Paredes, Juliana, Monroy-Fonseca, César, Morales-Marente, Elena, Moreau, David, Muda, Rafał, Myer, Annalisa, Nash, Kyle, Nitschke, Jonas P.; Nurse, Matthew S.; de Mello, Victoria Oldemburgo, Palacios-Galvez, Maria Soledad, Pan, Yafeng, Papp, Zsófia, Pärnamets, Philip, Paruzel-Czachura, Mariola, Perander, Silva, Pitman, Michael, Raza, Ali, Rêgo, Gabriel Gaudencio, Robertson, Claire, Rodríguez-Pascual, Iván, Saikkonen, Teemu, Salvador-Ginez, Octavio, Sampaio, Waldir M.; Santi, Gaia Chiara, Schultner, David, Schutte, Enid, Scott, Andy, Skali, Ahmed, Stefaniak, Anna, Sternisko, Anni, Strickland, Brent, Thomas, Jeffrey P.; Tinghög, Gustav, Traast, Iris J.; Tucciarelli, Raffaele, Tyrala, Michael, Ungson, Nick D.; Uysal, Mete Sefa, Van Rooy, Dirk, Västfjäll, Daniel, Vieira, Joana B.; von Sikorski, Christian, Walker, Alexander C.; Watermeyer, Jennifer, Willardt, Robin, Wohl, Michael J. A.; Wójcik, Adrian Dominik, Wu, Kaidi, Yamada, Yuki, Yilmaz, Onurcan, Yogeeswaran, Kumar, Ziemer, Carolin-Theresa, Zwaan, Rolf A.; Boggio, Paulo Sergio, Whillans, Ashley, Van Lange, Paul A. M.; Prasad, Rajib, Onderco, Michal, O'Madagain, Cathal, Nesh-Nash, Tarik, Laguna, Oscar Moreda, Kubin, Emily, Gümren, Mert, Fenwick, Ali, Ertan, Arhan S.; Bernstein, Michael J.; Amara, Hanane, Van Bavel, Jay Joseph.
PNAS nexus ; 1(3), 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1989908

ABSTRACT

At the beginning of 2020, COVID-19 became a global problem. Despite all the efforts to emphasize the relevance of preventive measures, not everyone adhered to them. Thus, learning more about the characteristics determining attitudinal and behavioral responses to the pandemic is crucial to improving future interventions. In this study, we applied machine learning on the multinational data collected by the International Collaboration on the Social and Moral Psychology of COVID-19 (N = 51,404) to test the predictive efficacy of constructs from social, moral, cognitive, and personality psychology, as well as socio-demographic factors, in the attitudinal and behavioral responses to the pandemic. The results point to several valuable insights. Internalized moral identity provided the most consistent predictive contribution—individuals perceiving moral traits as central to their self-concept reported higher adherence to preventive measures. Similar results were found for morality as cooperation, symbolized moral identity, self-control, open-mindedness, and collective narcissism, while the inverse relationship was evident for the endorsement of conspiracy theories. However, we also found a non-neglible variability in the explained variance and predictive contributions with respect to macro-level factors such as the pandemic stage or cultural region. Overall, the results underscore the importance of morality-related and contextual factors in understanding adherence to public health recommendations during the pandemic.

11.
N Engl J Med ; 386(26): 2482-2494, 2022 06 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1984509

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Ibrutinib, a Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor, may have clinical benefit when administered in combination with bendamustine and rituximab and followed by rituximab maintenance therapy in older patients with untreated mantle-cell lymphoma. METHODS: We randomly assigned patients 65 years of age or older to receive ibrutinib (560 mg, administered orally once daily until disease progression or unacceptable toxic effects) or placebo, plus six cycles of bendamustine (90 mg per square meter of body-surface area) and rituximab (375 mg per square meter). Patients with an objective response (complete or partial response) received rituximab maintenance therapy, administered every 8 weeks for up to 12 additional doses. The primary end point was progression-free survival as assessed by the investigators. Overall survival and safety were also assessed. RESULTS: Among 523 patients, 261 were randomly assigned to receive ibrutinib and 262 to receive placebo. At a median follow-up of 84.7 months, the median progression-free survival was 80.6 months in the ibrutinib group and 52.9 months in the placebo group (hazard ratio for disease progression or death, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.59 to 0.96; P = 0.01). The percentage of patients with a complete response was 65.5% in the ibrutinib group and 57.6% in the placebo group (P = 0.06). Overall survival was similar in the two groups. The incidence of grade 3 or 4 adverse events during treatment was 81.5% in the ibrutinib group and 77.3% in the placebo group. CONCLUSIONS: Ibrutinib treatment in combination with standard chemoimmunotherapy significantly prolonged progression-free survival. The safety profile of the combined therapy was consistent with the known profiles of the individual drugs. (Funded by Janssen Research and Development and Pharmacyclics; SHINE ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01776840.).


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols , Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell , Adenine/administration & dosage , Adenine/analogs & derivatives , Aged , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Bendamustine Hydrochloride/administration & dosage , Bendamustine Hydrochloride/adverse effects , Disease Progression , Humans , Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell/drug therapy , Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell/mortality , Maintenance Chemotherapy , Piperidines/administration & dosage , Piperidines/adverse effects , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Pyrazoles/administration & dosage , Pyrazoles/adverse effects , Pyrimidines/administration & dosage , Pyrimidines/adverse effects , Remission Induction , Rituximab/administration & dosage , Rituximab/adverse effects , Survival Analysis
12.
13.
Australas Psychiatry ; : 10398562221117060, 2022 Aug 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1978699

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To provide a commentary on evidence-based recommendations for COVID-19 pandemic risk communication for more effective public health measures. METHOD: We apply the principles of risk communication to address key issues in the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: Risk perception and communication research usefully informs preventative health education and public messaging during disease outbreaks such as the current COVID-19 pandemic, especially for those with severe mental illness. CONCLUSIONS: Key recommendations for pandemic public health risk communication are: clear, timely and balanced information from a reputable source; accurate and non-sensationalised depiction of infection, morbidity and mortality rates; awareness of fear as a powerful motivator for adoption of protective measures against the causative virus; promotion of self-efficacy and sense of control in terms of mitigating the health threats associated with a pandemic; correction of mis- and disinformation regarding the pandemic and associated protective measures; and messaging may need to be modified for people with a mental illness to avoid exacerbations of depressive and anxiety symptoms.

14.
Nat Commun ; 13(1): 4615, 2022 Aug 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1977997

ABSTRACT

Understanding the impact of age on vaccinations is essential for the design and delivery of vaccines against SARS-CoV-2. Here, we present findings from a comprehensive analysis of multiple compartments of the memory immune response in 312 individuals vaccinated with the BNT162b2 SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine. Two vaccine doses induce high antibody and T cell responses in most individuals. However, antibody recognition of the Spike protein of the Delta and Omicron variants is less efficient than that of the ancestral Wuhan strain. Age-stratified analyses identify a group of low antibody responders where individuals ≥60 years are overrepresented. Waning of the antibody and cellular responses is observed in 30% of the vaccinees after 6 months. However, age does not influence the waning of these responses. Taken together, while individuals ≥60 years old take longer to acquire vaccine-induced immunity, they develop more sustained acquired immunity at 6 months post-vaccination. A third dose strongly boosts the low antibody responses in the older individuals against the ancestral Wuhan strain, Delta and Omicron variants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Viral Vaccines , Aged , Antibodies, Viral , Antibody Formation , BNT162 Vaccine , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination , Vaccines, Synthetic , mRNA Vaccines
15.
Int J Drug Policy ; 109: 103825, 2022 Aug 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1977192

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Syringe services programs (SSPs) provide critical evidence-based public health services that decrease harms from drug use for people who use drugs (PWUD). Many SSPs have experienced significant and evolving COVID-19-related disruptions. We aimed to characterize the impacts of COVID-19 on SSP operations in the United States approximately one year into the pandemic. METHODS: Participating sites, selected from a national sample of SSPs, completed a semi-structured interview via teleconference and brief survey evaluating the impacts of COVID-19 on program operations. Data collection explored aspects of program financing, service delivery approaches, linkages to care, and perspectives on engaging PWUD in services one year into the pandemic. Interview data were analyzed qualitatively using Rapid Assessment Process. Survey data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and triangulated with qualitative findings. RESULTS: 27 SSPs completed study-related interviews and surveys between February 2021 - April 2021. One year into the pandemic, SSPs reported continuing to adapt approaches to syringe distribution in response to COVID-19, and identified multiple barriers that hindered their ability to engage program participants in services, including 1) isolation and decreased connectivity with participants, 2) resource restrictions that limit responsiveness to participant needs, 3) reduced capacity to provide on-site HIV/HCV testing and treatment linkages, and 4) changing OUD treatment modalities that were a "double-edged sword" for PWUD. Quantitative survey responses aligned with qualitative findings, highlighting increases in the number of syringes distributed, increases in mobile and home delivery services, and reductions in on-site HIV and HCV testing. CONCLUSION: These data illuminate persistent and cascading risks of isolation, reduced access to services, and limited engagement with program participants that resulted from COVID-19 and continue to create barriers to the delivery of critical harm reduction services. Findings emphasize the need to ensure SSPs have the resources and capacity to adapt to changing public health needs, particularly as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to evolve.

16.
Transpl Int ; 35: 10626, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1974701

ABSTRACT

Alloimmune responses in kidney transplant (KT) patients previously hospitalized with COVID-19 are understudied. We analyzed a cohort of 112 kidney transplant recipients who were hospitalized following a positive SARS-CoV-2 test result during the first 20 months of the COVID-19 pandemic. We found a cumulative incidence of 17% for the development of new donor-specific antibodies (DSA) or increased levels of pre-existing DSA in hospitalized SARS-CoV-2-infected KT patients. This risk extended 8 months post-infection. These changes in DSA status were associated with late allograft dysfunction. Risk factors for new or increased DSA responses in this KT patient cohort included the presence of circulating DSA pre-COVID-19 diagnosis and time post-transplantation. COVID-19 vaccination prior to infection and remdesivir administration during infection were each associated with decreased likelihood of developing a new or increased DSA response. These data show that new or enhanced DSA responses frequently occur among KT patients requiring admission with COVID-19 and suggest that surveillance, vaccination, and antiviral therapies may be important tools to prevent alloimmunity in these individuals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Kidney Transplantation , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antibodies , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Graft Rejection , HLA Antigens , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Transplant Recipients , Vaccination
17.
J Addict Med ; 2022 Aug 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1973276

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We explored syringe service program (SSP) perspectives on barriers, readiness, and programmatic needs to support coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine uptake among people who use drugs. METHODS: We conducted an exploratory qualitative study, leveraging an existing sample of SSPs in the United States. Semistructured, in-depth interviews were conducted with SSP staff between February and April 2021. Interviews were analyzed using a Rapid Assessment Process, an intensive, iterative process that allows for rapid analysis of time-sensitive qualitative data. RESULTS: Twenty-seven SSPs completed a qualitative interview. Many SSP respondents discussed that COVID-19 vaccination was not a priority for their participants because of competing survival priorities, and respondents shared concerns that COVID-19 had deepened participant mistrust of health care. Most SSPs wanted to participate in COVID-19 vaccination efforts; however, they identified needed resources, including adequate space, personnel, and training, to implement successful vaccine programs. CONCLUSIONS: Although SSPs are trusted resources for people who use drugs, many require additional structural and personnel support to address barriers to COVID-19 vaccination among their participants. Funding and supporting SSPs in the provision of COVID-19 prevention education and direct vaccine services should be a top public health priority.

18.
J Perinatol ; 2022 Aug 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1972567

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We examined the relationship between trimester of SARS-CoV-2 infection, illness severity, and risk for preterm birth. STUDY DESIGN: We analyzed data for 6336 pregnant persons with SARS-CoV-2 infection in 2020 in the United States. Risk ratios for preterm birth were calculated for illness severity, trimester of infection, and illness severity stratified by trimester of infection adjusted for age, selected underlying medical conditions, and pregnancy complications. RESULT: Pregnant persons with critical COVID-19 or asymptomatic infection, compared to mild COVID-19, in the second or third trimester were at increased risk of preterm birth. Pregnant persons with moderate-to-severe COVID-19 did not show increased risk of preterm birth in any trimester. CONCLUSION: Critical COVID-19 in the second or third trimester was associated with increased risk of preterm birth. This finding can be used to guide prevention strategies, including vaccination, and inform clinical practices for pregnant persons.

19.
Transplant international : official journal of the European Society for Organ Transplantation ; 35, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1970584

ABSTRACT

Alloimmune responses in kidney transplant (KT) patients previously hospitalized with COVID-19 are understudied. We analyzed a cohort of 112 kidney transplant recipients who were hospitalized following a positive SARS-CoV-2 test result during the first 20 months of the COVID-19 pandemic. We found a cumulative incidence of 17% for the development of new donor-specific antibodies (DSA) or increased levels of pre-existing DSA in hospitalized SARS-CoV-2-infected KT patients. This risk extended 8 months post-infection. These changes in DSA status were associated with late allograft dysfunction. Risk factors for new or increased DSA responses in this KT patient cohort included the presence of circulating DSA pre-COVID-19 diagnosis and time post-transplantation. COVID-19 vaccination prior to infection and remdesivir administration during infection were each associated with decreased likelihood of developing a new or increased DSA response. These data show that new or enhanced DSA responses frequently occur among KT patients requiring admission with COVID-19 and suggest that surveillance, vaccination, and antiviral therapies may be important tools to prevent alloimmunity in these individuals. GRAPHICAL

20.
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION ; 14(4):498-503, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1969767

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought significant changes over social economical and psychological dimensions of human life. After having dealt with the physical health, the post pandemic world will have to deal with its mental health. Fear and anxiety of the virus, physical distancing and safety had its impact on the world population. In Kerala 173 children committed suicide during the lockdown period (till October 30,2020) of which majority are girls. The study was conducted in the Kondazhy Panchayath in the Thrissur district of Kerala. The study was based on primary and secondary data. Primary data was collected using questionnaire and personal interview method of data collection while secondary collected from government officials. The paper highlights the need of emotional regulation, interaction with peers and proper guidance for children. It also studied about how peer interaction and involvement of experts influence lives of children. The study finds that quality of life of girls in institution is better than that of homes due to safer feeling and expert's services in agency. Study suggested that in order to accomplish the new circumstances, an understanding of impact of the pandemic on not just girl children, but the whole human race and the trends should be investigated thoroughly. Appropriate and effective measures are to be taken to reduce the socio-environmental impact of the pandemic on children.

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