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1.
Journal of Knowledge Management ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print):29, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1583850

ABSTRACT

Purpose This study aims to identify context-specific antecedents to schools' absorptive capacity (AC) and to show how those can enact "a virtuous learning circle." Design/methodology/approach The study uses a mixed method: an exploration based on semi-structured interviews with educational experts;the development of a measurement scale and a partial least squares structural equation modelling to test the impact of the antecedents. Findings The results yielded four empirically-grounded antecedents and their measurement scales, namely, prior knowledge, employees' skills, educational projects and interactions with the environment (Studies one and two). All antecedents are significantly and positively related to AC processes (study three). Using the organizational learning theory perspective, the results have been interpreted as an AC "virtuous learning circle." Practical implications With increasing pressures to adapt, a case of which was the COVID-19 pandemic, schools can greatly benefit from absorbing knowledge flows. This suggests the construction a favourable environment for AC. To this end, the individual (employees' prior knowledge and skills), organizational (educational projects) and institutional level of managerial action (interactions with the environment) can be effective when create a recursive organizational learning circle. In addition, this study offers an expert-validated measurement scale for self-assessment of a school's specific contingencies, and thus, for planning of punctual interventions to develop AC. Originality/value This study advances the existing body of knowledge management in the educational context by rigorously identifying and validating a scale for measuring the antecedents of AC and developing an interpretive approach to the AC "virtuous circle."

2.
International Journal of Organizational Analysis ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print):22, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1354374

ABSTRACT

Purpose This study aims to shed light on the ambiguous effects of smart working (SW) on work meaningfulness. On the one hand, SW enables people to benefit from greater work flexibility, advancing individual control over organizational activities. On the other hand, it may impair interpersonal exchanges at work, disrupting job meaningfulness. Hence, the implications of SW on work meaningfulness are investigated through the mediating role of interpersonal exchanges at work. Design/methodology/approach The authors investigate both the direct and indirect effects of SW on employees' perceived meaningfulness at work. Secondary data come from the sixth European Working Conditions Survey. The study encompasses a sample of 30,932 employees. A mediation model based on ordinary least square regressions and bootstrap sampling is designed to obtain evidence of SW's implications on meaningfulness at work through the mediating role of interpersonal relationships (IR). Findings The research findings suggest that SW triggers a positive sense of the significance of work. However, it negatively affects IR with peers and supervisors, entailing professional and spatial isolation. Impaired IR twists the positive implications of SW on organizational meaningfulness (OM), curtailing the employees' sense of significance at work. Practical implications SW is a double-edged sword. It contributes to the enrichment of OM, enhancing the individual self-determination to shape the spatial context of work. However, its side effects on interpersonal exchanges generate a drift toward organizational meaninglessness. Tailored management interventions intended to sustain IR at work are needed to fit the design of SW arrangements to the employees' evolving social needs. Originality/value The paper pushes forward what is currently known about the implications of SW on OM, examining them through the mediating role of IR at work.

3.
Law and Economics Yearly Review ; 9:219-248, 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-941990

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 emergency has created several issues for professors and students, forcing them to quickly learn the various methods for carrying out distance learning, a skill that is not obvious especially for professors with difficulties in using new multimedia technologies. Considering the current global health situation, it is needed for European and USA Universities to discuss, learn and exchange experiences on adapting teaching activities to new learning situations in order to recover and thrive in a post COVID-19 educational world. To tackle these challenges, only a few meetings between expert groups on virtual and student mobilities was held to explore the opportunities of blended learning for the coming academic year. As continuously required in the last months several people in the academic environment are asking a support to manage and reduce the adverse effects of COVID-19 on the University lessons, exams, thesis dissertations, live laboratories, etc. We would like to focus on some opportunities that this global shock is leaving us trying to find a light at the end of the tunnel, but also to the fact that there is already a wide debate going on precisely the lack of adequate perception of the risks determined by COVID-19 in terms of teaching and digital innovation. © 2020 Fondazione Gerardo Capriglione Onlus. All rights reserved.

4.
Database (Oxford) ; 20202020 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-933843

ABSTRACT

The current coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-2, has spurred a wave of research of nearly unprecedented scale. Among the different strategies that are being used to understand the disease and develop effective treatments, the study of physical molecular interactions can provide fine-grained resolution of the mechanisms behind the virus biology and the human organism response. We present a curated dataset of physical molecular interactions focused on proteins from SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-1 and other members of the Coronaviridae family that has been manually extracted by International Molecular Exchange (IMEx) Consortium curators. Currently, the dataset comprises over 4400 binarized interactions extracted from 151 publications. The dataset can be accessed in the standard formats recommended by the Proteomics Standards Initiative (HUPO-PSI) at the IntAct database website (https://www.ebi.ac.uk/intact) and will be continuously updated as research on COVID-19 progresses.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronaviridae , Coronavirus Infections , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Protein Interaction Maps , COVID-19 , Humans , Organ Specificity , Proteomics , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Proteins
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