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1.
J Virol ; 96(9): e0040022, 2022 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1807320

ABSTRACT

Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is a highly pathogenic enteric coronavirus that causes high mortality in piglets. Interferon (IFN) responses are the primary defense mechanism against viral infection; however, viruses always evolve elaborate strategies to antagonize the antiviral action of IFN. Previous study showed that PEDV nonstructural protein 7 (nsp7), a component of the viral replicase polyprotein, can antagonize ploy(I:C)-induced type I IFN production. Here, we found that PEDV nsp7 also antagonized IFN-α-induced JAK-STAT signaling and the production of IFN-stimulated genes. PEDV nsp7 did not affect the protein and phosphorylation levels of JAK1, Tyk2, STAT1, and STAT2 or the formation of the interferon-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3) complex. However, PEDV nsp7 prevented the nuclear translocation of STAT1 and STAT2. Mechanistically, PEDV nsp7 interacted with the DNA binding domain of STAT1/STAT2, which sequestered the interaction between karyopherin α1 (KPNA1) and STAT1, thereby blocking the nuclear transport of ISGF3. Collectively, these data reveal a new mechanism developed by PEDV to inhibit type I IFN signaling pathway. IMPORTANCE In recent years, an emerging porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) variant has gained attention because of serious outbreaks of piglet diarrhea in China and the United States. Coronavirus nonstructural protein 7 (nsp7) has been proposed to act with nsp8 as part of an RNA primase to generate RNA primers for viral RNA synthesis. However, accumulating evidence indicates that coronavirus nsp7 can also antagonize type I IFN production. Our present study extends previous findings and demonstrates that PEDV nsp7 also antagonizes IFN-α-induced IFN signaling by competing with KPNA1 for binding to STAT1, thereby enriching the immune regulation function of coronavirus nsp7.


Subject(s)
Janus Kinase 1 , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus , STAT1 Transcription Factor , Signal Transduction , Viral Nonstructural Proteins , alpha Karyopherins , Animals , Cell Line , Interferons/metabolism , Janus Kinase 1/metabolism , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/genetics , STAT1 Transcription Factor/metabolism , Swine , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , alpha Karyopherins/metabolism
2.
J Virol ; 96(8): e0003722, 2022 04 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779311

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) continues to pose an enormous threat to economic activity and public health worldwide. Previous studies have shown that the nonstructural protein 5 (nsp5, also called 3C-like protease) of alpha- and deltacoronaviruses cleaves Q231 of the NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO), a key kinase in the RIG-I-like receptor pathway, to inhibit type I interferon (IFN) production. In this study, we found that both SARS-CoV-2 nsp5 and SARS-CoV nsp5 cleaved NEMO at multiple sites (E152, Q205, and Q231). Notably, SARS-CoV-2 nsp5 exhibited a stronger ability to cleave NEMO than SARS-CoV nsp5. Sequence and structural alignments suggested that an S/A polymorphism at position 46 of nsp5 in SARS-CoV versus SARS-CoV-2 may be responsible for this difference. Mutagenesis experiments showed that SARS-CoV-2 nsp5 (S46A) exhibited poorer cleavage of NEMO than SARS-CoV-2 nsp5 wild type (WT), while SARS-CoV nsp5 (A46S) showed enhanced NEMO cleavage compared with the WT protein. Purified recombinant SARS-CoV-2 nsp5 WT and SARS-CoV nsp5 (A46S) proteins exhibited higher hydrolysis efficiencies than SARS-CoV-2 nsp5 (S46A) and SARS-CoV nsp5 WT proteins in vitro. Furthermore, SARS-CoV-2 nsp5 exhibited stronger inhibition of Sendai virus (SEV)-induced interferon beta (IFN-ß) production than SARS-CoV-2 nsp5 (S46A), while introduction of the A46S substitution in SARS-CoV nsp5 enhanced suppression of SEV-induced IFN-ß production. Taken together, these data show that S46 is associated with the catalytic activity and IFN antagonism by SARS-CoV-2 nsp5. IMPORTANCE The nsp5-encoded 3C-like protease is the main coronavirus protease, playing a vital role in viral replication and immune evasion by cleaving viral polyproteins and host immune-related molecules. We showed that both SARS-CoV-2 nsp5 and SARS-CoV nsp5 cleave the NEMO at multiple sites (E152, Q205, and Q231). This specificity differs from NEMO cleavage by alpha- and deltacoronaviruses, demonstrating the distinct substrate recognition of SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV nsp5. Compared with SARS-CoV nsp5, SARS-CoV-2 nsp5 encodes S instead of A at position 46. This substitution is associated with stronger catalytic activity, enhanced cleavage of NEMO, and increased interferon antagonism of SARS-CoV-2 nsp5. These data provide new insights into the pathogenesis and transmission of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus 3C Proteases , Interferon Type I , SARS Virus , SARS-CoV-2 , Antiviral Agents , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Humans , Immune Evasion/genetics , Interferon Type I/antagonists & inhibitors , Interferon Type I/metabolism , SARS Virus/enzymology , SARS Virus/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Virus Replication/genetics
3.
J Virol ; 96(4): e0195521, 2022 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1701123

ABSTRACT

The receptor binding domain (RBD) of the coronavirus spike protein (S) has been verified to be the main target for potent neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in most coronaviruses, and the N-terminal domain (NTD) of some betacoronaviruses has also been indicated to induce nAbs. For alphacoronavirus HCoV-229E, its RBD has been shown to have neutralizing epitopes, and these epitopes could change over time. However, whether neutralizing epitopes exist on the NTD and whether these epitopes change like those of the RBD are still unknown. Here, we verified that neutralizing epitopes exist on the NTD of HCoV-229E. Furthermore, we characterized an NTD targeting nAb 5H10, which could neutralize both pseudotyped and authentic HCoV-229E VR740 in vitro. Epitope mapping indicated that 5H10 targeted motif E1 (147-167 aa) and identified F159 as critical for 5H10 binding. More importantly, our results revealed that motif E1 was highly conserved among clinical isolates except for F159. Further data proved that mutations at position 159 gradually appeared over time and could completely abolish the neutralizing ability of 5H10, supporting the notion that position 159 may be under selective pressure during the human epidemic. In addition, we also found that contemporary clinical serum has a stronger binding capacity for the NTD of contemporary strains than historic strains, proving that the epitope on the NTD could change over time. In summary, these findings define a novel neutralizing epitope on the NTD of HCoV-229E S and provide a theoretical basis for the design of vaccines against HCoV-229E or related coronaviruses. IMPORTANCE Characterization of the neutralizing epitope of the spike (S) protein, the major invasion protein of coronaviruses, can help us better understand the evolutionary characteristics of these viruses and promote vaccine development. To date, the neutralizing epitope distribution of alphacoronaviruses is not well known. Here, we identified a neutralizing antibody that targeted the N-terminal domain (NTD) of the alphacoronavirus HCoV-229E S protein. Epitope mapping revealed a novel epitope that was not previously discovered in HCoV-229E. Further studies identified an important residue, F159. Mutations that gradually appeared over time at this site abolished the neutralizing ability of 5H10, indicating that selective pressure occurred at this position in the spread of HCoV-229E. Furthermore, we found that the epitopes within the NTD also changed over time. Taken together, our findings defined a novel neutralizing epitope and highlighted the role of the NTD in the future prevention and control of HCoV-229E or related coronaviruses.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Coronavirus 229E, Human , Coronavirus Infections , Epitopes , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Amino Acid Motifs , Animals , Coronavirus 229E, Human/genetics , Coronavirus 229E, Human/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Epitopes/genetics , Epitopes/immunology , Female , Humans , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
4.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(12): e1010113, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1553552

ABSTRACT

Emerging coronaviruses (CoVs) pose a severe threat to human and animal health worldwide. To identify host factors required for CoV infection, we used α-CoV transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) as a model for genome-scale CRISPR knockout (KO) screening. Transmembrane protein 41B (TMEM41B) was found to be a bona fide host factor involved in infection by CoV and three additional virus families. We found that TMEM41B is critical for the internalization and early-stage replication of TGEV. Notably, our results also showed that cells lacking TMEM41B are unable to form the double-membrane vesicles necessary for TGEV replication, indicating that TMEM41B contributes to the formation of CoV replication organelles. Lastly, our data from a mouse infection model showed that the KO of this factor can strongly inhibit viral infection and delay the progression of a CoV disease. Our study revealed that targeting TMEM41B is a highly promising approach for the development of broad-spectrum anti-viral therapeutics.


Subject(s)
CRISPR-Cas Systems , Gastroenteritis, Transmissible, of Swine/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Membrane Proteins/physiology , Organelles/virology , Transmissible gastroenteritis virus/physiology , Virus Replication , Animals , Gastroenteritis, Transmissible, of Swine/genetics , Gastroenteritis, Transmissible, of Swine/transmission , Membrane Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Swine
5.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 141, 2021 01 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387322

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses spike (S) glycoproteins mediate viral entry into host cells by binding to host receptors. However, how the S1 subunit undergoes conformational changes for receptor recognition has not been elucidated in Alphacoronavirus. Here, we report the cryo-EM structures of the HCoV-229E S trimer in prefusion state with two conformations. The activated conformation may pose the potential exposure of the S1-RBDs by decreasing of the interaction area between the S1-RBDs and the surrounding S1-NTDs and S1-RBDs compared to the closed conformation. Furthermore, structural comparison of our structures with the previously reported HCoV-229E S structure showed that the S trimers trended to open the S2 subunit from the closed conformation to open conformation, which could promote the transition from pre- to postfusion. Our results provide insights into the mechanisms involved in S glycoprotein-mediated Alphacoronavirus entry and have implications for vaccine and therapeutic antibody design.


Subject(s)
CD13 Antigens/metabolism , Coronavirus 229E, Human/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Internalization , Cell Line, Tumor , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Humans , Models, Molecular , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Multimerization , Protein Structure, Quaternary , Protein Subunits/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/ultrastructure
6.
J Virol ; 2021 Jan 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376458

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses that infect humans belong to the Alpha-coronavirus (including HCoV-229E) and Beta-coronavirus (including SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2) genera. In particular, SARS-CoV-2 is currently a major threat to public health worldwide. The spike (S) homotrimers bind to their receptors via the receptor-binding domain (RBD), which is a major target to block viral entry. In this study, we selected Alpha-coronavirus (HCoV-229E) and Beta-coronavirus (SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2) as models. Their RBDs exist two different conformational states (lying or standing) in the prefusion S-trimer structure. Then, the differences in the immune responses to RBDs from these coronaviruses were analyzed structurally and immunologically. Our results showed that more RBD-specific antibodies (antibody titers: 1.28×105; 2.75×105) were induced by the S-trimer with the RBD in the "standing" state (SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2) than the S-trimer with the RBD in the "lying" state (HCoV-229E, antibody titers: <500), and more S-trimer-specific antibodies were induced by the RBD in the SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 (antibody titers: 6.72×105; 5×105) than HCoV-229E (antibody titers:1.125×103). Besides, we found that the ability of the HCoV-229E RBD to induce neutralizing antibodies was lower than S-trimer, and the intact and stable S1 subunit was essential for producing efficient neutralizing antibodies against HCoV-229E. Importantly, our results reveal different vaccine strategies for coronaviruses, and S-trimer is better than RBD as a target for vaccine development in Alpha-coronavirus Our findings will provide important implications for future development of coronavirus vaccines.Importance Outbreak of coronaviruses, especially SARS-CoV-2, poses a serious threat to global public health. Development of vaccines to prevent the coronaviruses that can infect humans has always been a top priority. Coronavirus spike (S) protein is considered as a major target for vaccine development. Currently, structural studies have shown that Alpha-coronavirus (HCoV-229E) and Beta-coronavirus (SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2) RBDs are in "lying" and "standing" states in the prefusion S-trimer structure. Here, we evaluated the ability of S-trimer and RBD to induce neutralizing antibodies among these coronaviruses. Our results showed that the S-trimer and RBD are both candidates for subunit vaccines in Beta-coronavirus (SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2) with a RBD "standing" state. However, for Alpha-coronavirus (HCoV-229E) with a RBD "lying" state, the S-trimer may be more suitable for subunit vaccines than the RBD. Our results will provide novel ideas for the development of vaccines targeting S protein in the future.

7.
Virol Sin ; 36(6): 1421-1430, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1296519

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses (CoVs) are important human and animal pathogens that cause respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases. Porcine epidemic diarrhoea (PED), characterized by severe diarrhoea and vomiting in pigs, is a highly lethal disease caused by porcine epidemic diarrhoea virus (PEDV) and causes substantial losses in the swine industry worldwide. However, currently available commercial drugs have not shown great therapeutic effects. In this study, a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based assay was applied to screen a library containing 1,590 compounds and identified two compounds, 3-(aminocarbonyl)-1-phenylpyridinium and 2,3-dichloronaphthoquinone, that target the 3C-like protease (3CLpro) of PEDV. These compounds are of low molecular weight (MW) and greatly inhibited the activity of this enzyme (IC50 values were obtained in this study). Furthermore, these compounds exhibited antiviral capacity against another member of the CoV family, feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV). Here, the inhibitory effects of these compounds against CoVs on Vero cells and feline kidney cells were identified (with EC50 values) and cell viability assays were performed. The results of putative molecular docking models indicate that these compounds, labeled compound 1 and compound 2, contact the conserved active sites (Cys144, Glu165, Gln191) of 3CLpro via hydrogen bonds. These findings provide insight into the antiviral activities of compounds 1 and 2 that may facilitate future research on anti-CoV drugs.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus, Feline , Swine Diseases , Animals , Cats , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Coronavirus, Feline/drug effects , Molecular Docking Simulation , Swine , Swine Diseases/virology , Vero Cells
8.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 10(1): 481-492, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1124537

ABSTRACT

The unprecedented coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is a serious threat to global public health. Development of effective therapies against SARS-CoV-2 is urgently needed. Here, we evaluated the antiviral activity of a remdesivir parent nucleotide analog, GS441524, which targets the coronavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase enzyme, and a feline coronavirus prodrug, GC376, which targets its main protease, using a mouse-adapted SARS-CoV-2 infected mouse model. Our results showed that GS441524 effectively blocked the proliferation of SARS-CoV-2 in the mouse upper and lower respiratory tracts via combined intranasal (i.n.) and intramuscular (i.m.) treatment. However, the ability of high-dose GC376 (i.m. or i.n. and i.m.) was weaker than GS441524. Notably, low-dose combined application of GS441524 with GC376 could effectively protect mice against SARS-CoV-2 infection via i.n. or i.n. and i.m. treatment. Moreover, we found that the pharmacokinetic properties of GS441524 is better than GC376, and combined application of GC376 and GS441524 had a synergistic effect. Our findings support the further evaluation of the combined application of GC376 and GS441524 in future clinical studies.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Respiratory System/virology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Chlorocebus aethiops , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Prodrugs/pharmacology , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Vero Cells
9.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 10(1): 66-80, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-979439

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses (CoVs) are potential pandemic pathogens that can infect a variety of hosts and cause respiratory, enteric, hepatic and neurological diseases. Nonstructural protein 3 (nsp3), an essential component of the replication/transcription complex, is one of the most important antiviral targets. Here, we report the first crystal structure of multiple functional domains from porcine delta-coronavirus (PDCoV) nsp3, including the macro domain (Macro), ubiquitin-like domain 2 (Ubl2) and papain-like protease (PLpro) catalytic domain. In the asymmetric unit, two of the subunits form the head-to-tail homodimer with an interaction interface between Macro and PLpro. However, PDCoV Macro-Ubl2-PLpro mainly exists as a monomer in solution. Then, we conducted fluorescent resonance energy transfer-based protease assays and found that PDCoV PLpro can cleave a peptide by mimicking the cognate nsp2/nsp3 cleavage site in peptide substrates and exhibits deubiquitinating and de-interferon stimulated gene(deISGylating) activities by hydrolysing ubiquitin-7-amino-4-methylcoumarin (Ub-AMC) and ISG15-AMC substrates. Moreover, the deletion of Macro or Macro-Ubl2 decreased the enzyme activity of PLpro, indicating that Macro and Ubl2 play important roles in maintaining the stability of the PLpro domain. Two active sites of PLpro, Cys260 and His398, were determined; unexpectedly, the conserved site Asp412 was not the third active site. Furthermore, the motif "NGYDT" (amino acids 409-413) was important for stabilizing the enzyme activity of PLpro, and the N409A mutant significantly decreased the enzyme activity of PLpro. These results provide novel insights into the replication mechanism of CoV and new clues for future drug design.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/chemistry , Catalytic Domain , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/physiology , Crystallization , HeLa Cells , Humans , Protein Domains , Protein Multimerization , Ubiquitination
10.
J Gen Virol ; 102(1)2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-910383

ABSTRACT

The emerging pathogen severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused social and economic disruption worldwide, infecting over 9.0 million people and killing over 469 000 by 24 June 2020. Unfortunately, no vaccine or antiviral drug that completely eliminates the transmissible disease coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been developed to date. Given that coronavirus nonstructural protein 1 (nsp1) is a good target for attenuated vaccines, it is of great significance to explore the detailed characteristics of SARS-CoV-2 nsp1. Here, we first confirmed that SARS-CoV-2 nsp1 had a conserved function similar to that of SARS-CoV nsp1 in inhibiting host-protein synthesis and showed greater inhibition efficiency, as revealed by ribopuromycylation and Renilla luciferase (Rluc) reporter assays. Specifically, bioinformatics and biochemical experiments showed that by interacting with 40S ribosomal subunit, the lysine located at amino acid 164 (K164) was the key residue that enabled SARS-CoV-2 nsp1 to suppress host gene expression. Furthermore, as an inhibitor of host-protein expression, SARS-CoV-2 nsp1 contributed to cell-cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase, which might provide a favourable environment for virus production. Taken together, this research uncovered the detailed mechanism by which SARS-CoV-2 nsp1 K164 inhibited host gene expression, laying the foundation for the development of attenuated vaccines based on nsp1 modification.


Subject(s)
Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Lysine/genetics , Ribosomal Proteins/genetics , Ribosome Subunits, Small, Eukaryotic/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Amino Acid Sequence , Amino Acid Substitution , Computational Biology/methods , G1 Phase Cell Cycle Checkpoints/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation , Genes, Reporter , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Luciferases/genetics , Luciferases/metabolism , Lysine/metabolism , Mutation , Ribosomal Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Ribosomal Proteins/metabolism , Ribosome Subunits, Small, Eukaryotic/metabolism , Ribosome Subunits, Small, Eukaryotic/virology , SARS Virus/genetics , SARS Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Sequence Alignment , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Signal Transduction , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism
11.
Viruses ; 12(2)2020 02 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-833229

ABSTRACT

Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), being highly virulent and contagious in piglets, has caused significant damage to the pork industries of many countries worldwide. There are no commercial drugs targeting coronaviruses (CoVs), and few studies on anti-PEDV inhibitors. The coronavirus 3C-like protease (3CLpro) has a conserved structure and catalytic mechanism and plays a key role during viral polyprotein processing, thus serving as an appealing antiviral drug target. Here, we report the anti-PEDV effect of the broad-spectrum inhibitor GC376 (targeting 3Cpro or 3CLpro of viruses in the picornavirus-like supercluster). GC376 was highly effective against the PEDV 3CLpro and exerted similar inhibitory effects on two PEDV strains. Furthermore, the structure of the PEDV 3CLpro in complex with GC376 was determined at 1.65 Å. We elucidated structural details and analyzed the differences between GC376 binding with the PEDV 3CLpro and GC376 binding with the transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) 3CLpro. Finally, we explored the substrate specificity of PEDV 3CLpro at the P2 site and analyzed the effects of Leu group modification in GC376 on inhibiting PEDV infection. This study helps us to understand better the PEDV 3CLpro substrate specificity, providing information on the optimization of GC376 for development as an antiviral therapeutic against coronaviruses.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Peptide Hydrolases/chemistry , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/drug effects , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , Pyrrolidines/pharmacology , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Catalytic Domain , Chlorocebus aethiops , Crystallography, X-Ray , Models, Molecular , Peptide Hydrolases/metabolism , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/enzymology , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/physiology , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , Protease Inhibitors/metabolism , Pyrrolidines/chemistry , Pyrrolidines/metabolism , Substrate Specificity , Sulfonic Acids , Transmissible gastroenteritis virus/enzymology , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/drug effects
12.
J Virol ; 94(15)2020 07 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-831394

ABSTRACT

Currently, an effective therapeutic treatment for porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) remains elusive. PRRSV helicase nsp10 is an important component of the replication transcription complex that plays a crucial role in viral replication, making nsp10 an important target for drug development. Here, we report the first crystal structure of full-length nsp10 from the arterivirus PRRSV, which has multiple domains: an N-terminal zinc-binding domain (ZBD), a 1B domain, and helicase core domains 1A and 2A. Importantly, our structural analyses indicate that the conformation of the 1B domain from arterivirus nsp10 undergoes a dynamic transition. The polynucleotide substrate channel formed by domains 1A and 1B adopts an open state, which may create enough space to accommodate and bind double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) during unwinding. Moreover, we report a unique C-terminal domain structure that participates in stabilizing the overall helicase structure. Our biochemical experiments also showed that deletion of the 1B domain and C-terminal domain significantly reduced the helicase activity of nsp10, indicating that the four domains must cooperate to contribute to helicase function. In addition, our results indicate that nidoviruses contain a conserved helicase core domain and key amino acid sites affecting helicase function, which share a common mechanism of helicase translocation and unwinding activity. These findings will help to further our understanding of the mechanism of helicase function and provide new targets for the development of antiviral drugs.IMPORTANCE Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major respiratory disease agent in pigs that causes enormous economic losses to the global swine industry. PRRSV helicase nsp10 is a multifunctional protein with translocation and unwinding activities and plays a vital role in viral RNA synthesis. Here, we report the first structure of full-length nsp10 from the arterivirus PRRSV at 3.0-Å resolution. Our results show that the 1B domain of PRRSV nsp10 adopts a novel open state and has a unique C-terminal domain structure, which plays a crucial role in nsp10 helicase activity. Furthermore, mutagenesis and structural analysis revealed conservation of the helicase catalytic domain across the order Nidovirales (families Arteriviridae and Coronaviridae). Importantly, our results will provide a structural basis for further understanding the function of helicases in the order Nidovirales.


Subject(s)
Porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus/enzymology , RNA Helicases/chemistry , RNA, Double-Stranded/chemistry , RNA, Viral/chemistry , Viral Proteins/chemistry , Porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus/genetics , Protein Domains , RNA Helicases/genetics , RNA, Double-Stranded/genetics , RNA, Viral/genetics , Viral Proteins/genetics
13.
J Virol Methods ; 276: 113772, 2020 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-829838

ABSTRACT

Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is a highly pathogenic enteric coronavirus causing lethal watery diarrhea in suckling piglets. Reverse genetics is a valuable tool to study the functions of viral genes and to generate vaccine candidates. In this study, a full-length infectious cDNA clone of the highly virulent PEDV strain AJ1102 was assembled in a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC). The rescued virus (rAJ1102) exhibited similar proliferation characteristics in vitro to the wildtype AJ1102. Using CRISPR/Cas9 technology, a recombinant virus rAJ1102-ΔORF3-EGFP in which the ORF3 gene was replaced with an EGFP gene, was successfully generated, and its proliferation characteristics were compared with the parental rAJ1102. Importantly, it just took one week to construct the recombinant PEDV rAJ1102-ΔORF3-EGFP using this method, providing a more efficient platform for PEDV genome manipulation, which could also be applied to other RNA viruses.


Subject(s)
CRISPR-Cas Systems , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/genetics , Swine Diseases/virology , Animals , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Genome, Viral , Recombination, Genetic , Swine , Viral Vaccines/genetics
14.
Antiviral Res ; 173: 104651, 2020 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-824493

ABSTRACT

Emerging coronaviruses (CoVs) primarily cause severe gastroenteric or respiratory diseases in humans and animals, and no approved therapeutics are currently available. Here, A9, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (RTKI) of the tyrphostin class, is identified as a robust inhibitor of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) infection in cell-based assays. Moreover, A9 exhibited potent antiviral activity against the replication of various CoVs, including murine hepatitis virus (MHV), porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) and feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV). We further performed a comparative phosphoproteomic analysis to investigate the mechanism of action of A9 against TGEV infection in vitro. We specifically identified p38 and JNK1, which are the downstream molecules of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) required for efficient TGEV replication, as A9 targets through plaque assays, qRT-PCR and Western blotting assays. p38 and JNK1 inhibitors and RNA interference further showed that the inhibitory activity of A9 against TGEV infection was mainly mediated by the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. All these findings indicated that the RTKI A9 directly inhibits TGEV replication and that its inhibitory activity against TGEV replication mainly occurs by targeting p38, which provides vital clues to the design of novel drugs against CoVs.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , MAP Kinase Signaling System/drug effects , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Transmissible gastroenteritis virus/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Cats , Cell Line , Cells, Cultured , Chlorocebus aethiops , Chromatography, Liquid , Gastroenteritis, Transmissible, of Swine/drug therapy , Gastroenteritis, Transmissible, of Swine/metabolism , Gastroenteritis, Transmissible, of Swine/virology , High-Throughput Screening Assays , Life Cycle Stages , Phosphoproteins/metabolism , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/chemistry , Proteomics/methods , Small Molecule Libraries , Swine , Tandem Mass Spectrometry , Vero Cells
15.
PLoS Pathog ; 16(3): e1008392, 2020 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-5756

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses recognize a variety of receptors using different domains of their envelope-anchored spike protein. How these diverse receptor recognition patterns affect viral entry is unknown. Mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV) is the only known coronavirus that uses the N-terminal domain (NTD) of its spike to recognize a protein receptor, CEACAM1a. Here we determined the cryo-EM structure of MHV spike complexed with mouse CEACAM1a. The trimeric spike contains three receptor-binding S1 heads sitting on top of a trimeric membrane-fusion S2 stalk. Three receptor molecules bind to the sides of the spike trimer, where three NTDs are located. Receptor binding induces structural changes in the spike, weakening the interactions between S1 and S2. Using protease sensitivity and negative-stain EM analyses, we further showed that after protease treatment of the spike, receptor binding facilitated the dissociation of S1 from S2, allowing S2 to transition from pre-fusion to post-fusion conformation. Together these results reveal a new role of receptor binding in MHV entry: in addition to its well-characterized role in viral attachment to host cells, receptor binding also induces the conformational change of the spike and hence the fusion of viral and host membranes. Our study provides new mechanistic insight into coronavirus entry and highlights the diverse entry mechanisms used by different viruses.


Subject(s)
Carcinoembryonic Antigen/chemistry , Murine hepatitis virus/chemistry , Murine hepatitis virus/physiology , Receptors, Virus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Virus Internalization , Animals , Carcinoembryonic Antigen/metabolism , Carcinoembryonic Antigen/ultrastructure , Cell Line, Tumor , Cryoelectron Microscopy , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Membrane Fusion , Mice , Models, Molecular , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Domains , Protein Multimerization , Proteolysis , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/ultrastructure , Recombinant Proteins/chemistry , Recombinant Proteins/metabolism , SARS Virus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/ultrastructure , Virus Attachment
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