Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 2 de 2
Filter
1.
Cardiovasc Res ; 118(10): 2253-2266, 2022 Jul 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2032022

ABSTRACT

Cardiovascular (CV) disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of major morbidity and CVD- and all-cause mortality in most of the world. It is now clear that regular physical activity (PA) and exercise training (ET) induces a wide range of direct and indirect physiologic adaptations and pleiotropic benefits for human general and CV health. Generally, higher levels of PA, ET, and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) are correlated with reduced risk of CVD, including myocardial infarction, CVD-related death, and all-cause mortality. Although exact details regarding the ideal doses of ET, including resistance and, especially, aerobic ET, as well as the potential adverse effects of extreme levels of ET, continue to be investigated, there is no question that most of the world's population have insufficient levels of PA/ET, and many also have lower than ideal levels of CRF. Therefore, assessment and promotion of PA, ET, and efforts to improve levels of CRF should be integrated into all health professionals' practices worldwide. In this state-of-the-art review, we discuss the exercise effects on many areas related to CVD, from basic aspects to clinical practice.


Subject(s)
Cardiorespiratory Fitness , Cardiovascular Diseases , Cardiorespiratory Fitness/physiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control , Exercise/physiology , Humans , Risk Factors
2.
Am J Cardiovasc Drugs ; 20(5): 413-418, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-691058

ABSTRACT

Amiodarone, one of the most widely prescribed antiarrhythmic drugs to treat both ventricular and supraventricular arrhythmias, has been identified as a candidate drug for use against the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). We present the rationale of using amiodarone in the COVID-19 scenario, as well as whether or not amiodarone administration represents a potential strategy to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection, rather than simply used to treat patients already symptomatic and/or with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), based on current evidence.


Subject(s)
Amiodarone/pharmacology , Arrhythmias, Cardiac , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Anti-Arrhythmia Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/drug therapy , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/virology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/physiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome , Virus Internalization/drug effects
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL