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1.
Acta Biomed ; 93(5): e2022313, 2022 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2091393

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: The pandemic caused by SARS-COV-2 has increased Semi-Intensive Care Unit (SICU) admission, causing an increase in healthcare-associated infection (HAI). Mostly HAI reveals the same risk factors, but fewer studies have analyzed the possibility of multiple coinfections in these patients. The study aimed was to identify patterns of co-presence of different species describing at the same time the association between such patterns and patient demographics and, finally, comparing the patterns between the two cohorts of COVID-19 patients admitted at Policlinico during the first wave and the second one). METHODS: All the patients admitted to SICUs during two COVID-19 waves, from March to June 2020 months and from October to December 2020, were screened following the local infection control surveillance program; whoever manifested fever has undergone on microbiological culture to detect bacterial species. Statistical analysis was performed to observe the existence of microbiological patterns through DBSCAN method. RESULTS: 246 patients were investigated and 83 patients were considered in our study because they presented infection symptoms with a mean age of 67 years and 33.7% of female patients. During the first and second waves were found respectively 10 and 8 bacterial clusters with no difference regarding the most frequent species. CONCLUSIONS: The results show the importance of an analysis which considers the risk factors for the possibility of co- and superinfection (such as age and gender) to structure a good prognostic tool to predict which patients will encounter severe coinfections during hospitalization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coinfection , Cross Infection , Humans , Female , Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Coinfection/epidemiology , Intensive Care Units , Hospitalization , Hospitals , Retrospective Studies
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 03 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785635

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: While the effectiveness of tetanus-diphtheria-pertussis childhood immunization programs is unquestionable, the actual need for a periodic boosting vaccination in adults is controversial. In Italy, the Ministry of Health recommends a Tdap booster vaccination every 10 years. The aim of this study is to assess the real-world adherence of Italian regional healthcare services to national recommendations and to evaluate two alternative strategies. METHODS: Annual Tdap vaccine requirements by the 21 Italian regions were retrieved from related tender announcements, and regional and national vaccination coverage rates (VCRs) were estimated for three scenarios, namely the currently recommended 10-year booster vaccination, a single booster shot at age 50 and at age 65. RESULTS: In Scenario 1, no region reached a VCR > 30%, and the national VCR was 10.6%; in Scenario 2, five regions achieved the optimal vaccination coverage of ≥95%, but the vast majority continued to have inadequate VCRs, with a national VCR of 54.4%; in Scenario 3, five regions reached VCRs exceeding 100%, with VCRs from other regions significantly improving and a national VCR of 74.8%. CONCLUSIONS: A substantial lack of adherence by Italian regional healthcare services to current national recommendations on tetanus-diphtheria-pertussis adult vaccination was shown. Scenario 3 is the most feasible, i.e., a single booster shot at age 65, possibly administrable along with other already-recommended, age-specific vaccines.


Subject(s)
Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular Pertussis Vaccines , Diphtheria , Tetanus , Whooping Cough , Aged , Child , Diphtheria/prevention & control , Diphtheria-Tetanus Vaccine , Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular Pertussis Vaccines/therapeutic use , Humans , Immunization, Secondary , Italy , Middle Aged , Tetanus/prevention & control , Vaccination , Whooping Cough/prevention & control
3.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-317311

ABSTRACT

Background: Health care workers (HCW) are at high risk of get infected by SARS CoV-2 and thus they are a priority for vaccination. We hereby aim to investigate whether the risk of severe and moderate systemic symptoms (MSS) after vaccination is higher in HCWs with a history of previous COVID-19. Methods: An online questionnaire was offered to all HCW undergoing anti-SARS CoV-2 mRNA BNT162b2 vaccine. Previous SARS-CoV-2 infection/COVID-19 was recorded. Local and systemic symptoms after each of the two doses were reported. MSS were those either interfering with daily activities or resulting in time off-work. Factors associated to MSS were identified by logistic regression.Findings: 3,078 HCW were included. Previous SARS-CoV-2 infection/COVID-19 occurred in 396 subjects (12·9%). 59·6% suffered from >=1 local or systemic symptom after the first and 73·4% after the second dose. MSS occurred in 6·3% of cases (14·4% with previous vs 5·1% with no COVID-19 p<.001) and in 28·3% (24·5% in COVID-19 vs 28·3% no COVID, p=0·074) after the first and second dose. Subjects already experiencing COVID-19 had an independent 3-fold higher risk of MSS after the first and a 30% lower risk after the second dose. Females and younger subjects were at higher risk. No serious adverse events were reported. Interpretation: Possible differences in immune reactivity are drivers of MSS among females, younger and previously infected HCWs. Vaccination strategies according to previous COVID-19 along with data on the longevity of immune response need to be further investigated. Funding: NoneDeclaration of Interests: None of the authors have any conflicts of interest to disclose.Ethics Approval Statement: The protocol was approved by the Ethic Committee Area 1, Milan.

4.
Acta Biomed ; 92(S6): e2021447, 2021 10 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504263

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Seasonal influenza exerts a deep and multi-level impact on population and public health systems. Among at risk groups, healthcare workers (HCWs) represent a crucial one due to the threat of absenteeism and consequent disruption of healthcare services (and economic losses). Also in this group vaccine hesitancy is a well known issue, therefore innovative and 360-degree strategies are urgently needed to overcome the problem. METHODS: in the 2020-21 influenza vaccination campaign in a research and teaching hospital in Milan, Italy, the working group implemented three different strategies: the offer of vaccination through both an ad hoc ambulatory and several itinerant (on site) vaccinating teams, a promotional and educational communication campaign, a gaming strategy Results: vaccinated employees nearly doubled (2103 vs 1153 in 2019-20 flu vaccination campaign), reaching a comprehensive vaccination coverage rate (VCR) of 43,1%. A highly significant increase in the 40-59 age group was registered. While physicians and nursing staff confirmed to be the most represented categories among vaccinated subjects, administrative and auxiliary staffs performed the greatest increase compared to the previous campaign. The on site vaccination was clearly preferred than the ad hoc one (1693 HCWs, 80,5% vs 410, 19,5%). Vaccinated for the first time registered a significant increase (40,2% vs 36,2% in 2019-20 campaign). CONCLUSIONS: such meaningful results confirm the effectiveness of the strategies implemented in the present campaign, suggesting their possible application in the debated COVID19-third-dose vaccination campaign.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza, Human , COVID-19 Vaccines , Health Personnel , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Immunization Programs , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(11)2021 May 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256528

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, more than ever, optimal influenza vaccination coverage among healthcare workers (HCWs) is crucial to avoid absenteeism and disruption of health services, as well as in-hospital influenza outbreaks. The aim of this study is to analyze the 2020 influenza vaccination campaign, comparing it with the previous year's in a research and teaching hospital in Northern Italy. METHODS: adopting an approach based on combined strategies, three interventions were deployed: a promotional and educational campaign, vaccination delivery through both ad hoc and on-site ambulatories, and a gaming strategy. Personal data and professional categories were collected and analyzed using univariate logistic regression. Vaccinated HCWs were asked to fill in a questionnaire to describe their reasons for vaccination adherence. RESULTS: the vaccination coverage rate (VCR) was 43.1%, compared to 21.5% in 2019. The highest increase was registered among administrative staff (308.3%), while physicians represent the most vaccinated category (n = 600). Moreover, residents (prevalence ratio (PR): 1.12; 95% CI 1.04-1.20), as well as intensive care (PR: 1.44; 95% CI: 1.24-1.69) and newborn workers (PR: 1.41; 95% CI: 1.20-1.65) were, respectively, the categories most frequently vaccinated for the first time. CONCLUSION: the significant increase in vaccination coverage rate confirms the suitability of the combined strategy of delivering the flu vaccination campaign and represents a first step towards reaching WHO recommended vaccination rates.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , Influenza, Human , Attitude of Health Personnel , Health Personnel , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Immunization Programs , Infant, Newborn , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Italy/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination
6.
EClinicalMedicine ; 36: 100914, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252783

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health care workers (HCWs) are at high risk of contracting an infection by SARS CoV-2 and thus they are a priority for vaccination. We hereby aim to investigate whether the risk of severe and moderate systemic symptoms (MSS) after vaccination is higher in HCWs with a history of previous COVID-19. METHODS: An online questionnaire was offered to the cohort all HCWs undergoing anti-SARS CoV-2 mRNA BNT162b2 vaccination between January 4th and February 9th 2021 in two large tertiary hospitals (ASST Santi Paolo and Carlo) in Milan, Italy. Previous SARS-CoV-2 infection/COVID-19 was recorded. Local and systemic symptoms after each of the two doses were reported. MSS were those either interfering with daily activities or resulting in time off-work. Factors associated to MSS were identified by logistic regression. FINDINGS: 3,078 HCW were included. Previous SARS-CoV-2 infection/COVID-19 occurred in 396 subjects (12·9%). 59·6% suffered from ≥1 local or systemic symptom after the first and 73·4% after the second dose. MSS occurred in 6·3% of cases (14·4% with previous vs 5·1% with no COVID-19 p<0·001) and in 28·3% (24·5% in COVID-19 vs 28·3% no COVID, p = 0·074) after the first and second dose, respectively. Subjects already experiencing COVID-19 had an independent 3-fold higher risk of MSS after the first and a 30% lower risk after the second dose. No severe adverse events were reported. INTERPRETATION: Our data confirm in a real-world setting, the lack of severe adverse events and the short duration of reactogenicity in already infected HCWs. Possible differences in immune reactivity are drivers of MSS among this group of HCWs, as well as among females and younger individuals. FUNDING: None.

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