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1.
1st International Meeting for Applied Geoscience and Energy ; 2021-September:3081-3085, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1596933

ABSTRACT

Yangon has a population of over seven million and is one of the fastest growing cities in Myanmar. Like many of Myanmar's large cities, it is located in close proximity to the Sagaing fault, a major strike-slip fault in Southeast Asia that has historically produced magnitude >7 earthquakes. In addition, the Indo-Myanmar region hosts complex tectonics related to the subduction of the India plate beneath the Burma microplate and large magnitude earthquakes are expected for the locked part of the subduction system. An improved assessment of the ground motions that may occur during a large earthquake rupture can lead to better city planning and management to help prevent the loss of life and property in Myanmar's expanding population centers. This requires an improved understanding of the subsurface and geologic structures that underlie the major cities. As part of the Myanmar Universities Seismic Experiment (MUSE) project, 11 professors and students in Yangon were remotely trained during the COVID-19 lockdown on the installation of nodal seismic stations. We have recorded data at 110 three-component nodes from the IRIS PASSCAL instrument center. Instruments were deployed along three densely spaced seismic profiles in one of the first US-based international efforts of this kind. Data recording started on 21 March 2020 and continued for ~30 days. Following a similar study in Los Angeles, California, we will use receiver function computed from recordings of eight teleseismic earthquakes to determine the depth to basement beneath Yangon. These results and other seismological analyses will aid in providing better estimates of ground shaking in the event of moderate-large earthquakes. © 2021 Society of Exploration Geophysicists First International Meeting for Applied Geoscience & Energy

2.
Journal of Experimental Biology and Agricultural Sciences ; 8(Suppl. 1):S114-S118, 2020.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1319898

ABSTRACT

Many unanswered questions remain about COVID-19 infection caused by SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. One such looming concern is the possibility of reinfection of recovered cases. We conducted a literature review on various aspects of this possibility, including the case presentations of relapsed/re-infected patients, the immune response of production of neutralizing antibodies, immunity in response to coronavirus during SARS-CoV2 and MERS, possibility of false-positive results of real-time polymerase chain reaction. We concluded that further studies are required to establish whether relapse or reinfection is possible firmly. However, these possibilities point towards the needs of change in the protocol of isolation, quarantine, and discharge. It also undermines the role of the upcoming vaccine in disease prevention and treatment.

3.
Open Forum Infectious Diseases ; 7(SUPPL 1):S165, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1185701

ABSTRACT

Background: During the COVID-19 pandemic, contact tracing program as part of a larger epidemiological case investigation was effectively implemented by the local department of health in Paterson, NJ. The Paterson Communicable Disease Strike Team (PCDST) was established by leveraging skills and using existing public health staff of the health department team which led to a timely and robust public health intervention. Methods: PCDST comprised of 25 communicable disease investigators/contact tracers established in preparation for public health response in the event of large-scale communicable disease outbreaks pre-COVID. In March 2020 with initial COVID-19 cases in Paterson, PCDST was activated utilizing NJ DOH's Communicable Disease Reporting and Surveillance System (CDRSS). Additional staff members were cross-trained to augment team as new cases surged. A triage coordinator would identify and assign new cases to disease investigators at a 24/7 schedule. Disease Investigators would provide test results, perform epidemiological case interviews, elicit close contacts, and provide isolation/quarantine recommendations. Case-contact monitors followed up daily basis until completion of isolation/quarantine period. Results: As of June 15, 2020, 6537 cases tested COVID-19 (+) in Paterson, NJ. 91% of cases and their contacts were interviewed. Peak occurred in mid-April with 263 cases on a single day. By mid-June, daily number of cases declined to 7/day. Reported COVID-19 mortality rate in Paterson (4.65%), compared to surrounding towns in the same county of Passaic (6%), other large cities in New Jersey (Newark 8%, Jersey City 7.4%) and New Jersey state (7.59%). Conclusion: Despite limited resources, we were able to cross train and engage our frontline public health team (PCDST) to investigate and effectively contact trace new COVID-19 cases to help contain spread of infection. Although its unclear if our intervention impacted mortality rates, it is certain that contact tracing using a trained public health workforce is a model that has proven successful in Paterson. A local public health workforce vested in their communities can develop rapport needed to build trust and confidence in an intervention that elicits confidential medical information to limit viral transmission.

4.
Journal of Experimental Biology and Agricultural Sciences ; 8(Special Issue 1):S114-S118, 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-994749

ABSTRACT

Many unanswered questions remain about COVID-19 infection caused by SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. One such looming concern is the possibility of reinfection of recovered cases. We conducted a literature review on various aspects of this possibility, including the case presentations of relapsed/re-infected patients, the immune response of production of neutralizing antibodies, immunity in response to coronavirus during SARS-CoV2 and MERS, possibility of false-positive results of real-time polymerase chain reaction. We concluded that further studies are required to establish whether relapse or reinfection is possible firmly. However, these possibilities point towards the needs of change in the protocol of isolation, quarantine, and discharge. It also undermines the role of the upcoming vaccine in disease prevention and treatment. © 2020, Editorial board of Journal of Experimental Biology and Agricultural Sciences. All rights reserved.

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