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1.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(7)2022 Jun 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1911731

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Blacks are dying from the novel coronavirus of 2019 (COVID-19) at disproportionate rates and tend to have more COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy than Whites. These disparities may be attributable to health knowledge and government/medical mistrust stemming from negative experiences with the medical system historically and presently (e.g., the Tuskegee Experiment, provider maltreatment). METHOD: The present study assessed COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy and the effectiveness of a 1.5 h, dialogue-based, web intervention hosted by an academic-community partnership team. The webinar included approximately 220 male and female, English speaking, Black churchgoers in the western U.S. The webinar focused on the psychology of fear and facts about the vaccine development. RESULTS: The sample was mostly females who had higher vaccine hesitancy than men. A third of participants feared hospitalization if they contracted COVID-19. Many participants reported that learning facts about COVID-19 was most impactful. Statistical analyses indicated an increased willingness to get vaccinated after the webinar in comparison to before (t(25) = -3.08, p = 0.005). CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that virtual webinars may be effective at reducing COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among Black churchgoers and may be applicable in addressing other health behaviors.

2.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(12)2021 Dec 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1614016

ABSTRACT

In this study, we evaluated the status of and attitudes toward COVID-19 vaccination of healthcare workers in two major hospital systems (academic and private) in Southern California. Responses were collected via an anonymous and voluntary survey from a total of 2491 participants, including nurses, physicians, other allied health professionals, and administrators. Among the 2491 participants that had been offered the vaccine at the time of the study, 2103 (84%) were vaccinated. The bulk of the participants were middle-aged college-educated White (73%), non-Hispanic women (77%), and nursing was the most represented medical occupation (35%). Political affiliation, education level, and income were shown to be significant factors associated with vaccination status. Our data suggest that the current allocation of healthcare workers into dichotomous groups such as "anti-vaccine vs. pro-vaccine" may be inadequate in accurately tailoring vaccine uptake interventions. We found that healthcare workers that have yet to receive the COVID-19 vaccine likely belong to one of four categories: the misinformed, the undecided, the uninformed, or the unconcerned. This diversity in vaccine hesitancy among healthcare workers highlights the importance of targeted intervention to increase vaccine confidence. Regardless of governmental vaccine mandates, addressing the root causes contributing to vaccine hesitancy continues to be of utmost importance.

4.
Open forum infectious diseases ; 8(Suppl 1):S339-S339, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1563762

ABSTRACT

Background In the U.S., non-Hispanic Black individuals are disproportionately represented amongst COVID-19 mortalities. The COVID-19 vaccines are poised to change this outcome;however, inequitable access and decades of medical mistreatment have resulted in healthcare mistrust and an associated low uptake within this group. Loma Linda University (LLU) houses the largest mass vaccination site in San Bernardino County (SBC) California;nevertheless, there has been a perpetual low representation of Black vaccinees. To increase the number of Black persons vaccinated, a selected team at LLU leveraged a community-academic partnership model to address vaccine hesitancy and increase access to the COVID-19 vaccines. The objective of this study was to evaluate the number of Black persons vaccinated in community settings compared to the mass clinic. Methods LLU developed a tiered approach to increase COVID-19 vaccinations within Black SBC communities. The first tier engaged faith leaders with the academic community in disseminating COVID-19 health information, the second included culturally representative LLU healthcare professionals in the delivery of COVID-19 educational webinars, and the third was to conduct low barrier, remote-site vaccination clinics, within targeted Black communities. Following these efforts, we compared the number of Black individuals vaccinated in the LLU mass clinic to those vaccinated in the community remote-site clinics. Results The remote-site COVID-19 vaccination clinics commenced in February 2021. From February 1 until April 30, 2021, 24,808 individuals were vaccinated in the LLU mass clinic with a first dose (Pfizer or Moderna) or single dose (Janssen) of a COVID-19 vaccine, however, only 908 (3.7%) were Black vaccinees. Contrastingly, the LLU remote site clinics vaccinated 1,542 individuals with a first or single dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. Of those vaccinees, 675 (44%) were Black. Conclusion The multi-tiered community approach (remote-site vaccination clinics) resulted in a necessary overrepresentation of Black vaccinees, previously underrepresented in the LLU traditional mass vaccination clinic effort (44% vs. 3.7%, respectively). Further research is warranted to examine the key elements to increase vaccinations amongst minoritized groups. COVID-19 Vaccination Comparisons Between Models This table includes data from the Loma Linda University Mass Vaccination Clinic and the Remote-Site Vaccination Efforts compared to the San Bernardino County Demographics Disclosures All Authors: No reported disclosures

5.
Biol Psychiatry Glob Open Sci ; 1(4): 324-335, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439907

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, mental health among youth has been negatively affected. Youth with a history of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), as well as youth from minoritized racial-ethnic backgrounds, may be especially vulnerable to experiencing COVID-19-related distress. The aims of this study are to examine whether exposure to pre-pandemic ACEs predicts mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic in youth and whether racial-ethnic background moderates these effects. METHODS: From May to August 2020, 7983 youths (mean age, 12.5 years; range, 10.6-14.6 years) in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study completed at least one of three online surveys measuring the impact of the pandemic on their mental health. Data were evaluated in relation to youths' pre-pandemic mental health and ACEs. RESULTS: Pre-pandemic ACE history significantly predicted poorer mental health across all outcomes and greater COVID-19-related stress and impact of fears on well-being. Youths reported improved mental health during the pandemic (from May to August 2020). While reporting similar levels of mental health, youths from minoritized racial-ethnic backgrounds had elevated COVID-19-related worry, stress, and impact on well-being. Race and ethnicity generally did not moderate ACE effects. Older youths, girls, and those with greater pre-pandemic internalizing symptoms also reported greater mental health symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Youths who experienced greater childhood adversity reported greater negative affect and COVID-19-related distress during the pandemic. Although they reported generally better mood, Asian American, Black, and multiracial youths reported greater COVID-19-related distress and experienced COVID-19-related discrimination compared with non-Hispanic White youths, highlighting potential health disparities.

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