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2.
Frontiers in medicine ; 8, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1567706

ABSTRACT

Background: The Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic accelerated digitalization in medical education. Continuing medical education (CME) as a substantial component of this system was relevantly affected. Here, we present the results of an online survey highlighting the impact on and the role of online CME. Methods: An online survey of 44 questions was completed by users of a German online CME platform receiving an invitation via newsletter. CME habits, requirements, personal perception, and impact of the pandemic were inquired. Standard statistical methods were applied. Results: A total of 2,961 responders took the survey with 2,949 completed surveys included in the final analysis. Most contributions originated from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Physicians accounted for 78.3% (57.5% hospital doctors) of responses followed by midwives (7.3%) and paramedics (5.7%). Participating physicians were mainly board-certified specialists (69%;55.75% hospital specialists, 13.25% specialists in private practice). Frequent online lectures at regular intervals (77.8%) and combined face-to-face and online CME (55.9%) were favored. A duration of 1–2 h was found ideal (57.5%). Technical issues were less a major concern since the pandemic. Conclusion: A shift from face-to-face toward online CME events was expectedly detected since the outbreak. Online CME was accelerated and promoted by the pandemic. According to the perception of users, the CME system appears to have reacted adequately to meet their demand but does not replace human interaction.

3.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 773806, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1556063

ABSTRACT

Background: The Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic accelerated digitalization in medical education. Continuing medical education (CME) as a substantial component of this system was relevantly affected. Here, we present the results of an online survey highlighting the impact on and the role of online CME. Methods: An online survey of 44 questions was completed by users of a German online CME platform receiving an invitation via newsletter. CME habits, requirements, personal perception, and impact of the pandemic were inquired. Standard statistical methods were applied. Results: A total of 2,961 responders took the survey with 2,949 completed surveys included in the final analysis. Most contributions originated from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Physicians accounted for 78.3% (57.5% hospital doctors) of responses followed by midwives (7.3%) and paramedics (5.7%). Participating physicians were mainly board-certified specialists (69%; 55.75% hospital specialists, 13.25% specialists in private practice). Frequent online lectures at regular intervals (77.8%) and combined face-to-face and online CME (55.9%) were favored. A duration of 1-2 h was found ideal (57.5%). Technical issues were less a major concern since the pandemic. Conclusion: A shift from face-to-face toward online CME events was expectedly detected since the outbreak. Online CME was accelerated and promoted by the pandemic. According to the perception of users, the CME system appears to have reacted adequately to meet their demand but does not replace human interaction.

4.
Med Klin Intensivmed Notfmed ; 115(Suppl 3): 115-122, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1029344

ABSTRACT

In view of the globally evolving coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, German hospitals rapidly expanded their intensive care capacities. However, it is possible that even with an optimal use of the increased resources, these will not suffice for all patients in need. Therefore, recommendations for the allocation of intensive care resources in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic have been developed by a multidisciplinary group of authors with the support of eight scientific medical societies. The recommendations for procedures and criteria for prioritisations in case of resource scarcity are based on scientific evidence, ethicolegal considerations and practical experience. Medical decisions must always be based on the need and the treatment preferences of the individual patient. In addition to this patient-centred approach, prioritisations in case of resource scarcity require a supraindividual perspective. In such situations, prioritisations should be based on the criterion of clinical prospect of success in order to minimize the number of preventable deaths due to resource scarcity and to avoid discrimination based on age, disabilities or social factors. The assessment of the clinical prospect of success should take into account the severity of the current illness, severe comorbidities and the patient's general health status prior to the current illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus , Critical Care , Humans , Methacrylates , Pandemics , Resource Allocation , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Med Klin Intensivmed Notfmed ; 115(8): 654-667, 2020 Nov.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-932492

ABSTRACT

Lung and chest ultrasound are further examination modalities in addition to computed tomography and laboratory diagnostics in patients with COVID-19. It extends the clinical-physical examination because it can examine lung surface sensitively. Lung surface pattern changes have been found in sonograms of patients with COVID-19 pneumonia and during the course of the disease. German specialist societies of clinical acute, emergency and intensive care medicine as well as imaging, which are concerned with the care of patients with SARS-CoV­2 infection and COVID-19, have coordinated recommendations for lung and thorax sonography. This document has been created within a transparent process, led by the German Society of Interdisciplinary Emergency and Acute Medicine e. V. (DGINA), and worked out by an expert panel and delegates from the societies. Sources of the first 200 cases were summarized. Typical thorax sonographic findings are presented. International sources or standards that were available in PubMed until May 24, 2020 were included. Using case studies and multimedia content, the document is intended to not only support users but also demonstrate quality features and the potential of chest and lung sonography. The German Society for Ultrasound in Medicine (DEGUM) is carrying out a multicenter study (study coordination at the TU Munich).


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2 , Ultrasonography
6.
Med Klin Intensivmed Notfmed ; 115(6): 477-485, 2020 Sep.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-700035

ABSTRACT

In view of the globally evolving Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) pandemic, German hospitals rapidly expanded their intensive care capacities. However, it is possible that even with an optimal use of the increased resources, these will not suffice for all patients in need. Therefore, recommendations for the allocation of intensive care resources in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic have been developed by a multidisciplinary authors group with support of eight scientific medical societies. The recommendations for procedures and criteria for prioritisations in case of resource scarcity are based on scientific evidence, ethico-legal considerations and practical experience. Medical decisions must always be based on the need and the treatment preferences of the individual patient. In addition to this patient-centred approach, prioritisations in case of resource scarcity require a supra-individual perspective. In such situations, prioritisations should be based on the criterion of clinical prospect of success in order to minimize the number of preventable deaths due to resource scarcity and to avoid discrimination based on age, disabilities or social factors. Assessment of the clinical prospect of success should take into account the severity of the current illness, severe comorbidities and the patient's general health status prior to the current illness.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Critical Care/ethics , Health Care Rationing/ethics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Clinical Decision-Making , Humans , Pandemics/ethics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical
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