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1.
J Pediatric Infect Dis Soc ; 2022 Feb 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1709612

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has caused an increase in antibiotic use in different settings. We describe the antibiotic prescribing prevalence, associated factors and trends, as well as concomitant bacterial infections in children hospitalized with COVID-19 or multisystemic inflammatory syndrome related to SARS-CoV-2 in Spain.

2.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-322383

ABSTRACT

Background: We aimed to identify the spectrum of disease in children with COVID-19, and the risk factors for admission in paediatric intensive care units (PICUs). Methods: : We conducted a multicentre, prospective study of children with SARS-CoV-2 infection in 76 Spanish hospitals. We included children with COVID-19 or multi-inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C) younger than 18 years old, attended during the first year of the pandemic. Results: We enrolled 1 200 children. A total of 666 (55.5%) were hospitalized, and 123 (18.4%) required admission to PICU. Most frequent major clinical syndromes in the cohort were: mild syndrome (including upper respiratory tract infection and flu-like syndrome, skin or mucosae problems and asymptomatic), 44.8%;bronchopulmonary syndrome (including pneumonia, bronchitis and asthma flare), 18.5%;fever without a source, 16.2%;MIS-C, 10.6%;and gastrointestinal syndrome, 10%. In hospitalized children, the proportions were: 28.5%, 25.7%, 16.5%, 19.1% and 10.2%, respectively. Risk factors associated with PICU admission were MIS-C (odds ratio [OR]: 37.5,95% CI 22.7 to 57.8), moderate or severe liver disease (OR: 9,95% CI 1.6 to 47.6), chronic cardiac disease (OR: 4.8,95% CI 1.8 to 13) and asthma or recurrent wheezing (OR: 2.8,95% CI 1.3 to 5.8). However, asthmatic children were admitted into the PICU due to MIS-C or pneumonia, not due to asthma flare. Conclusion: Hospitalized children with COVID-19 usually present as one of five major clinical phenotypes of decreasing severity. Risk factors for PICU include MIS-C, elevation of inflammation biomarkers, asthma, moderate or severe liver disease and cardiac disease.

3.
Eur J Pediatr ; 181(3): 1105-1115, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504861

ABSTRACT

We aimed to identify the spectrum of disease in children with COVID-19, and the risk factors for admission in paediatric intensive care units (PICUs). We conducted a multicentre, prospective study of children with SARS-CoV-2 infection in 76 Spanish hospitals. We included children with COVID-19 or multi-inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C) younger than 18 years old, attended during the first year of the pandemic. We enrolled 1200 children. A total of 666 (55.5%) were hospitalised, and 123 (18.4%) required admission to PICU. Most frequent major clinical syndromes in the cohort were mild syndrome (including upper respiratory tract infection and flu-like syndrome, skin or mucosae problems and asymptomatic), 44.8%; bronchopulmonary syndrome (including pneumonia, bronchitis and asthma flare), 18.5%; fever without a source, 16.2%; MIS-C, 10.6%; and gastrointestinal syndrome, 10%. In hospitalised children, the proportions were 28.5%, 25.7%, 16.5%, 19.1% and 10.2%, respectively. Risk factors associated with PICU admission were age in months (OR: 1.007; 95% CI 1.004 to 1.01), MIS-C (OR: 14.4, 95% CI 8.9 to 23.8), chronic cardiac disease (OR: 4.8, 95% CI 1.8 to 13), asthma or recurrent wheezing (OR: 2.5, 95% CI 1.2 to 5.2) and after excluding MIS-C patients, moderate/severe liver disease (OR: 8.6, 95% CI 1.6 to 47.6). However, asthmatic children were admitted into the PICU due to MIS-C or pneumonia, not due to asthma flare.Conclusion: Hospitalised children with COVID-19 usually present as one of five major clinical phenotypes of decreasing severity. Risk factors for PICU include MIS-C, elevation of inflammation biomarkers, asthma, moderate or severe liver disease and cardiac disease. What is Known: • All studies suggest that children are less susceptible to serious SARS-CoV-2 infection when compared to adults. Most studies describe symptoms at presentation. However, it remains unclear how these symptoms group together into clinically identifiable syndromes and the severity associated with them. What is New: • We have gathered the primary diagnoses into five major syndromes of decreasing severity: MIS-C, bronchopulmonary syndrome, gastrointestinal syndrome, fever without a source and mild syndrome. Classification of the children in one of the syndromes is unique and helps to assess the risk of critical illness and to define the spectrum of the disease instead of just describing symptoms and signs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome
4.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 40(11): 2295-2303, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1479485

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study is to present the first nationwide microbiological and epidemiological study of invasive group A Streptococcus (iGAS) disease in Spain. One thousand eight hundred ninety-three iGAS isolates were analyzed over 2007-2019. emm typing was performed by sequencing the gene's variable 5' end, exotoxin genes were identified by PCR, and antimicrobial susceptibility explored via the E test and disk diffusion. Five hundred twenty-three isolates were associated with sepsis, 292 with cellulitis, 232 with scarlet fever, 153 with pneumonia, 141 with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, and 94 with necrotizing fasciitis. The most prevalent emm types were emm1 (449/1893 isolates), emm89 (210/1893), emm3 (208/1893), emm4 (150/1893), emm12 (112/1893) emm6 (107/1893), emm87 (89/1893), emm28 (88/1893), emm75 (78/1893), emm77 (78/1893), emm11 (58/1893), and emm22 (35/1893). emm1, emm3, emm4, and emm6 were the predominant types affecting children (mostly respiratory infections), while emm11, emm77, and emm89 prevailed in the elderly (mostly skin infections). Each emm type was associated with one or more exotoxin gene (spe, sme, and ssa) profiles. speA was detected in 660 isolates, speB in 1829, speC in 1014, speF in 1826, speG in 1651, speJ in 716, speH in 331, smeZ in 720, and ssa in 512. Isolates with speA were associated with the most severe infections. Penicillin susceptibility was universal. Two hundred twenty-four isolates were resistant to tetracycline, 169 to erythromycin, and 81 to clindamycin. Tetracycline, erythromycin, and clindamycin resistance rates declined over the study period. The above information could serve as the basis for continued surveillance efforts designed to control disease cause by this bacterium.


Subject(s)
Streptococcal Infections/microbiology , Streptococcus pyogenes/isolation & purification , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Bacterial Proteins/genetics , Bacterial Proteins/metabolism , Carrier Proteins/genetics , Carrier Proteins/metabolism , Child , Child, Preschool , Erythromycin/pharmacology , Exotoxins/genetics , Exotoxins/metabolism , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Middle Aged , Penicillins/pharmacology , Spain/epidemiology , Streptococcal Infections/epidemiology , Streptococcus pyogenes/classification , Streptococcus pyogenes/drug effects , Streptococcus pyogenes/genetics , Young Adult
5.
J Infect ; 82(3): 414-451, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386002

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study describes the characteristics of children requiring admission with an acute lower-respiratory disease (ALRD) during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemics. METHODS: Epidemiological, clinical, and microbiological data from patients with ALRD (pneumonia, bronchiolitis, bronchospasm) admitted to a reference paediatric hospital in Spain during the pandemic peak (week 11-20/2020) were prospectively analysed. RESULTS: 110 patients were included. 7 were SARS-CoV-2(+) and they were older in comparison to SARS-CoV-2(-). Among SARS-CoV-2(+) patients, pneumonia was the main clinical diagnosis (6/7) and bronchospasm was absent. Only 1 of 29 infants diagnosed with bronchiolitis was SARS-CoV-2(+). Lower values of leucocytes, lymphocytes, neutrophils, and platelets and higher values of creatinine were found in SARS-CoV-2(+). Human-rhinovirus/enterovirus was the main detection (11/32). There were not differences in PICU admission rates between SARS-CoV-2(+) and (-). CONCLUSIONS: Most of the ALRD episodes identified during the pandemics were not related to SARS-CoV-2 infection. SARS-CoV-2 was mainly found causing pneumonia in older children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Child , Hospitalization , Humans , Infant , Pandemics , Spain/epidemiology
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