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1.
Journal of Thoracic Oncology ; 16(10):S1068-S1069, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1474825

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Thymic epithelial tumors (TET) are the most common neoplasms of the anterior mediastinum. The incidence of this disease is extremely low, and there is little data on the Brazilian context. This study aims to describe the experience from PUCRS's Sao Lucas Hospital Thoracic Surgery team on mediastinal tumor resections (MTR) during the investigation of TET. Methods: The Thoracic Surgery team from PUCRS's Sao Lucas Hospital maintains a prospective database with the Brazilian Thoracic Surgery Society. Data from patients who underwent investigation for TET within 2016 and 2020 were collected from medical records in March 2021. Descriptive analyses were performed on this data. We used the classification proposed by the World Health Organization (2004) to classify all cases found. Results: There were 90 MTR performed on a total of 87 patients between 2016 and 2020. Of these, 56 (64.36%) were female, and the average age was 54.28. Among performed MTR, 11 (12.22%) were due to TET, being 10 (11.11%) by thymoma and 1 (1.11%) by thymic carcinoma. From the 10 cases of thymoma, 7 (70%) were female, and the only patient diagnosed with thymic carcinoma was male. Of the 11 patients diagnosed with TET, the average age was 56. According to the TET classification used, 1 (9.09%) was type A, 5 (45.45%) was AB, 1 (9.09%) was B2, 1 (9.09%) was B3, 1 (9.09%) was C (thymic carcinoma was classified as type C), 1 (9.09%) classified as types B1 and B2, and another (9.09%) as types AB and B3. Among 10 cases of thymoma, 2 (20%) had myasthenia gravis (MG). Immediate postoperative mortality was zero. During yearly follow-up, only 1 (9.09%) patient had a recurrence of disease, and 1 (9.09%) died. It is important to highlight that from all 90 MTR performed, 80 (88.88%) occurred between 2016 to 2019 (18 in 2016, 16 in 2017, 21 in 2018, 25 in 2019), resulting in an average of 20 RTM per year. However, in 2020, only 10 (11.11%) RTM were performed, showing a significant reduction during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic in Brazil. Conclusion: Our data converge to what is shown in the literature since a small portion of patients who underwent MTR had a thymoma diagnosis and only one had a diagnosis of thymic carcinoma. The most frequent type was AB. Studies demonstrate that 30-65% of patients with thymoma also have MG. On the other hand, our sample shows 20%. It is essential to emphasize the reduction in the number of procedures during the Sars-CoV-2 pandemic in 2020. Keywords: thymic carcinoma, thymoma, thoracic malignancies

2.
Revista Da Associacao Medica Brasileira ; 67(3):355-359, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1381317

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The sudden COVID-19 outbreak has changed our health system. Physicians had to face the challenge of treating a large number of critically ill patients with a new disease and also maintain the essential healthcare services functioning properly. To prevent disease dissemination, authorities instructed people to stay at home and seek medical care only if they experienced respiratory distress. However, there are concerns those patients did not seek necessary health care because of these orientations. This study aims to see how the pandemic has influenced the severity of the disease, complication, and mortality of patients undergoing emergency cholecystectomy and appendectomy. METHODS: Retrospective review of medical records of patients admitted to the emergency department and undergoing to cholecystectomy and appendicectomy in the periods from March to May 2019 and 2020. RESULTS: We observed that COVID-19 did not change the severity of presentation or the outcome of patients with gallbladder disease, but caused a 24.2% increase in the prevalence of complicated appendicitis (p<0.05). However, disagreeing with what was expected, we did not identify a greater number of perioperative complications in patients undergoing an appendectomy. CONCLUSION: Therefore, it seems that in a university tertiary referral center COVID-19 did not influence the management and outcome of inflammatory diseases treated in the surgical emergency department.

4.
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular ; 16(3):124, 2020.
Article in Portuguese | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1192864
5.
Open Forum Infectious Diseases ; 7(SUPPL 1):S303-S304, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1185836

ABSTRACT

Background: The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on people living with HIV (PWH) are unknown. Beyond SARS-CoV-2 co-infection, the pandemic may have devastating consequences for HIV care delivery. Understanding these is crucial as reduced antiretroviral therapy (ART) availability alone could lead to ≥500,000 AIDS-related deaths in 2020-2021. With Latin America now a focal point in the pandemic, we sought to describe the impact of COVID-19 on HIV care at Latin American clinical sites. Methods: Caribbean, Central and South America network for HIV epidemiology (CCASAnet) and additional Brazilian HIV care sites in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, and Peru were included. An electronic survey of COVID-19 effects on HIV clinic operations was administered in Spanish or English via phone and email, April 28-June 2, 2020. We also compared national COVID-19 case, mortality, and policy data from public sources. Results: Brazil's and Mexico's epidemics appear most pronounced, with >10,000 confirmed COVID-19-related deaths (Figure 1);countries implemented “social distancing” policies at different times after initial cases, with Haiti earliest and Mexico latest (Figure 2). Nearly all 13 sites reported decreased hours and providers for HIV care. Twelve of 13 reported increased use of telehealth, suspension/postponements of routine HIV appointments, and/or suspension of HIV research. Eleven of 13 reported initiation of new COVID-19 research but suspension of community HIV testing, and nearly half provided additional ART supplies. Nearly 70% reported impacts on HIV viral load testing and nearly 40% reported personal protective equipment stock-outs (Table). All 13 sites experienced changes in resources/services in tandem with national policies;there was wide variation, however, in the number of economic and health supports implemented thus far (e.g., quarantines, tax deferrals, interest rate reductions, etc.), from 172 COVID-19-related policies in Brazil to only 30 in Mexico Conclusion: The COVID-19 pandemic has already had a substantial effect on daily operations of HIV clinics in Latin America. The downstream effects of these impacts on HIV outcomes in Latin America will need to be further studied. (Table Presented).

7.
Revista Portuguesa de Cirurgia Cardio-toracica e Vascular ; 27(4):295-296, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-995424

ABSTRACT

Introduction Lemierre's syndrome (LS) refers to infectious thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein (IJV) developed as a complication of an oropharyngeal infection. It is a serious condition which may lead to septicemia and septic embolization. LS is most frequently caused by the anaerobic Fusobacterium necrophorum. In the current post-antibiotic era, it is rare (annual incidence of 0.8 cases/million). Many clinicians are unaware of LS, leading it to be termed "the forgotten disease." Signs and symptoms include odynophagia, fever and easy fatigue simulating, among others, infection by COVID-19. Broad spectrum antibiotherapy should be started promptly. If a deep abscess is present, drainage is indicated. In cases of persistent sepsis or embolization, surgical ligation/excision of the IJV may be considered. Currently, the most controversial role in LS management is anticoagulation. Compared with pre-antibiotic era mortality has much improved (0-18%). Since 2004 there are only four cases of LS reported in Portugal (Medline).

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