Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 7 de 7
Filter
1.
J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown) ; 23(4): 264-271, 2022 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1562166

ABSTRACT

AIMS: To estimate if chronic anticoagulant (CAC) treatment is associated with morbidity and mortality outcomes of patients hospitalized for SARS-CoV-2 infection. METHODS: In this European multicentric cohort study, we included 1186 patients of whom 144 were on CAC (12.1%) with positive coronavirus disease 2019 testing between 1 February and 30 July 2020. The average treatment effect (ATE) analysis with a propensity score-matching (PSM) algorithm was used to estimate the impact of CAC on the primary outcomes defined as in-hospital death, major and minor bleeding events, cardiovascular complications (CCI), and acute kidney injury (AKI). We also investigated if different dosages of in-hospital heparin were associated with in-hospital survival. RESULTS: In unadjusted populations, primary outcomes were significantly higher among CAC patients compared with non-CAC patients: all-cause death (35% vs. 18% P < 0.001), major and minor bleeding (14% vs. 8% P = 0.026; 25% vs. 17% P = 0.014), CCI (27% vs. 14% P < 0.001), and AKI (42% vs. 19% P < 0.001). In ATE analysis with PSM, there was no significant association between CAC and primary outcomes except for an increased incidence of AKI (ATE +10.2%, 95% confidence interval 0.3-20.1%, P = 0.044). Conversely, in-hospital heparin, regardless of dose, was associated with a significantly higher survival compared with no anticoagulation. CONCLUSIONS: The use of CAC was not associated with the primary outcomes except for the increase in AKI. However, in the adjusted survival analysis, any dose of in-hospital anticoagulation was associated with significantly higher survival compared with no anticoagulation.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Acute Kidney Injury/chemically induced , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Anticoagulants/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19 Testing , Cohort Studies , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 57(10)2021 Oct 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470926

ABSTRACT

Infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) which was revealed an official pandemic by the World Health Organization on 11 March 2020. The current pandemic, the third of this decade, is the worst in terms of suffering and deaths related. COVID-19 represents an unprecedented challenge for medical communities and patients around the world. High-resolution computed tomography of the chest (HRCT) is a fundamental tool in both management and diagnosis of the disease. Imaging plays an essential role in the diagnosis of all the manifestations of the disease and its complications and the correct use and interpretation of imaging tests are essential. Pneumomediastinum has been reported rarely in COVID-19 patients. We were one of the first groups to share our experiences in uncommon parenchymal complications of COVID-19 with spontaneous pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum, but also with new-onset bronchiectasis and cysts. A finding of pneumopericardium is also unusual. We hereby report a rare case of spontaneous pneumopericardium in a patient with COVID-19 pneumonia treated only with a high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pneumopericardium , Cannula , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumopericardium/diagnostic imaging , Pneumopericardium/etiology , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Respir Med ; 187: 106550, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331211

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In COVID-19 associated hypoxemic acute respiratory failure (ARF) without mandatory indication for urgent endotracheal intubation, a trial of CPAP may be considered. We aimed to evaluate HACOR (heart rate, acidosis, consciousness, oxygenation, respiratory rate) score performance in these patients as predictor of CPAP failure. METHODS: Prospective observational multicentric study (three centers in different countries), including adult patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia admitted to a respiratory intermediate care unit, presenting PaO2/FiO2 < 300 and PaCO2 < 45 mmHg, who received CPAP. One hour after starting CPAP, HACOR was calculated. RESULTS: We enrolled 128 patients, mean age 61,7 years. Mean HACOR at 1 h after starting CPAP was 3,27 ± 3,84 and mean PaO2/FiO2 was 203,30 ± 92,21 mmHg; 35 patients (27,3 %) presented CPAP failure: 29 underwent oro-tracheal intubation and 6 died due to COVID-19 (all having a do-not-intubate order). HACOR accuracy for predicting CPAP failure was 82,03 %, while PaO2/FiO2 accuracy was 81,25 %. CONCLUSION: Although HACOR score had a good diagnostic performance in predicting CPAP failure in COVID-19-related ARF, PaO2/FiO2 has also shown to be a good predictor of failure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Continuous Positive Airway Pressure , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology , Acidosis , Aged , Blood Gas Analysis , COVID-19/physiopathology , Consciousness , Female , Heart Rate , Humans , Intubation, Intratracheal , Male , Middle Aged , Predictive Value of Tests , Prospective Studies , ROC Curve , Respiratory Insufficiency/diagnosis , Respiratory Rate , Treatment Failure
6.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 9(6)2021 May 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243974

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pneumomediastinum, subcutaneous emphysema and pneumothorax are not rarely observed during the COVID-19 pandemic. Such complications can worsen gas exchange and the overall prognosis in critical patients. The aim of this study is to investigate what predisposing factors are related to pneumomediastinum and pneumothorax in SARS-CoV2-Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), what symptoms may predict a severe and potentially fatal complication and what therapeutical approach may provide a better outcome. METHODS: In this single center cohort study, we recorded data from 45 critically ill COVID-19 patients who developed one or more complicating events among pneumomediastinum, subcutaneous emphysema and pneumothorax. All patients showed ARDS and underwent non-invasive ventilation (NIV) at baseline. Patients with mild to moderate ARDS and pneumomediastinum/pneumothorax (n = 25) received High Flow Nasal Cannula (HFNC), while patients with severe ARDS and pneumomediastinum/pneumothorax underwent HFNC (n = 10) or invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) (n = 10). RESULTS: Pneumomediastinum/pneumothorax developed in 10.5% of subjects affected by SARS-coV2-ARDS. Dyspnea affected 40% and cough affected 37% of subjects. High resolution computed tomography of the chest showed bilateral diffuse ground glass opacities (GGO) in 100% of subjects. Traction bronchiolectasis, reticulation, crazy paving and distortion were observed in 64%. Furthermore, 36% showed subcutaneous emphysema. Non-severe ARDS cases received HFNC, and 76% patients recovered from pneumomediastinum/pneumothorax over a median follow up of 5 days. Among severe ARDS cases the recovery rate of pneumomediastinum/pneumothorax was 70% with the HFNC approach, and 10% with IMV. CONCLUSION: HFNC is a safe and effective ventilatory approach for critical COVID-19 and has a positive role in associated complications such as pneumomediastinum and pneumothorax.

7.
IDCases ; 21: e00794, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-276496

ABSTRACT

We describe a 42-year old woman, admitted to our Department after 15 days of persistence of respiratory failure and treated with infusion of intravenous immunoglobulin with a successful outcome.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL