Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 5 de 5
Filter
1.
Pol J Radiol ; 87: e271-e273, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1884600

ABSTRACT

Purpose: There are currently only scarce data available describing imaging manifestations in children with COVID-19. The aim of this study was to analyse pulmonary lesions on chest radiography (CXR) in paediatric patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 and to compare the CXR results with clinical and laboratory data. Material and methods: In this prospective single-centre study we included 118 consecutive paediatric patients with COVID-19. CXR was performed in 107 patients. Clinical and laboratory evaluations were performed on the same day as CXR, immediately (0 to 2 days) after the COVID-19 diagnosis had been established. Results: Pulmonary lesions were found in 24/107 (23%) children, including 14/24 (58%) with bilateral abnormalities. Compared to patients with normal CXR, children presenting with pulmonary lesions were significantly younger (7.0 ± 4.5 vs. 9.5 ± 4.5 years, p = 0.03) and more commonly presented with an elevated D-dimer level (6/24, 25% vs. 5/81, 7%; p = 0.008). Almost half (46%) of the children with pulmonary lesions were asymptomatic, and 11/60 (18%) of all asymptomatic patients presented with abnormal CXR. Conclusions: Pulmonary lesions in the course of COVID-19 are more common in younger children and those presenting with an elevated D-dimer level. A significant proportion of asymptomatic COVID-19 patients develop CXR abnormalities.

2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-319205

ABSTRACT

Data on the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in children are limited, and studies from Europe are scarce. We analyzed the clinical severity and epidemiologic aspects of COVID-19 in consecutive children aged 0 – 18 years, referred with a suspicion of COVID-19 between February 1, and April 15, 2020. RT-PCR on a nasopharyngeal swab was used to confirm COVID-19. 319 children met the criteria of a suspected case. COVID-19 was diagnosed in 15/319 (4.7%) patients (8 male;mean age 10.5 years). All of them had household contact with an infected relative. Five (33.3%) patients were asymptomatic. In 9/15 (60.0%) children, the course of the disease was mild, and in 1/15 (6.7%), it was moderate, with the following symptoms: fever (46.7%), cough (40%), diarrhea (20%), vomiting (13.3%), rhinitis (6.7%), and shortness of breath (6.7%). In the COVID-19-negative patients, other infections were confirmed, including influenza in 32/319 (10%). The clinical course of COVID-19 and influenza differed significantly based on the clinical presentation. In conclusion, the clinical course of COVID-19 in children is usually mild or asymptomatic. In children suspected of having COVID-19, other infections should not be overlooked. The main risk factor for COVID-19 in children is household contact with an infected relative.

3.
J Clin Med ; 10(21)2021 Oct 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488638

ABSTRACT

This prospective multicenter cohort study aimed to analyze the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in children. The study, based on the pediatric part of the Polish SARSTer register, included 1283 children (0 to 18 years) who were diagnosed with COVID-19 between 1 March 2020 and 31 December 2020. Household contact was reported in 56% of cases, more frequently in younger children. Fever was the most common symptom (46%). The youngest children (0-5 years) more frequently presented with fever, rhinitis and diarrhea. Teenagers more often complained of headache, sore throat, anosmia/ageusia and weakness. One fifth of patients were reported to be asymptomatic. Pneumonia was diagnosed in 12% of patients, more frequently in younger children. During the second wave patients were younger than during the first wave (median age 53 vs. 102 months, p < 0.0001) and required longer hospitalization (p < 0.0001). Significantly fewer asymptomatic patients were noted and pneumonia as well as gastrointestinal symptoms were more common. The epidemiological characteristics of pediatric patients and the clinical presentation of COVID-19 are age-related. Younger children were more frequently infected by close relatives, more often suffered from pneumonia and gastrointestinal symptoms and required hospitalization. Clinical courses differed significantly during the first two waves of the pandemic.

4.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 5760, 2021 03 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1132105

ABSTRACT

Data on the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in children are limited, and studies from Europe are scarce. We analyzed the clinical severity and epidemiologic aspects of COVID-19 in consecutive children aged 0-18 years, referred with a suspicion of COVID-19 between February 1, and April 15, 2020. RT-PCR on a nasopharyngeal swab was used to confirm COVID-19. 319 children met the criteria of a suspected case. COVID-19 was diagnosed in 15/319 (4.7%) patients (8 male; mean age 10.5 years). All of them had household contact with an infected relative. Five (33.3%) patients were asymptomatic. In 9/15 (60.0%) children, the course of the disease was mild, and in 1/15 (6.7%), it was moderate, with the following symptoms: fever (46.7%), cough (40%), diarrhea (20%), vomiting (13.3%), rhinitis (6.7%), and shortness of breath (6.7%). In the COVID-19-negative patients, other infections were confirmed, including influenza in 32/319 (10%). The clinical course of COVID-19 and influenza differed significantly based on the clinical presentation. In conclusion, the clinical course of COVID-19 in children is usually mild or asymptomatic. In children suspected of having COVID-19, other infections should not be overlooked. The main risk factor for COVID-19 in children is household contact with an infected relative.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Poland/epidemiology , Prospective Studies
5.
Eur J Pediatr ; 180(4): 1299-1305, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-866209

ABSTRACT

Between February and May 2020, during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, paediatric emergency departments in 12 European countries were prospectively surveyed on their implementation of SARS-CoV-2 disease (COVID-19) testing and infection control strategies. All participating departments (23) implemented standardised case definitions, testing guidelines, early triage and infection control strategies early in the outbreak. Patient testing criteria initially focused on suspect cases and later began to include screening, mainly for hospital admissions. Long turnaround times for test results likely put additional strain on healthcare resources.Conclusion: Shortening turnaround times for SARS-CoV-2 tests should be a priority. Specific paediatric testing criteria are needed. What is Known: • WHO and public health authorities issued case definitions, testing and infection control recommendations for COVID-19 in January. • SARS-CoV-2 testing was made available across Europe in February. What is New: • Paediatric emergency departments implemented COVID-19-specific procedures rapidly, including case definitions, testing guidelines and early triage. • A third of surveyed departments waited more than 24 h for SARS-CoV-2 test to be reported, resulting in additional strain on resources.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , Emergency Service, Hospital , Infection Control/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Adolescent , COVID-19 Testing/standards , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Child , Child, Preschool , Clinical Protocols , Emergency Service, Hospital/standards , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Infection Control/standards , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Male , Pediatrics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Prospective Studies , Triage/methods , Triage/standards , Triage/statistics & numerical data
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL